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Why Go To College


"Going to college is one of the good things of American life. For many people, it is the first time they are really challenged by ideas; it is the time they look back on as the most exciting, significant, and enjoyable in their lives" (Deese & Deese 1994, 1).

On the other hand... "unless you are willing to make your college years count, you might be better off doing something else" (Deese & Deese 1994, 1) ... ie., if you are going for no particular reason or just because your parents expect you to go, you will probably learn more and grow more getting a job.


Think about your own priorities...


Rate Yourself

College demands a lot more abilities and work than high school. Try this test from Deese and Deese (1994, 3):

 

Self-Rating of Traits and Abilities

In the spaces below, check where you honestly think you stand on the traits and abilities listed. After you have done that, discuss your ratings with some other people who know you really well -- students, friends, parents, counselors -- and who might show you where you have overestimated or underestimate yourself.
In my school, I think am in the---
Upper
Fifth
Middle
Three-
Fifth
Lower
Fifth
 
      in speed of reading textbooks
      in ability to understand textbooks
      in ability to take notes
      in general preparation for college
      in amount of time I study
      in not wasting time
      in work habits
      in vocabulary (words I know & use)
      in grammar and punctuation
      in spelling
      in mathematical skills

 

Counselors can help you consider your abilities and your potential.


COLLEGE IS BIG BUSINESS

Your decision to go to college is a particularly smart ECONOMIC choice. Over your working career you will, if average, earn $600,000 more than a person with only a high school education.

Let's see how that breaks down...

$600,000 divided by 4 years = $150,000

divided by 2 semesters = $75,000

divided by 15 weeks = $5,000

divided by 5 days/wk. = $1,000 each day

Say WHAT?

You heard correctly..

$1,000 every day!

COLLEGE IS BIG BUSINESS, SO RUN IT LIKE ONE...


So, let's review... WHY GO TO SCHOOL?

Happiness... Research shows that the boss is always happier. The reason is that he feels that he is in control of his life.

So, be in control of your life. Get an education!


The Value of Higher Education to Society

The following information is taken from Leslie, Larry L., and Paul T. Brinkman. The Economic Value of Higher Education. NY: Macmillan, 1988.

For every $1 spent on a college, a total of $3 of wealth is generated in the economy (Leslie & Brinkman 90-1).

This return breaks down as follows:

For the student, the annualized internal rate of return on investment in a Bachelor's degree is up to 13.4% per annum (11).

For the public/state, the annualized internal rate of return on investment in undergraduate education is around 12.1% per annum (11).

Overall, education causes 50% or more of the growth in the economy. Higher education contributes almost half of that (82).

For the local community, every dollar in a community college's budget results in $1.60 of local business volume being created. For each $1 million in the college's budget, 59 jobs are created (13; 71).

The social rate of return (taxes paid) is 12.1% per annum. And this does not include spillover, i.e., benefits to others (71; 75).

In addition, there are fringe benefits:

To what degree is college cost an obstacle? For every $100 increase in tuition costs, first-time student enrollment drops .7% (124-5). A $100 decrease in tuition, however, results in a 1.8% increase in enrollment (155).

Public investments should be increased where social returns are the greatest (184). If investment in higher education is allowed to stagnate, state and local economies will be reduced (185).

Higher education is not an expense, it is a high-yielding investment which makes a better economy possible.

For more on why society should be paying for your education,
see: Why Higher Education Should Be Free.

(Note that higher education and many of the accompanying expenses
are FREE in Germany and several other European countries. Check it out! -C.Glass (5/21/15)

 


NEXT: How to Succeed in College?


REFERENCES

Caverly, David C., and Vincent P. Orlando. "Textbook Study Strategies." In Rona F. Flippo & David C. Caverly (eds.), Teaching Reading and Study Strategies At the College Level. Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association, 1991.

Deese, James, & Deese, Ellin K. (eds.). (1994). How to Study and Other Skills for Success in College. 4th ed. NY: McGraw-Hill.

Ehrlich, Eugene H. How to Study Better and Get Higher Marks. NY: Ty Crowell Co., 1976. ISBN 0690011814.

Farber, Barry. How to Learn Any Language, Quickly, Easily, Inexpensively, Enjoyably, and On Your Own. NY: Citadel Press, 1995.

Leslie, Larry L., and Paul T. Brinkman. The Economic Value of Higher Education. NY: Macmillan, 1988.

Simpson, Michele L, and Edward J. Dwyer. "Vocabulary Acquisition and the College Student." In Rona F. Flippo & David C. Caverly (eds.), Teaching Reading and Study Strategies At the College Level. Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association, 1991.


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Please send comments to: Colby Glass, MLIS

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