Yard Dogs


Outside Dog? Why?
Chaining Dogs causes child deaths
Dogs Deserve Better a nonprofit organization dedicated to freeing the chained dog, and bringing our 'best friend' into the home and family


Many people think that a dog belongs outside. They leave their dog in the backyard... and then are surprised when problems develop: continuous barking, digging, fence fighting, even viciousness...

"Dogs are an intensely social species. They are genetically not very well prepared to be alone for any length of time" (Jean Donaldson in Culture Clash, 1996, p. 49).

"It used to be thought that dogs needed mainly space, that it was the ideal life to be "on a farm" with "plenty of room to run." Now we know better. Dogs are not space-intensive; they are time-intensive. Given a choice between your time and a yard, virtually every dog on this earth will opt for more time hanging out with living beings" (Jean Donaldson in Culture Clash, 1996, p. 51).

"Boredom Barking can result when the dog's daily needs for exercise and social and mental stimulation aren't met. The dog barks compulsively because of boredom. This is very much like pacing back and forth, tail-chasing or self-mutilation. Dogs left outdoors in yards get into this one a lot" (Jean Donaldson in Culture Clash, 1996, p. 114).

"If you don't have time for a dog, don't get a dog. If you have an outside dog, do whatever housetraining, chewtraining and obedience training it takes to make him an inside dog" (Jean Donaldson in Culture Clash, 1996, p. 120).

"Dog owners in Wichita, Kan. can legally tie up their dogs outside -- for just one hour three times a day. The new law gives animal control officers another weapon in their war on animal cruelty and neglect... An owner violating the one-hour limit faces a fine of up to $500" ("Short Walks." Dog Fancy, Feb. 2004, 13).


Colby Glass, MLIS