Course Syllabus

Department Library Tech. Pgm.
Instructor Prof. Colby Glass
Phone 210-561-7905
Email cglass@alamo.edu
Office Location None
Course Title Information Sources and Services
Course # LBRA-1375-001
Call # 11803
Credit Hours 3-3-0


 

Orientation for the Summer 2015 online Introduction to Reference class is on Monday, June 8th, at 6:30 pm in room 139 of the Ozuna (library/LRC) building. Attendance is mandatory. If you are unable to attend, please email Professor Glass at cglass@alamo.edu and explain.

Student Responsibilities | Student Communication Grades | Subject Matter of Each Week | Course Requirements | Your Grades

COURSE DESCRIPTION (e-catalog)

Covers reference philosophy, criteria to evaluate an information source, information sources available in all formats, the reference interview, search strategies, Boolean searching, and digital resources.

This course was developed by Judy Gallien, but is usually taught by Professor Glass.

 

PREREQUISITES, CO-REQUISITES and OTHER REQUIREMENTS:

None.

 

TEXTBOOKS (including ISBN#) and REQUIRED MATERIALS/RECOMMENDED READINGS:

There is no textbook required for this course. Textbooks have become far too expensive and are an exorbitant burden on students. All readings are on the Internet or in ACES Canvas.

(From the Administration: A student of this institution is not under any obligation to purchase a textbook from a college-affiliated bookstore. The same textbook may also be available from an independent retailer, including an online retailer.)

 

COURSE CONTENT:

Covers reference philosophy, criteria to evaluate an information source, information sources available in all formats, the reference interview, search strategies, Boolean searching, and digital resources.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

By the end of this course, you will be familiar with reference philosophy, criteria to evaluate an information source, information sources available in all formats, the reference interview, search strategies, Boolean searching, and digital resources.

 

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:

Performance objectives are that students will be at least 80% proficient in all course content and practices.

 

METHODS OF MEASUREMENT (grade requirements):

Quizzes, reference observation, and discussions.

 

COLLEGE and/or DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS: (added by each college to template)

The LTA Department requires that the student earn at least a grade of C to earn credit towards the LTA completion certificate.

 

ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTOR REQUIREMENTS: (added by individual instructor)

None.

 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES:

A. Attendance

Effective Spring Term 2010, student absences will be recorded from the first day the class meets. Regular and punctual attendance in all classes and laboratories, day and evening, is required. Students who are absent for any reason should always consult with their instructors.

Course syllabi must provide specific information regarding attendance, including, for courses involving the internet, online activity that constitutes "attendance." Also, both tardiness and early departure from class may be considered forms of absenteeism. In all cases, students will be held responsible for completion of course requirements covered in their absence.

Note from Instructor: Weekly discussions and quizzes will constitute attendance.

Additionally, it is the student's responsibility to drop a course for nonattendance. Note: if you are having technical difficulties, don't give up. Call the PAC helpdesk at 210-486-3777, or call me at 210-561-7905.

Course instructors establish policy with regard to attendance in their respective syllabi and may drop a student for excessive absences. Absences are considered excessive when more than 12.5 percent of the total contact hours of instruction in a semester, including lecture and lab, are missed. For example, in a three-credit-hour lecture class, students may be dropped after more than six contact hours of absences. In a four-credit-hour lecture/lab class, students may be dropped after more than eight contact hours of absences. Absences are counted regardless of whether they occur consecutively.

In special programs with additional accreditation or certification standards, additional attendance requirements may be enforced but faculty must clearly explain these policies in their syllabi.

Note from Instructor: Any grade less than C is not applicable toward the LTA completion certificate.

Students who stop attending class for any reason should contact the instructor and the college registrar to officially withdraw from the class. Students may be required to consult with an advisor or designee before dropping. Failure to officially withdraw may result in a failing grade for the course. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw officially from a class by submitting a completed Withdrawal Form to the Admissions and Records Office.

B. Other information such as Student Code of Conduct, Children on Campus Policy, Computer Usage, Grievance Policies, Emergency Student Contact Policy, Equal Opportunity, and Plagiarism/Scholastic Dishonesty for which students are responsible can be located in the "Student Responsibility and Regulations" section in the college's eCatalog located through the home webpage.

Student Responsibilities

Students are expected to read the weekly materials, take the weekly quizzes, participate in the weekly class discussions and other communications as required (ref. desk attendance and diary), all in a timely manner--in the week specified. In addition, students must take the final and turn in the observation diary before the end of the semester.

Students should immediately inform the instructor if they are ill or otherwise incapacitated. (Adjustments can be made if I know what's happening.--Colby)

In addition, students are to look up any words they do not understand in the dictionary and begin developing a professional vocabulary. They should also use the tools and links provided, taking careful notes in preparation for the weekly quiz.

 

There are two accepted ways to recall information useful to you. One is memory. Aristotle tells the story of Simonides, a man who could remember all the guests murdered at his banquet by the places where they sat in the destroyed building. Your "place" or "location" memory, for some reason, is much better than other types of memory. (For instance, although you may have been gone a long time, you can still remember all the details of the house in which you grew up.) This placement mnemonic method was expanded in the early Middle Ages to the so-called "Cathedral of memory." The technique was to construct in your mind a vivid picture of a cathedral (like your home), every room, every piece of furniture, every picture on the wall, everything. Then, when you wanted to remember something, you would relate (mentally attach) the items to the items in your mental cathedral. The vividness of the place memory would facilitate your retaining the list of items or whatever you needed to retain.

The other method, used since antiquity, is note-taking. Not only does the act of note-taking facilitate the retention of material, but you also have the notes to take with you and review while you are traveling, waiting, or otherwise wasting time.

Read about the science of learning at Memrise Science under each of the three principles, click on "Learn more"

On a more general note, "... it has been abundantly proved that there is no more effective means of strengthening the mind than by the earnest pursuit of [the Latin language] (D'ooge, p. 4). Check the previous link for more information on Latin and free learniing materials and books.

 

STUDENT COMMUNICATIONS ASSESSMENT

Students will be assessed on the following three areas:

-Content and Purpose-The student uses relevant content that conveys understanding to the audience or reader.

-Organization-The student uses conventions unique to the discipline for organizing and presenting content. If the student should organize the assignment according to a particular disciplinary convention, please indicate this on the assignment.

-Tools-The student uses communication tools appropriately and skillfully for academic and professional contexts i.e. Written Assignments-grammar or punctuation, Oral assignments-eye contact or fluency, and Visual-high quality techniques or color contrasts.

Students will be assessed in the Discussions area of Canvas. 4 is excellent, 3 is good, 2 is needs improvement, 1 is inadequate. For more detailed information on grading, see Student Communications Skills

 

Professor Responses & Communications

I normally check this course on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at a minimum. You can expect answers to your emails and Discussions questions accordingly. If technical difficulties or other stresses to the class arise, I will check on things much more frequently. If you have a need, please contact me at cglass@alamo.edu or call me at 210-561-7905.

Most questions you will have, other students in the class will also have. For that reason, I ask that you ask those questions in the discussions area so that all the other students can see the questions and answers. Some students, in fact, may have better answers than I do. If your question or comment is very personal, then by all means use email.

 

COLLEGE POLICIES:

Disability Access Statement - It is the student's responsibility to self-identify with the appropriate office to receive an evaluation of accommodations and services in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Only those students with appropriate documentation will receive a letter of accommodation from the DSS office. The DSS office will also forward a copy of the letter of accommodation to the student's instructor(s). Instructors are required to follow only those accommodations outlined in the letter of accommodation. For further information, please contact 210-486-3020 or online at Disability Support Services. If you have specific needs, please discuss them with your instructor.

For technical problems call Support Central at 210-486-3777.

 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE SUBJECT MATTER OF EACH LECTURE OR DISCUSSION:

The semester for Summer 2015 runs from June 8th through July 31 (8 weeks).

Orientation for the Summer 2015 online Introduction to Reference class is on Monday, June 8th, at 6:30 pm in room 139 of the Ozuna (library/LRC) building. Attendance is mandatory. If you are unable to attend, please email Professor Glass at cglass@alamo.edu and explain.

Week One-Orientation and Introduction to Reference Services June 8-14, 2015 : Attend the orientation session, and email the instructor. By the end of the week, each student must take an online syllabus and orientation quiz that covers the materials found in those readings. You must also complete the required course work for Week One. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 1 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Two-The Catalog, June 15-21, 2015 : We (the class and professor) will study the components of the catalog, and insure that everyone knows how to do the various basic searches. We will also touch on the Library of Congress Classification System, and insure that everyone is familiar with it and how to use it. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 2 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Three-Dictionaries and Encyclopedias, June 22-28, 2015: We will discuss the general characteristics of dictionaries and encyclopedias, and the various kinds of dictionaries and encyclopedias. We will complete assignments and assessments concerning the use of dictionaries and encyclopedias. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 3 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Four-Almanacs, Yearbooks and Handbooks, June 29 - July 5, 2015 : We will learn about the general characteristics of almanacs, yearbooks and handbooks. We will study some of the specific kinds of each, and will complete assignments and assessments concerning that information. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 4 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Five- Geographical and Biographical Sources, July 6-12, 2015 : We will learn about specific geographical and biographical reference sources. We will complete assignments and assessments concerning those reference sources. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 5 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Six-Government Documents, Directories and Bibliographic Sources; July 13-19, 2015 : We will learn some of the basics about government documents, directories and bibliographic sources. We will complete assignments and assessments relating to these topics. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 6 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Seven-Electronic Reference Sources, July 20-26, 2015 : We will learn about and use some of the electronic databases and other electronic sources of information for information services. We will have some assignments and assessments regarding these sources. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 7 quiz. Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.

Week Eight- The Reference Process and Final July 27-31, 2015 (note this week ends early) : We will review the reference process, the reference interview, and various links on the reference interview. There will be both a quiz and the final this week--all early. Go to Assessments in Canvas and take Wk 8 quiz Then do Discussions. Answer any exercises in the readings in Discussions.. Then take the final. Note again that the week is short due to college and district scheduling requirements. Give yourself plenty of time by starting early on the quiz and the final. I will need to turn in the grades at the end of that week. Remember that you can take all exams again and again if you wish to raise your grade. The highest grade will be recorded.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Brief description of each major course requirement, including each major assignment and examination.

Read all unit materials online.
Take weekly tests and respond to Canvas questions and Discussions.
Do class exercises and place answers in Canvas Discussions
Take quizzes and exams in Canvas.
Do the reference desk observations; report in Canvas discussions (3-4 screens long).
Take the final in Canvas.

 

Course Assignments and Grading Policies

Course assignments include reading the material under each week, reading the links included, responding to each week's Canvas discussions and exercises, and taking the quizzes and the final.

Grading Policies:

A = 90-100
B = 80-89
C = 70-79
D = 60-69
F = below 60

Any grade below a C for the semester is unacceptable for the program certificate. The course will have to be repeated.

Semester grade includes:

30% = Average of weekly quizzes (can take over until you are satisfied with your grade)
30% = Reference Observation (5 hours and report) due well before end of semester
30% = Adequate communication and involvement with the class and answering online questions and exercises ("Discussions" ; at least ten entries--plus the exercises and the reference observation)
7% = Final (can take over until you are satisfied with your grade)
3% = Communications Skills (Prof. Glass will grade during semester; review standards often)

Late assignments--which includes class participation and weekly quizzes--will have one point deducted for every day they are late unless previous arrangements have been made with me.

 

Technical Requirements, Downloads

In order to view certain multimedia elements and documents on the Web, you need specific plug-ins. The most popular plug-ins are QuickTime, Real, Flash, Shockwave, and Acrobat Reader, and they are all freely downloadable.

Get QuickTime Player for Apple and MacIntosh machines,

or Get Real Player for PC machines.

Get Acrobat Reader.

Get the Flash Player.

Get Shockwave.

If you do not have Office or another Word document processor, Open Office is free for download at Open Office Download.

If you have technical difficulties, call the PAC Help Desk at 210-486-3777. Also, please let me know if you are having problems.

 

Students with Disabilities

Disability Support Services or call 210-486-3020 or 210-486-3025. To call using a TTY, dial 711 or 1-800-735-2989

 

Instructor Vitae Information

Retired, Spring 2009.

Awarded Professor Emeritus status by the ACC Board shortly thereafter at least in part for the following accomplishments:

Hired in fall of 1989. Promoted to full time tenure track in Spring, 1990. Promoted to full professor 1995. (18 years).

Won the NISOD award in 1994 for team teaching with Ellen Shull in English.

Won a $4 million dollar NEH Challenge Grant in 1994. Was not funded due to federal budget cut backs.

For the first ten years also taught Philosophy as an adjunct (in addition to full time in the library) at PAC.

Developed and maintained the PAC LRC website since 1998 (10 years).

Part of the first group of faculty at PAC to receive Internet Certification to teach online in 1999.

Has taught information literacy since 1992 until now. (23 years)

Was a Summer Fellow at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in 1993.

Served as secretary of the Faculty Senate in 1995-6.

Helped develop the Information Research Certificate program in 2000. It later became an Achieving the Dream initiative.

Recipient of the Department of Education Success Grant for Spring, 2002.

In 2003 began developing the Library Technology Assistant program, an Occ/Tech program, which is now a successful online certificate and academic degree program. (The academic program was discontinued in Summer, 2015)

Recipient of the GROW Award for the highest percentage increase of graduates in Palo Alto College for the Library Technology Assistant program in 2007-8.

Served 12 years as chair of the teaching faculty in the LRC: 1997-2008.

Retirement hobby is ancient comparative linguistics, especially studying the classics in English, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew.

 

Higher Education Institutions Attended and degree(s) earned:

North Texas State University. BA in English and Latin.
Trinity University. ABD for MA in Philosophy.
Universtiy of Texas at Austin. MLIS in Library Science.
University of Texas at Austin. ABD for PhD in Higher Education

 

"Ne discere cessa."
Never stop learning.



Colby Glass, MLIS, Professor Emeritus