Akita


"Honored in their native land as a national treasure, Akitas are the largest of the 3 Japanese breeds belonging to the Spitz family of dogs. At one time only nobility were allowed to own these dogs. They were used to hunt large game like wild boar and deer and are a rugged, athletic breed. They stand 28" at the shoulder and can weigh 80 lbs. or more. These dogs need firm training and lots of exercise" (http://www.abcpets.com/dogsnew.html#A).

"...protective, courageous, and independent..

"..known as the Great Japanese Dog in Asia and Europe...

"Coat: Thick, dense undercoat and straight, harsh outer coat standing off the body... brush weekly; during bi-annual shedding brush daily.

"Activity level: Low to moderate.

"Akitas often behave more like cats than stereotypical dogs. "They reflect and understand your moods... They are quiet, dignified, majestic like a cat"...

"Akitas also move like big cats, with premeditated precision... because the Japanese, with their rice paper walls, had to have dogs that were very aware of what they were doing...

"Living with an Akita: More likely to know exactly where you are than to follow you everywhere demanding attention, the Akita's quiet nature and low exercise needs suit it to apartment life. Akitas need exercise but won't exercise on their own, so daily walks promote good health.

"Although Akitas rarely bark.. they vocalize often with a characteristic "woo-wooing" and love to carry things in their mouths...

"Bouyet says, "They will gently take your hand or wrist in their mouths to lead you to the leash or the cookie cupboard"...

"This is not a breed to take to the local dog park for ball throwing. They don't act like pack animals, and most of them are happy to be the only dog in the house...

"Bred to hunt and dispatch prey on their own, Akitas may be difficult to train. "This is not a breed for everyone," Wright says. "Untrained and under-socialized, they can be bad news. They need close supervision and no expectations that they will grow up to be a dog that can always mingle perfectly with other dogs or always do exactly what you say the moment you command it... They will work their hearts out for you if they see the relevance and a good paycheck and the activity is something that interests them, but as a rule, they hate repetition" (Adamson, Eve. "Japan's National Treasure." Dog Fancy, Nov. 2003, 46-51).


Links/Pictures:

Akita Club of America
Akita Rescue Society of America
Akita Inu


Colby Glass, MLIS