DRINKS


Healthy Amount/ Wines/ Gins/ Mixers/ Rum

Rethink That Drink

Talk to your doctor if you drink alcohol. It can weaken your heart and make it work harder. Research does show that a little booze can raise your HDL (good) cholesterol level -- but too much can make you gain weight or raise your blood pressure.

If you are diabetic, The best options are a glass of red wine, or a Vodka Soda with lemon or lime. Vodka has less calories than dark alcohol and the citrus fruit is a natural insulin desensitizer. A Vodka with club soda and lime is a far better option than a margarita which is loaded with sweet sour mix and calorie dense tequila. The average margarita has 400 calories - while a Vodka Soda with lime has less than 100 total calories! [from the Type II Diabetes Destroyer]


GINS:

Favorites:

1. Seagram's Extra Dry Gin. $12 for 750mL bottle. ABV 40%. Mild flavor. Inexpensive. Traditional London dry. has a light citrus tang with a hint of spices, over a solid but refined base of juniper. Seagram’s Gin is the best selling gin in America. http://theginisin.com/gin-reviews/seagrams-extra-dry/ Review from theginisin.com: It tastes rather sweet. This is the first thing that I noticed, even though at similar proof to most gins (40%) it tastes much lighter and much easier to drink than most gins, but still retains a lot of classic gin flavor. (2 1/2 stars). My favorite mild gin. Got at Gabriels. 2 olives and very dirty. Neat it is quite sweet.

2. Tanqueray London Dry Gin. $16 for 750mL bottle. ABV 47%. Traditional London dry. Very strong Juniper taste. "Primary flavors of angelica, juniper, and coriander, Tanqueray London Dry has won countless awards." http://theginisin.com/gin-reviews/tanqueray/ It's distilled in Scotland, and has been made more or less in its current incarnation since the 1830s. It is a classic and as expected it has a strong bite of juniper with a hint of acid sharpness. One olive and no dirty. Taste comes through better. Got at Gabriels.

3. Beefeater London Dry Gin. $19 for 750mL bottle. ABV: 47%. Traditional / London Dry. Little flavor with olive and ice. Strong smell of alcohol. Much better neat; no ice, no olive.

 

The Best Gin to Buy on a Budget Seagram's Extra Dry (Seagram's makes a very nice gin and tonic or gimlet, and it plays well in gin cocktails that call for citrus, such as a Gin Daisy or an Aviation. If you're trying it in a martini, be careful with the vermouth: this 80-proofer will need less vermouth than, say, a gin at 94-proof. It's not quite assertive enough to make a good Negroni—it gets lost between the Campari and the vermouth), Seagram's Distiller's Reserve (actually an aged gin.. this tastes likes a drier, pinier version of the classic Seagram's. It has a smooth and creamy texture, and tastes less citrusy and more spicy than the Extra Dry. The Distiller's Reserve has flavors of clove and peppercorn), Burnett's (The flavor is fresh, piney, and citrusy, with a mild and pleasant salinity. The finish lingers, though the gin's astringency really dried out my mouth, and that alone might be too much for some drinkers... Mix Burnett's into something citrusy (or a good ol' G&T), and avoid the martini; this gin isn't quite assertive enough for that drink), New Amsterdam Straight (New Amsterdam is not your standard gin. It's designed to be especially smooth, creamy, and citrusy, meant to appeal to people who are new to gin. And to be sure, it smells mostly lemony, with no pine aromas. The flavor is mostly orange and lemon, with very little juniper punch), Gilbey's ( a good classic London dry at a compelling price point... in a martini and also a Negroni, though it would also work in citrusy cocktails, such as gimlets, sours, and fizzes. It's neither the biggest nor most complex gin available, but it's surprisingly good), Honorable Mention: Lord Astor (

The Best Gin for a Martini #1--Ford's Gin... Tasters preferred the Ford's martini for its impressive balance and also ranked it highest in terms of preferred aroma and taste, noting the drink's bright pine, peppercorn, lemon, coriander, grapefruit, and orange flavors. #2--Beefeater: The Floral Martini. #5--Bombay Sapphire: The Savory Martini... The Sapphire martini seemed less sweet and more savory to most tasters, offering lots of juniper, lemon, hay, and herbal flavors, along with citrus peel and a hint of salinity. One taster praised the Sapphire martini for having a little more hefty weight, and another loved its "nice, cool lingering finish."

GIN HEALTH BENEFITS Gin is a very interesting and healthy drink. Gin is the only alcohol liquor that was first developed as medicine remedy before it became popular as a social drink. Gin has many health benefits... I inform my customers if you want to drink hard liquor, choose Gin over Vodka, Whiskey or Rum. And if you don't want the calories in beer and wine, TRY A GIN DRINK ! you can have almost nine raisins per day and you can see the Gin Health benefits with this for arthritis... is very good source of losing weight. It helps to fight against the obesity. Drinking Gin helps you to have stronger and healthy bones. This in turn helps you to reduce cardiovascular diseases... Gin also helps you in having great water retention in your body. This Gin Health benefit is due to the juniper berries which are present and acts as a herbal remedy for the diseases of kidney and liver. They have a diuretic action and here Gin helps in passing more water than any other alcohol.

Old Tom Gin

Imbibe: Liquid Culture magazine

Why You Should Buy Tanqueray's New Old Tom Gin

Health Benefits

Guide to Gin In some ways, you can think of gin as a juniper-flavored vodka. Gin is a colorless, usually unaged, spirit. It's ordinarily made by distilling or redistilling fermented grains with juniper berries and other aromatics (also known as botanicals). Juniper berries are a natural diuretic... During the Dutch War of Independence (1568–1648; also known as the Eighty Years War), English forces in Holland discovered gin and enjoyed it before battle. The English dubbed gin "Dutch courage." Gin became so popular among English troops that they brought it back with them after the war. Comments: Nolet's is a beautiful and expensive gin. I've been doing a lot of tastings for my martinis (ie. picking up another bottle) and its a favorite if you have the cash. I would say for the money The Botanist gin is a best buy. Similar aromas to Nolet's but almost half the price. -- The Botanist is my new favorite, complex and smooth. --Ransom Old Tom gin is fantastic. -- even better with bitter lemon!. --Right now I am enamored with St George's Terroir gin but I also picked up the Botanist and can't recommend it enough. --

GIN HEALTH BENEFITS Gin is a very interesting and healthy drink. Gin is the only alcohol liquor that was first developed as medicine remedy before it became popular as a social drink. Gin has many health benefits... I inform my customers if you want to drink hard liquor, choose Gin over Vodka, Whiskey or Rum. And if you don't want the calories in beer and wine, TRY A GIN DRINK ! you can have almost nine raisins per day and you can see the Gin Health benefits with this for arthritis... is very good source of losing weight. It helps to fight against the obesity. Drinking Gin helps you to have stronger and healthy bones. This in turn helps you to reduce cardiovascular diseases... Gin also helps you in having great water retention in your body. This Gin Health benefit is due to the juniper berries which are present and acts as a herbal remedy for the diseases of kidney and liver. They have a diuretic action and here Gin helps in passing more water than any other alcohol.

Failed:

Gilbey's Gin. Good price. ABV 40%. $9 for 750mL bottle. Mild with floral overtones. Plastic bottle. Too cheap and tasteless. Maybe try neat?

 

Trying Out:

Bombay Sapphire Gin. $25 for 750mL bottle. ABV: 47%. "This is a complex gin; more flavors can be detected with each sip: cinnamon spice, astringent pine needles, a touch of lime zest and, finally, a big licorice finish comes singing through." http://theginisin.com/gin-reviews/bombay-sapphire/ This is the second most widely drunk gin in the world today. Not at Gabriels.

Aviation Gin. $30-35 for 750mL. 42% ABV. Not at Gabriels. It’s truly one of the new breed of American Dry. It is big and bold, but with the juniper in the background. It’s more of the bassist in this band. The citrus and the other flavors are in the front. This is a diverse gin, and don’t let the strong bouquet fool you. It makes for a stunning Tom Collins, a refreshing gin and tonic, and yes- a classic Aviation. But one thing that raises Aviation gin to the next level is its smoothness and complexity. It is a gin that you can sip neat or on the rocks, and not be left wanting. Its a great gin in martinis all around. Rating: Outstanding. a gin that has won its way on to my shelf and may prove to be a favorite going forward.

Captive Spirits’ Big Gin. $30-33 for 750mL. 47% ABV. Immediately, one noticed that the nose of Big Gin is strong and assertive. You can catch the sweet aroma of juniper as you pour the gin. The nose is sweet, a bit peppery. Lots of juniper, hints of citrus and peppercorn. The taste is a bit silky, even thick for a gin. It slides over the tongue, warming the mouth with a powerful burst of juniper.. overall, Big Gin is big on juniper. Rating: Lives up to its name beautifully. May not be available in Texas.

Ford's Gin. $25-31 for 1 liter. Proof: 90 = 45% ABV. Not at Gabriels. Juniper and bright spice on the nose, some floral hints as well. Mild, fresh, hints of lavender and cream on the close. Nice, smells a touch contemporary in style, but the presence of juniper is immediately detectable. The flavor is actually rich and thick. Rating: In terms of nationally/internationally available gins of this style, I think this is one of the best options out there: traditional enough for the purists; but has a couple of novel notes to appeal to folks who have got into gin via Hendrick’s and their ilk.

G’vine Nouaison. $35 / 750 mL. ABV: 44% ...this was the first gin I officially awarded five stars too. There’s some warm citrus notes a powerful note of cassia. The floral notes are there but very quickly give way to juniper and a burst of London Dry style heat. The finish is a little bit of ginger, a little bit of cinnamon and a little bit citrus.

Hendrick’s. $25-34 for 750ml. 44% ABV. Modern. Rating: I love this gin, and its one of my favorites. Hendrick’s has been one of my favorite gins since I was first introduced to the beverage. Its lighter on the Juniper, but it’s not completely absent. The high notes are cucumber and rose. Because of the unusual blend of flavors and their mildness, this gin I think is best served as straight gin with tonic.

Martin Miller’s Westbourne Strength London Dry Gin. $40 for 1 L. 90 proof/45% ABV. Five stars. Let me begin by getting this out of the way. This is my favorite gin. Hands down. The Miller’s regular strength (80 proof) is a solid choice, somewhat more inexpensive ($31-35 for 1 L). Miller’s gin balances a crisp clean Juniper flavor with a hint of Citrus sweetness. These two flavors are in such perfect harmony, that Miller’s is the epitome of versatility in gin. Whereas some gins are decidedly Citrus (Bluecoat) and others are about the Juniper (Tanqueray), this gin walks the line and is a good choice for whatever you drink of choice is. Despite the strength of the Westbourne (90 proof) it is remarkably smooth, and very drinkable straight. Availability: Criminally uncommon. Mostly higher end stores with a larger gin selection Rating: There’s few better gins out there.

Plymouth English Gin. $35-41/ 750 mL. 41% ABV. The flavors are not out of the ordinary for gin. There’s a strong citrus element and a strong juniper element. The flavor is smooth, but astringent. It has a bit of an oily lingering, but very pleasant mouth feel. Whereas many non-traditional gins don’t pair well with lime- Plymouth and Limes were meant to be in drinks together. In fact, as it is almost a classical example of gin it excels in almost any cocktail across the spectrum. I think that Plymouth has a direct comparison across the pond. Bluecoat Gin, which is considered an American Dry style also exhibits a similar orange/citrus and juniper profile. This is a perfect place to compare the difference between the two styles. Whereas, Plymouth feels smoother and cleaner and exhibits a strong juniper finish to compliment the citrus, Bluecoat goes for depth and and a different kind of complexity. Bluecoat feels less sharp and more citrus. Availability: Nearly everywhere. Rating: Superb, there are not many gins that are as common as Plymouth that are as good as Plymouth.

Vor Gin (pot distilled gin from Iceland). ~$42-52 for 500 mL. 94 proof/47% ABV. Terroir, the notion that place imbues the plants grown in a certain place with a unique character... a gin which is wholly unlike anything else out there. Vor means spring in Icelandic. Let’s start with the base spirit. 100% pot-distilled organic barley. Barley lends a distinct character to the base spirit that is rich, and grainy all on its own. The notes of the base are immediately recognizable, but they do not stop there. Upon it they distill local juniper. In addition they add local botanicals such as Crowberry, and more on this fruit below] and Iceland Moss [more type II and more on this again below]. In short, the combination of botanicals is unlike anything else you’ve ever seen in a gin, and you’re unlikely to have seen anywhere else before. That is unless you live in Iceland. Crowberries are native to the sub-arctic boreal regions around the world. The small purplish-black fruits... So how many gins have you had that have lichens in them? Tasting Notes: Immediately recognizable for having a strong grain based base. Very grainy, with a bright pot distilled character. Lots of depth in the mids, with sweet floral notes that are myriad and complex. In trying to tease it out, you get herbal hints, licorice, sour berry hame, thyme, oregano, angelica, and a pinch of ginger. Wow. Very complex.The palate is oily and thick, with a rich viscous mouthfeel. Juniper, grain, strawberry rhubarb, licorice, oregano, rosemary and thyme. There’s a sage-like richness, fading gently into notes of spearmint, leading to a long licorice and juniper finish.Very robust, bursting with flavor... an incredible gin, at this taste alone. I’m really blown away by the flavor, the richness and complexity. Rating: Rarely a gin comes along which is so complex and flavorful, with such depth and intrigue that you can cut it some slack for not working in a Tom Collins. It works everywhere else, and if this were more widely available, I’d probably always keep a bottle in stock in my home bar. Fans of heavier grain based gins or spice forward contemporary gins will love what they see here. Fans of the classic gin style might be surprised at first, but I believe if they give this gin a closer look they’ll find something here worth coming back to. Easily, one of our favorites of 2014. 5/5 stars.

Tanqueray's Old Tom Gin. ~$50 for 1 L. 47% ABV. Not at Gabriels. the same recipe as for our London Dry, but in higher proportions." - Tanqueray. This new Old Tom expression adds just a bit of residual sugar to the mix, creating a rounder, more supple palate; but without losing any of the herbaceous character Tanqueray is known for. With its old school packaging and liter-sized format.. Palate: Leads with piney juniper and sweet lime but is impeccably balanced by licorice, black pepper, and the tropical fruits of the wheat spirit.

The Botanist Gin. $30-43 for 750mL. 46% ABV. Good as Nolet's but half the price. Not at Gabriels. $43 for 750mL. It’s a limited run (only 15,000 bottles)... distilled at the well known and respected Bruichladdich distillery in Islay which is best known for its whiskeys and the unique terroir that Hebrides brings to their creations. Neat, it was complex. There was a lot going on in there, but almost so much that you couldn’t really say that “this was in there,” or it felt like “this kind of gin.” Sipping, it has a vaguely vegetable like flavor, but juniper stands out. Side by side with other gins the Botanist when sipped neat doesn’t really taste all too different. It’s not as smooth as other gins at this price point, but that bouquet. I keep coming back to the scent. It is delightful and harmonious, but it’s a shame that those flavors don’t stand out when sipped. Rating: Good, but hard to recommend above other high-end gins. Nose: Leads with piney juniper and sweet lime but is impeccably balanced by licorice, black pepper, and the tropical fruits. Taste: The taste is rich and mellow; cool on entry then as it reaches the back palate you can feel the warmth and absolute purity of slow unhurried distillation. This is a bewitching, delectable and luxurious gin.

Ransom Old Tom Gin. $38 for 750mL?. ABV: 44%. Not at Gabriels. Category Genevere. Ransom Old Tom Gin is a genevere, which is officially defined as a gin made in the Netherlands or Belgium, where the spirit originated. The name genevere originated from the juniper plant (its also where the spirit gets its name). This Old Tom Gin is a historically accurate revival of the predominant Gin in fashion during the mid 1800's and the golden age of American cocktails.. dating from the days before prohibition. Pale amber pink color. ”This is an amazing gin, caramel colored, complex, rich flavors.. to rich for a martini, this is gin for scotch lovers....”

St. George's Terroir. $35 for 750mL... $12 for 200mL. ABV unknown. Not at Gabriels. Terroir Gin might be among the strongest, most aromatic gins that I’ve encountered. Simply uncorking the bottle, one can smell the vibrant aromas of the terroir gin [note, while writing this review my wife could smell it from halfway across the room, a testament to the strong scent]. On the taste, you get a strong dose of fir and juniper, as well as an herbaceous counterpoint. Something like Fennel. Hints of citrus lead to a long lasting herbaceous finish [notes that remind me or Rosemary, Bay Leaf, and Sage]. Rating: Memorable, enjoyable and unique. Although probably not for those who have not embraced their inner love affair with juniper, those who have might have found a new favorite.

St George’s Dry Rye Gin. $35 / 750 mL. Five stars! But then we have the outliers, the gins that use a neutral-in-definition-only base alcohol spirit: Grape from G’vine and Seneca Drums; and the Whiskey/Rye style base of gins like Smooth Ambler’s and St George’s Dry Rye Gin... Why might these great gins not win over every gin-drinker? Well because I think in taste and mouthfeel they resemble a nice Genever more than your average gin, and possibly even a White Whiskey. Are they gin? Most definitely. But sometimes I wonder if there needs to be another category of gin unto itself. I’ve already said that I don’t think “New Western” is a style as its just a contemporary spin on an already classic formula. But are these gins, which err towards a more whiskey like base? I really really enjoy this gin. The first thing that is noticeable on the nose is a distinct malty character, with peppercorn and caraway notes clear and up front. The taste is a whole different world, a warm malty texture and a vivid burst of juniper. While not aged, it truly tasted woodsy and dense. There’s a faint hint of candied, almost burnt citrus fruit, and then a long rye and juniper finish. Stunning and quite memorable. Availability: New York and California. Rating: A fantastic rye base gin. Among the best gins I’ve had.

Gordon's Gin. $11 for 750mL. ABV 40%. See note below. 80 proof. Not at Gabriels. Given its status as one of the most senior gins out there [having been produced since 1769!]. Nose is heavy with pine-laden juniper, with a peppery/resinous undertone. Coriander lurking on the edges as well, with a slight hint or citrus and a menthol character. Quintessentially classic. The palate is more of the same. Bright piny juniper, with hints of coriander, lemon zest. The finish is medium-long in length with an unmistakable juniper burst, but there’s some complexities and complications which emerge that challenge the notion that Gordon’s is a one-note gin. Certainly on its own, you can pick up a lot of depth and character, though I find that some of these intriguing low-notes are lost mixing. I’m sorry for my friends in the UK, but the variant of Gordon’s bottled at 37.5% ABV is rubbish. It tastes of watered down gin, and much of the nuance is lost. Frankly, that lower ABV variant was among my first tastes of Gordon and I was not impressed by it. I’ve grown to appreciate how vastly superior the 40% ABV variation we’re fortunate enough to have in North America is, while I think that the 47.3% ABV export variation is superior in terms of appreciating the botanical nuance, I find that while it mixes better [owing to its strength], it doesn’t read as clearly as Gordon’s Gin. In short, I prefer the 40% bottling and the 47.3% Export Strength if you can find it. Availability: Worldwide, though the 40% ABV offering is North America: Canada and the United States Rating: Classic gin doesn’t get much more classic than this. Fans of traditional styles are probably already fans of this gin and don’t need my words to convince them to pick up a bottle. It’s a solid buy, especially at its price point.

Blue Coat. $25 for 75oml. ABV unknown. Good review. Not at Gabriels. The case of Bluecoat, the “American Dry Gin” is an interesting one. It comes in a bright blue bottle and is sure to stand out on your shelf— one might say it is beaming with American pride. It’s made in Philadelphia and has a four grain base which includes corn, wheat, barley and rye. But really, all of this information isn’t going to help you. Let me some up this gin in one word: Citrus. You can taste the prickly warmth of the Juniper, but it is above all a citrusy gin. The strongest tasting notes are orange, orange, and maybe hits of lemon and lime. There’s also the slightest taste of clove or anise in there too, but in drinking and mixing this should be treated as a citrus gin above all. It is smooth, fragrant, and very drinkable. Where I think Bluecoat may come up short is appealing to the palette of traditional gin drinkers. Rating: A solid specialty gin that does somethings so well, I keep going back to it.

Genius Gin. $25/750 mL. 90 proof = 45% ABV. Made in Austin, Texas. Not at Gabriels. Unabashedly contemporary in construction, it uses a “hot and cold” process to bring out the best in its botanicals. Sweet spice on top, a tad malty, grainy and bright, Zesty. Mid notes reveal more traditional gin profile, with lemon zest and just a touch of ethanol. The palate reveals a pleasant, but never overwhelming warmth. Lime and citrus on top of the palate, but that fades nearly as quickly as it came on. The palate is dominated by sweet spicy notes: subdued rose, juniper, floral qualities, which crystallize more clearly on the finish. Hints of grass, a good deal of caradmom, citrus, lime and lavender. Availability: Only in Texas so far. Rating: Intriguing, contemporary and memorable. Works well in a lot of cocktails, and has depth and complexity that will bring folks to it neat as well.

Perry’s Tot Navy Strength Gin. $32/ 750 mL. 114 Proof = 57% ABV. So expect a punch on the nose and on the palate. The nose has a nice gin like stability, juniper, orange and a hint of cinnamon. The taste is acutely juniper based, but there’s some levels of depth. The early taste leads strongly with citrus, and then mid palate cinnamon, juniper and a peculiar floral sweetness. Rating: Bold and memorably flavored without being too overpowering. One of the finest Navy Strength gins I’ve had and one which I would recommend with no reservations.

Plymouth Sloe Gin. $32 for ? 26% ABV. A shot of Plymouth Sloe Gin costs approximately $1.89, about average for gin. Plymouth Sloe Gin is based on an 1883 recipe, and has since become an important part in various classic cocktails, notably the Sloe Gin fizz. The result is a smooth liqueur taste with a beautiful balance between sweet and bitter fruit flavours, and a hint of almonds from the stone of the fruit. Palate - fruity, smooth and full-bodied with a balanced sweetness and dryness.


Gin Ratings

Gin Reviews

Alcohol proof is a measure of how much ethanol (alcohol) is contained in an alcoholic beverage. The term was originally used in the United Kingdom and was defined as 7/4 times the alcohol by volume (ABV). The UK now uses the ABV standard instead of alcohol proof.

What 'proof' on a liquor bottle really means In the U.S., if you cut the number in half, you get the actual amount of alcohol in the bottle. Eighty proof means 40 percent of the liquid in the bottle is alcohol... Suspicious buyers came up with a “gunpowder proofing” testing method. They mixed the whiskey with gunpowder and lit it. If the gunpowder exploded, the liquor had no water in it and it was “proofed.” And so was anyone standing nearby. This became the official term for pure whiskey.

Sloe Gin a red liqueur made with gin and sloe (blackthorn) drupes, which are a small fruit relative of the plum. Sloe gin has an alcohol content between 15 and 30 percent by volume. However, the European Union has established a minimum of 25% ABV for sloe gin to be named as such.[1] The traditional way of making sloe gin is to soak the sloes in gin. Sugar is required to ensure the sloe juice is extracted from the fruit. (In Germany and other German-speaking countries, Schlehenlikör is made by soaking sloes, sugar, and possibly some spices in vodka, gin or rum. The most popular commercial brand, based on white rum, is made by Mast-Jägermeister SE)

What Exactly is Sloe Gin? Sloes are little berries, about the size of a dime, that grow wild in hedgerows all over England. One reason you might never have heard of sloes is that they're not widely cultivated, because they taste terrible. Ripe sloes may be lovely to look at, but their taste is highly astringent and generally unpleasant... But our compatriots across the sea are an inventive sort, and they came up with a way to make the sloes useful: soak them in booze. The Brits have been making sloe gin for hundreds of years by infusing the berries in high-proof gin, along with a little bit of sugar. The result is a liqueur that's tart, but with a delicious richness and depth of flavor.... Sloe gin was traditionally drunk in the depths of winter, as a warming drink, until the Americans got a hold of it and summer-ified it with citrus and soda water. Thus was born the Sloe Gin Fizz, arguably the most famous sloe gin cocktail out there. Until recently, when the Plymouth distillery decided to start making sloe gin again, the old-fashioned way: with sloe berries and gin. Now, even if your house is not conveniently situated to a hedgerow, you can still experience the uniquely rich taste of real sloe gin. The Plymouth can be a little hard to hunt down.

A Smart Way to Drink Gin GENIUS GIN, A NEW TEXAS SPIRIT, ARRIVES ON THE SCENE OFFERING A BEAUTIFUL BLEND OF BOTANICALS THAT WILL APPEAL TO THE DELICATELY REFINED PALATE.

Total Wine in SA SAN ANTONIO (DEL NORTE) 125 NW Loop 410 Ste 260 La Plaza Del Norte Shopping Center San Antonio, TX 78216 (210) 524-9300 4 Miles... http://www.totalwine.com/eng/categories/spirits/gin

Mother's Ruin Gin had become the poor man's drink as it was cheap, and some workers were given gin as part of their wages. Duty paid on gin was 2 pence a gallon, as opposed to 4 shillings and nine pence on strong beer. Gin rendered men impotent, and women sterile, and was a major reason why the birth rate in London at this time was exceeded by the death rate. The government of the day became alarmed when it was found that the average Londoner drank 14 gallons of spirit each year! Much of the gin was drunk by women, consequently the children were neglected, daughters were sold into prostitution, and wet nurses gave gin to babies to quieten them. This worked provided they were given a large enough dose! People would do anything to get gin…a cattle drover sold his eleven-year-old daughter to a trader for a gallon of gin, and a coachman pawned his wife for a quart bottle. Gin was the opium of the people, it led them to the debtors' prison or the gallows, ruined them, drove them to madness, suicide and death, but it kept them warm in winter, and allayed the terrible hunger pangs of the poorest. In 1736 a Gin Act was passed which forbade anyone to sell 'Distilled spirituous liquor' without first taking out a licence costing £50. In the seven years following 1736, only three £50 licences were taken out, yet the gallons of gin kept coming. On the last night, as the last gallons of gin were sold off cheaply by the retailers who could not afford the duty, more alcohol was drunk than ever before or since. The authorities believed there would be trouble the following day but nothing happened. The mob lay insensible in the streets, too drunk to know or care.


Mixers

Negroni equal parts gin, sweet (Rosso) vermouth, and campari over ice. As the story goes, the drink was invented in 1919 when Count Camillo Negroni wanted a little muscle in his Americano. He asked a bartender in Florence to forget the club soda and add gin in its place. The result: a serious drink for serious drinkers. three basic types of gin: a junipery London dry style, a more floral style, and a Navy strength (114 proof, or 57% alcohol by volume). The London dry is a bit of a benchmark. Tanqueray (Juniper--classic London style), Hendrick's (floral--cucumber), Nolet's Silver Dry Gin (roses and berries), Plymouth, Royal Dock, and Perry's Tot (Navy strength, piney flavors). The Perry's Tot was definitely juniper-forward, with light citrusy flavors and a little floral sweetness. The Hendrick's had a milder juniper flavor, and it tasted fresher and less sweet than the Perry's Tot. The flavors were clean and soft, with hints of rose petals and that famous cucumber. The Tanqueray had the biggest flavors of the three, strong with juniper, plus a light citrus flavor, tasting somewhat of orange blossom. We also tasted something akin to anise in the Tanq. —the favorite—was made with Perry's Tot

Campari Campari was invented in 1860 by Gaspare Campari in Novara, Italy. It was originally coloured with carmine dye, derived from crushed cochineal insects, which gave the drink its distinctive red colour. In 2006, Gruppo Campari ceased using carmine in its production... The company required bars that bought Campari to display the Campari Bitters sign.

Cinzano Cinzano is an Italian brand of vermouth, a brand owned since 1999 by Gruppo Campari.[1] It comes in four versions: Cinzano Rosso,[2] which is amber-coloured;[3] Cinzano Bianco, which is white and drier than Rosso, yet still considered a sweet vermouth;[3] Cinzano Extra Dry, a dry vermouth;[3] Cinzano Rosé, the newest of the four, rosy-coloured with orange highlights[3]... Cinzano vermouths date back to 1757 and the Turin herbal shop of two brothers, Giovanni Giacomo and Carlo Stefano Cinzano, who created a new "vermouth rosso" (red vermouth) using "aromatic plants from the Italian Alps in a [still-secret] recipe combining 35 ingredients (including marjoram, thyme, and yarrow)".[2] What became known as the "vermouth of Turin" proved popular with the bourgeoisie of Turin and, later, Casanova.

Aperol Aperol is an Italian aperitif made of bitter orange, gentian, rhubarb, and cinchona among other ingredients... Aperol was originally produced by the Barbieri company, based in Padua, but is now produced by the Campari company. While Aperol was originally created in 1919, it did not become successful until after World War II.[1] Although it tastes and smells much like Campari, Aperol has an alcohol content of 11%—less than half of Campari. Aperol and Campari have the same sugar content.[2] However, Aperol is milder and less bitter. Campari is also much darker in color. Aperol to be sold in Germany has an alcohol content of 15% to avoid German container deposit legislation regulations. Spritz, an aperitif cocktail, is often made using Aperol.

5 Essential Campari Cocktails If you've never had Campari, the bright red liquid masks a surprise. This bittersweet stuff is definitely an acquired taste. I suspect nearly everyone grimaces the first time they try it, but that's no reason to give up. Campari cocktails are richly rewarding once you come around. Because they're long on flavor, you can generally savor them, letting them linger in your glass and on your mind.

5 Essential Fernet Branca Cocktails that mentholated scent, the sweet richness. It's oddly bitter and syrupy,

Have You Tried These Other Fernets?

5 Essential Bourbon Cocktails Old Fashioned--2 ounces bourbon or rye whiskey (use something good, but not over-the-top), 1 teaspoon superfine sugar (or 1 sugar cube), 2-3 dashes of bitters; Angostura is traditional and works well; Fee Brothers’ Whiskey Barrel-Aged Old Fashioned Bitters are better. Whiskey Sour-- 2 ounces whiskey, 1 ounce fresh-squeezed lemon juice, 1 teaspoon sugar. Mint Julep-- 2 to 3 ounces bourbon, to taste, 1 teaspoon sugar, to taste, dissolved in 1 teaspoon water (or use 2 tsp. simple syrup), 8 to 10 leaves fresh mint, Mint sprigs, for garnish, Crushed ice

05 Essential Tequila Cocktails Margarita, Sangrita (Sangrita's not so much a cocktail as it is an accompaniment to tequila. The idea is, you take a sip of tequila and then a sip of sangrita.), Agavoni (with Campari),

5 Essential Rum Cocktails daiquiri, Hurricane ( dark and rich Jamaican rum, passion fruit syrup, and lemon juice), Mai Tai, Mojito, Planter's Punch

5 Essential Highballs Gin and Tonic, Paloma Brava (has grapefruit juice), Cuba Libre, Dark and Stormy, Pimm's Cup

5 Essential Gin Cocktails Martini, Martinez (start with equal parts gin and sweet vermouth, add a teaspoon of maraschino liqueur and a dash of either Angostura or orange bitters), Negroni, Gimlet ( a mix of gin (or vodka) and Rose's lime cordial. Some bartenders now make a fresher version using homemade lime cordial, lime juice, and gin. Both versions are crisp and refreshing; which version you prefer will largely depend on whether you value fresh juice in place of a bottled cordial), Jasmine

Drinks: Serious Eats


Rum

Too Good To Mix: 9 Rums Perfect For Sipping #1 Zacapa 23--Made in Guatemala, this medium-bodied rum needs a single cube of ice to mellow out the heavy charred layers of oak. When chilled and diluted a bit, Ron Zacapa 23 ($45 for 750mL) shines with delightful toasted almond and almost raspberry-like fruit flavor that mingles pleasingly with dry tannins. #2 Plantation 20th Anniversary XO--Plantation's rums are unique in that they're made and aged in various countries in the Caribbean and Central America, then shipped to France where they're aged a second time in Ferrand Cognac barrels to achieve a remarkable depth of flavor. Plantation Grande Reserve 5-Year-Old Barbados rum is a staggeringly good bargain at $21.99 for 750mL; it's zesty and playful with hints of banana, vanilla wafer, and subdued oak. If you're new to sipping rum, it's a perfect place to start. #3 Flor de Caña 12 Centenario. #4 Ron Abuelo 12 Años--Made by the third generation of the Varela Family in Panama,* this rum ($34.99 for 750mL) walks a fine line between dark sugar and wine-like tannins with flavors that remind me of the layer of marzipan on a Christmas cake, blended with toasted coconut and cedar. If you're a Scotch fan, give this one a try: its subtly smoky backbone mirrors a good peaty dram. Dilute with a cube or two of ice to help it taste its best. #5 El Dorado 15-Year-Old Special Reserve--A favorite of tiki bartenders everywhere for its opulence and crazy depth of flavor, El Dorado's 15-Year-Old Special Reserve ($50 for 750mL) is a stunning sipper with an enormous bulky body full of tobacco, dark molasses, and a wonderful underlying funk. Blended from a combination of rums aged up to 25 years, it's aged in used bourbon casks, which lends soft vanilla and oak flavors. It's almost chewy in its texture and offers a huge complexity of flavor: you'll note bold hints of coffee and clove-spiced orange. #6 Santa Teresa 1796--The Santa Teresa 1796 ($40 for 750mL) is the company's flagship sipping rum. The production process is quite complicated, as a blend of white rums, heavy-bodied rums like blackstrap, and pot still vintages from four to 35 years old are blended together and aged in bourbon barrels before the batch is then passed through another lengthy round of aging solera-style (a rotating system used for the likes of sherry) in former Cognac barrels. Dry leather, slightly smoky honey, and coconut flavors set an understated tone with a supple and soft body, but the rum also packs a fair amount of spice, making it a sound option for fans of rye whiskey. It takes some experimentation to find the best level of dilution; too much ice and all the warm honey notes dissipate, too little and it doesn't expand to its full potential. Start with a single ice cube and adjust until you find your ideal ratio. It's a fun journey that ends up showcasing all of the rum's nuances. #7 Appleton Estate 12 Year Old--Vibrant bittersweet orange and molasses drive the flavors in this Jamaican beauty. The straightforward Appleton Estate 12 Year Old ($36.99 for 750 mL) rum works well in cocktails thanks to its whiskey-like woodiness (specifically, it's great in a rum Old Fashioned). If you're a fan of dry Tennessee whiskies, though, try sipping this well-balanced rum on the rocks.


Healthy Amount

Your safest approach to alcohol is to drink only in moderation, to escape the risks of excessive consumption — including suicide, fetal alcohol syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans allows no more than two drinks for men daily and one for women. A drink of distilled hard alcohol is considered 1.5 fluid ounces. (1.5 fluid ounces = 44.36 grams. 3 fluid oz. = 88.72 grams)

Cancer:

Alcohol use is the second leading cause of cancer, right behind tobacco use. While a moderate or low consumption of alcohol can be healthy and lead to a reduced risk of heart disease, excessive drinking is known to cause heart failure, stroke, and sudden death. In 2007, experts working for the World Health Organizations International Agency for Research on Cancer looked at the scientific evidence regarding cancer and alcohol use from 27 different studies. They found sufficient evidence to state that excessive alcohol use is the main cause of mouth, esophagus, liver, colon, mouth, rectum, and female breast cancers.

Alcohol consumption and overeating interfere with D6D action... GLA: THE MISSING LINK Why dietary supplementation with Gamma Linolenic Acid (GLA) is necessary for the average North American... Over the last 30 years, researchers have found that many people have difficulty utilizing Omega-6 found in the form of Linoleic Acid due an impairment in a critical enzyme – Delta-6-Desaturase, or “D6D”. The D6D enzyme is essential for converting Linoleic Acid into hormone-like compounds called eicosanoids, which are essential for cellular function on a minute-to-minute basis.

D6D function is impaired in many people partially due to the excessively high consumption of Linoleic Acid and partially due to other lifestyle factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, stress, vitamin deficiencies, and high levels of saturated fat and trans-fatty acids in the diet. Some disease states, such as diabetes, are also associated with impaired D6D function.

If a person consumes lots of Omega-6 as Linoleic Acid, but the activity of the D6D enzyme is impaired, then the body is not able to use the Omega-6 it’s getting to produce those beneficial eicosanoids.

Loss of delta-6-desaturase activity as a key factor in aging. Aging is characterized by a wide variety of defects... Delta-6-desaturase (D6D) levels have been found to fall rapidly in the testes and more slowly in the liver in aging rats. D6D is an enzyme which converts cis-linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Other factors which inhibit D6D activity are diabetes, alcohol and radiation, all of which may be associated with accelerated aging. In meat eaters or omnivores which can acquire arachidonic acid from food, the main consequences of D6D loss will be deficiencies of GLA.

defective D6D enzyme = use Borage Oil? The D6D enzyme is often referred to as a "lazy" enzyme. That is to say, it can be slow in doing its job, and under some conditions may actually be impaired. People with skin disorders such as eczema, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis show increased levels of linoleic acid with a simultaneous decrease in gamma-linolenic acid. It is here that the importance of borage oil with its rich source of gamma-linolenic acid becomes evident. Used as a dietary supplement or even applied topically, borage oil can circumvent a "lazy" or impaired D6D enzyme by supplying the body directly with GLA and thus allowing the production of normal levels of PG1.

Several recent studies indicate that BORAGE OIL taken orally increases PG1 levels in the skin and suppresses chronic inflammation. Evidence from animal studies indicates that skin disorders associated with fatty acid imbalances can be corrected through dietary inclusion of borage oil. Similar research with humans has confirmed these findings.

How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss Pure alcohol contains about 7 calories per gram, which makes it nearly twice as fattening as carbohydrates or protein (both contain about 4 calories per gram) and only just under the caloric value for fat (9 calories per gram). This means that if you want to lose weight and reduce excess body fat, alcohol is not a good choice.... Gin, rum, and whiskey (1 fl.oz.) has zero grams of carbs.

Does Drinking Hard Alcohol Help With Weight Loss? Hard liquor, or hard alcohol, typically applies to distilled beverages that contain a minimum of 35 percent alcohol, including vodka, brandy, rum, tequila and gin. While some online bloggers speculate that you’ll lose weight by drinking hard alcohol — since a shot of tequila contains fewer calories than a 12-ounce beer — no evidence exists to support the claims. A single ounce of vodka, scotch or other hard liquor like whiskey typically contains between 64 and 80 calories. Consumption of three 1-ounce drinks in an evening may add as many as 320 calories to your daily intake...

Consumption of any alcoholic beverage elevates your chance for a buildup of visceral fat, or belly fat, according to the October 2007 issue of the "European Journal of Nutrition." Visceral fat hides inside your abdominal area and increases your chances of cancer and heart disease. The dangerous buildup is caused by alcohol’s interference with your body’s ability to burn fat, which is key to successful weight loss. Although your liver normally metabolizes fat when alcohol isn’t present, a person who drinks rum, whiskey or even beer triggers a process called fat sparing. The process forces your body to use the calories from alcohol instead of the calories from fat.


12 Reasons Why You're Not Losing Weight

Have you adopted a vegan or plant-based diet in hopes of losing weight, but the pounds refuse to budge? Or worse, maybe you GAINED weight? You're not alone! While you may not be eating the Standard American Diet anymore, a vegan/plant-based diet has its traps too. Here are 12 culprits that will keep you from losing weight: Oil - If you're not oil-free, that's your #1 culprit. Even if you think you're oil-free, make sure you really are. It's shocking how often oil sneaks into foods, like non-dairy milk and mustard! Alcohol - The second biggest culprit, especially if you're drinking wine, beer, or alcohol with mixers. If you're drinking booze, your body can't burn fat or other calories. High-Fat Plant Foods - Tofu, tempeh, avocado, nuts, seeds, coconut milk, coconut, nut butters, chocolate, and olives are high in fat. "The fat you eat is the fat you wear." - Dr. McDougall Liquid calories - Smoothies and shakes don't provide the same satiety as chewed whole foods. They also skip an important step of the digesting process -- chewing. You'll eat less if you chew. You're Counting Calories - Intuitively you know 100 calories of carrot cake isn't the same as 100 calories of carrots. So why do we keep plugging them into the same math formula? Why do we expect our bodies to treat them the same? You wouldn't mop the floor with a muddy rag assuming just because it's a rag it'll get the job done, right? Convenience Foods - Vegan substitutes like faux meats and cheese are not healthy. Your body knows what to do with peas and soy beans, but not weird lab creations from pea proteins, and soy byproducts. Eating Out - Even if you're ordering a vegan meal, most restaurants overload their food with salt, sugar and oil; a killer combo that makes you overeat AND gain weight. Coffee - Sugar and creamer (even vegan creamers) can turn a latte into a hot, drinkable candy bar. Drink it black or with a little almond milk. Salt - Eating salt won't make you gain weight, but it will make you retain more water, which shows up on the scale. Fiber-Broken Foods - Make sure you're buying 100% whole-wheat (or gluten-free) and oil-free breads, pastas, and crackers, and use them to accent your diet. Don't make them a staple or a snack. Dried fruits - Dried fruits are very calorically dense and not satiating. They are also often coated with sugar and oil. How Alcohol Affects Weight Loss Pure alcohol contains about 7 calories per gram, which makes it nearly twice as fattening as carbohydrates or protein (both contain about 4 calories per gram) and only just under the caloric value for fat (9 calories per gram). This means that if you want to lose weight and reduce excess body fat, alcohol is not a good choice.... Gin, rum, and whiskey (1 fl.oz.) has zero grams of carbs.

Does Drinking Hard Alcohol Help With Weight Loss? Hard liquor, or hard alcohol, typically applies to distilled beverages that contain a minimum of 35 percent alcohol, including vodka, brandy, rum, tequila and gin. While some online bloggers speculate that you’ll lose weight by drinking hard alcohol — since a shot of tequila contains fewer calories than a 12-ounce beer — no evidence exists to support the claims. A single ounce of vodka, scotch or other hard liquor like whiskey typically contains between 64 and 80 calories. Consumption of three 1-ounce drinks in an evening may add as many as 320 calories to your daily intake...

Consumption of any alcoholic beverage elevates your chance for a buildup of visceral fat, or belly fat, according to the October 2007 issue of the "European Journal of Nutrition." Visceral fat hides inside your abdominal area and increases your chances of cancer and heart disease. The dangerous buildup is caused by alcohol’s interference with your body’s ability to burn fat, which is key to successful weight loss. Although your liver normally metabolizes fat when alcohol isn’t present, a person who drinks rum, whiskey or even beer triggers a process called fat sparing. The process forces your body to use the calories from alcohol instead of the calories from fat.

Your safest approach to alcohol is to drink only in moderation, to escape the risks of excessive consumption — including suicide, fetal alcohol syndrome, cirrhosis and heart failure. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans allows no more than two drinks for men daily and one for women. A drink of distilled hard alcohol is considered 1.5 fluid ounces.

14. Alcohol

Alcohol use is the second leading cause of cancer, right behind tobacco use. While a moderate or low consumption of alcohol can be healthy and lead to a reduced risk of heart disease, excessive drinking is known to cause heart failure, stroke, and sudden death. In 2007, experts working for the World Health Organizations International Agency for Research on Cancer looked at the scientific evidence regarding cancer and alcohol use from 27 different studies. They found sufficient evidence to state that excessive alcohol use is the main cause of mouth, esophagus, liver, colon, mouth, rectum, and female breast cancers.

Absinthe--Slideshow

Chai--the drink India cannot live without

5 Reasons Booze Is Deadlier than Heroin and Other Drugs That'll Land You in Jail

Slideshow: Diabetes-Friendly Drinks and Cocktails

SMART Recovery Self-Management And Recovery Training... addiction recovery support group. Our participants learn tools for addiction recovery based on the latest scientific research and participate in a world-wide community which includes free, self-empowering, science-based mutual help groups.

The Stanton Peele Addiction Website excellent articles

Dangerfood: Tonic Water "Tonic water" is a serious misnomer. While this bubbly drink starts as standard water with some carbon dioxide, fruit extracts, sugar, and quinine may all be added to boost flavor. Once those extras are all mixed in, just 4 ounces of this favorite cocktail mixer boasts an impressive 11 grams of sugar

This dangerfood is an easy one to swap out for a healthier alternative, though. For a cool and refreshing drink, choose seltzer and add a squeeze of lemon for flavor. Seltzer is usually straight water with bubbles — no additives. In a cocktail, again switch to seltzer and lemon (or other fruit) and add a splash of bitters to mimic the flavor of the quinine in tonic water.

Stop Drinking Now All Natural & Non-addictive Non-pharmaceutical Declinol helps minimize cravings and allows you to easily cut back or quit at your own pace.

Declinol products are natural and safe herbal, nutritional-supplement based formulas that come in several versions and strengths to fit your unique needs and goals. Whether you wish to simply cut down to one or two drinks or completely quit, all versions support reduced cravings and assist with minimizing withdrawal symptoms – allowing you to arrive at your desired alcohol consumption on your own schedule.

For light drinkers who are trying to cut back a drink or two, or for occasional alcohol cravings, choose Declinol Regular Strength sprays. For medium-use drinkers or occasional binge drinkers, choose Extra Strength. If you have a longer-term alcohol issue or are a regular binge drinker and want to get back to the healthy zone or completely quit, doctors use and recommend one of the Clinical Strength kits.

While everyone is different, most people require 60 - 90 days to change their physiology and learned behaviors to achieve a new routine of reduced or no alcohol. Regardless of your starting point, after achieving your goal, the Declinol product provides customized long-term vitamin supplement and cravings support to help keep you at optimum health and minimize risk of relapse.

Eight Ways to Naturally Lower Blood Pressure Blood Pressure and Vegetarian Diets, a global meta-analysis published Feb. 24, 2014, in JAMA Internal Medicine, finds a nutrient-packed vegetarian diet can lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease.

Alcohol can cause a sudden rise in blood pressure. Women should consume less than one alcoholic beverage per day (daily alcohol use increases breast cancer risk),16 and men should limit themselves to no more than two drinks.17An alcoholic beverage is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled liquor.

Blood Pressure Fact: The National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute finds modifying alcohol consumption can lower systolic blood pressure by an average of 2 to 4 mm Hg.


aviva, or eviva, is prost in Greek

Greek drinks:

8 Drinks, Besides Coffee, That’ll Wake You Up But, in the midst of growing up and taking responsibility for our actions, the negative effects of coffee quickly become apparent. In excess, the caffeine can really twist up our cardiovascular system, causing increased irregular heartbeats, anxiety and various other unwanted ailments. As consumers, it takes a very careful eye and easy-flowing source of money to buy coffee responsibly, both from an environmental and human rights standpoint.

But, we love it, and that’s that. And, it’s not all bad. Coffee actually does have significant health benefits, too. Even so, in an ideal world, our general attitude and ability to wake up shouldn’t rely entirely on one beverage. So, what if there weren’t coffee at the ready? How, then, could we wake up?

Hot Chocolate, Chai, Dandelion Root Tea, Kombucha, Mint Tea, Yerba Mate, Black Tea, Green Tea With Citrus, Green tea is just something we should all be drinking. It can help with our teeth, lungs, organs, and immune system. It prevents several types of cancer and cognitive diseases. It also has a little caffeine. With a squeeze of citrus, or vitamin C, some of its antioxidants are seriously strengthened, and the smell of citrus fruit inspires uplifting moods.


Pain Trigger: Beverages

When it comes to beverages, alcohol is the king of pain. Red wine, whiskey, beer, and champagne are the drinks blamed most often for a throbbing head. Solution: Limit your intake of alcohol. [http://www.webmd.com/pain-management/ss/slideshow-reasons-for-pain].


Wines

Favorite Wines:

Chianti
Barolo
Riesling

Texas Wines:

Haak Vineyards & Winery 2014 Semi-sweet Blanc du Bois, white like riesling, $19
Llano Estacado Signature Meritage Red Wine, classic Bordeaux, $10
http://www.texasmonthly.com/food/top-texas-wines-spring-2016-edition/
http://www.dallasnews.com/life/cooking/2014/09/23/10-outstanding-texas-wines-that-are-a-good-value
https://www.texaswinetrail.com/ Tx Hill Country Wines
https://txwinelover.com/

The Texas Hill Country wine region starts out just north of San Antonio and stretches halfway to Fort Worth, some 15,000 square miles. http://www.winespectator.com/wct/region/rid/110

http://www.gotexan.org/ExperienceGOTEXAN/TexasWine/WineBasics.aspx

Barolo Wine Barolo is a red Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita (DOCG) wine produced in the northern Italian region of Piedmont. It is made from the Nebbiolo grape and is often described as one of Italy's greatest wines.

Barolo is often described as having the aromas of tar and roses, and the wines are noted for their ability to age and usually take on a rust red tinge as they mature. Barolo needs to be aged for at least 38 months after the harvest before release, of which at least 18 months must be in wood.[2] When subjected to aging of at least five years before release, the wine can be labeled a Riserva.


Send comments to co@dadbyrn.com, Colby Glass, MLIS, Professor Emeritus