Movie Favorites, Modern

Arrival, 2016
Articoles
Badass
Big Trouble
Big Trouble in Little China
The Birds
Blue Thunder
Bourdain, Anthony
Burt Trynalds
Cabaret
Chicago
Coen Brothers
Day of the Triffids
Dean Martin
Dirty Harry
Drive Angry
Fast Times at Ridgemont High
Glass Bottom Boat, The
Heartbreakers
High Anxiety
Hoffman, Philip Seymour
Hopscotch
Inherit the Wind
Intolerable Cruelty
Keanu Reeves
Killer Tomatoes
Kuffs
Lee Remick
Links
Love Potion No. 9
Lucille Ball
Marlow, 1969
Mating Game, The
The Meg
Midnight Run
The Mummy
Never a Dull Moment
Norma Rae
Overboard
The Prize
Prizzi's Honor
Quotes
Rio Bravo
Rocky Horror Show
Stars
Swamp Thing
Sylvester Stallone
The Three Musketeers 1993
Thunderheart
Tremors
You Can't Take It With You
Young Frankenstein

TCM Movie Database, Title Search


Vulture

The Rocky Horror Show


The Rocky Horror Show

Clip - The Rocky Horror Picture Show "Sweet Transvestite" - video

Clip - Rocky Horror Time Warp - video

Review - Patricia Quinn Reflects On 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show' | Studio 10 - video

Meatloaf scene - Rocky Horror Picture Show-Hot Patootie-Bless my soul - video

Clip - The Rocky Horror Picture Show - Planet Schmanet Janet - video

Clip - the rocky horror picture show eddie's teddy - video

Clip - Rose Tints My World- The Rocky Horror Picture Show - video









Blue Thunder

Directed by John Badham
Produced by Gordon Carroll, Phil Feldman, Andrew Fogelson
Written by Dan O'Bannon, Don Jakoby
Starring

Roy Scheider
Warren Oates
Candy Clark
Daniel Stern
Malcolm McDowell


Music by Arthur B. Rubinstein
Cinematography John A. Alonzo
Edited by Edward M. Abroms, Frank Morriss
Production company Rastar
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date May 13, 1983
Running time 109 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $11 million
Box office $42,313,354[1]

V Blue Thunder 1983 Full HD Trailer English 1080p ReMastered By JDG









Heartbreakers


Heartbreakers (2001 film)

Heartbreakers is a 2001 caper-romantic comedy film directed by David Mirkin. It stars Sigourney Weaver, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ray Liotta, Jason Lee, and Gene Hackman. Weaver was nominated for a Golden Satellite Award for her performance in the film. The plot revolves around an elaborate con set up by a mother-daughter team to swindle wealthy men out of their money, and what happens during their "last" con together.

This film is written by Robert Dunn, Paul Guay and Stephen Mazur. It was the third collaboration by Guay and Mazur, whose previous comedies were The Little Rascals and Liar Liar.

Heartbreakers Cast

Heartbreakers Official Trailer #1 - Gene Hackman Movie (2001) HD

Heartbreakers Cast

HEARTBREAKERS (2001) - Official Movie Trailer

Heartbreakers Cast

Jennifer Love Hewitt Is A Massage "Happy Ending" Expert - CONAN on TBS


Heartbreakers Movie Trailer - DVD Trailer 2001


V Sigourney's Back In The USSR













The Day of the Triffids











Swamp Thing



















Sylvester Stallone

Sylvester Stallone Charged With Importing Human Growth Hormone Into Australia










Burt Reynalds

46 Years of Burt Reynalds' Glorious Mustache Pictures

Burt Reynolds, Hollywood action star with playful charisma, dies at 82 WP By Adam Bernstein September 6, 18

Burt Reynolds, whose blend of Southern-fried machismo and wiseguy playfulness launched his worldwide celebrity in the 1970s, first as a freewheeling chat-show guest, then as a nude centerfold in Cosmopolitan magazine and finally as a Hollywood action star, died Sept. 6. He was 82.

His death was confirmed in a family statement provided by his manager, Erik Kritzer. Additional details were not immediately available.

Tire-screeching fare such as "Smokey and the Bandit" (1977) and "The Cannonball Run" (1981) largely bookended Mr. Reynolds's reign as a top box-office draw and cemented his on-screen persona as a carefree man's man with an arm around a lady and his foot on the gas pedal.

Off-screen, the mustachioed actor developed a reputation as a hard-drinking playboy whose charm alternated with a volcanic, hair-trigger temper. He made atrocious career decisions, propelled in part by a drug addiction and dramatic financial reversals. A low point was his excruciatingly public breakup and divorce from actress Loni Anderson in the early 1990s.









Quotes

"Every generation gets the movie monster it deserves...

"...Spielberg. His War Of the Worlds... this hawkish moment demands spectacles of righteous revenge, and he has complied bymaking a very Republican horror film.

"We are innocent, they are evil--that's the moral of this movie" (Richard Goldstein. "The Naked & the Undead." The Nation, Sep. 5, 2005: 8-10).









Lee Remick

What Happened to Lee Remick? also Andy Griffith









What Happened to Dean Martin?









PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN

~

Video: PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN - 'CAPOTE' - R.I.P.









The Birds, Alfred Hitchcock


The Birds, Alfred Hitchcock









Drive Angry 2011

Drive Angry IMDb

from IMDb

Directed by Patrick Lussier

from IMDb

Drive Angry - Alive by Meat Loaf - video

Drive Angry 3D Soundtrack: Raise a Little Hell - video

Drive Angry "Alive" (Meat Loaf and Mark Campbell mashed) - video

Clip from Drive Angry - video

Clip - Road Block Scene (Drive Angry) No god damn way are you an FBI Agent - video

Clip from Drive Angry - The Accountant - video

Clip From Drive Angry The Accountant's scar/ + /Deleted Scene/ - video

Top 20 Drive Angry Lols - video

Clips from Drive angry:Amber Heard - video

Clip - 1969 CHARGER DRIVE ANGRY EMI RAM CUT - video

Nicolas Cage lines from DRIVE ANGRY - video

Clips - Best of: The Accountant - from Drive Angry - video

Drive Angry - The Accountant

Drive Angry 2011 Nicolas Cage, Amber Heard

Drive Angry - Alive by Meat Loaf

Drive Angry( 2001)Full Movie

Drive Angry - Hydrogen Truck (whole scene)

Drive Angry: Answer. The. Question.










Stars

Stars Who Ruined Their Careers In A Matter Of Seconds

'Roma' made Yalitza Aparicio a star. Now she's giving a voice to her indigenous fans.

Long before Yalitza Aparicio became the first indigenous woman nominated for best actress at the Oscars, she applied for a retail position at a clothing store in her hometown of Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca.

She didn't get the job. Aparicio, now in the same conversations as Glenn Close and Lady Gaga, recalls the store manager's exact words: "It's your skin color.”

She wasn't surprised. It isn't unusual for people with indigenous features to face discrimination in Mexico. But now Aparicio, who had never acted before landing the lead role in the critically lauded "Roma,” has gone from aspiring public school teacher in a city of less than 18,000 to the first indigenous woman on Vogue Mexico's cover. Fans tout her as the face of indigenous Mexico. Trolls leave racist comments on her social media. And at just 25 years old, she's wrestling with the rewards and burdens of fame.

Soft-spoken and quick to smile, she says she doesn't consider herself an indigenous activist, though she hopes to better express herself publicly about these issues in the future. Yet when the camera turns on, she gazes straight ahead, exuding the confidence that made her on-screen character, Cleo, so effortlessly realistic. "I never liked being in front of a camera. I was a scaredy-cat, very reserved and not very social,” Aparicio said in Spanish, of her life before "Roma.” "I never thought I would leave my hometown, but here I am.”

Since its release by Netflix in December, "Roma" has racked up accolades around the world, including 10 Academy Award nominations. It has also inspired innumerable features focused on Aparicio's character, Cleo, a domestic worker from Oaxaca inspired by writer-director Alfonso Cuarón's real-life childhood nanny. Cleo, who speaks a combination of Spanish and Mixtec on screen, represents the more than 2.4 million domestic workers across present-day Mexico, more than 95 percent of whom are female and from indigenous areas. The black-and-white film, set in the early 1970s, depicts the dynamic between Cleo and her employerswith startling intimacy, presenting her inside and outside of the home where she lives and works.

Luis Rosales, the casting director for "Roma,” said Cuarón gave him only two directives as Rosales searched for their star. The first: Whoever got the role needed to physically look like the person on whom Cleo is based. Second, he said in an email, "she had to feel like her, too.”

"We interviewed over 3,000 women for the role of Cleo,” Rosales said. "Yalitza got our attention since her very first audition.”

Aparicio, who auditioned at the urging of her older sister, was familiar with the role. Her mother is a domestic worker, so she easily identified with Cleo. "For some scenes, I interpreted the memories I have of my mom,” she said.

Aparicio had never heard of Cuarón or seen any of his films before "Roma" -- let alone watched many movies growing up. The only film memories she has are kung-fu scenes from the Bruce Lee movies her father loved. The only TV she remembers seeing as a kid was "Inuyasha,” a Japanese anime about a schoolgirl who's transported to the social and political upheaval of the Sengoku era.

"I never watched much TV as a kid because no one else looked like me on the screen,” she said.

Trailer for Roma

Instead, like other kids in Oaxaca, one of the poorest states in Mexico, she took on the responsibility of financially contributing to her family from an early age. While she was in elementary school, she sold toys and clothes in the streets with her family. Growing up, she empowered herself by talking openly about the color of her skin, taking it as a point of pride when people on the street said, “¡Hola morenita!” -- a common greeting that's meant to be endearing, although it translates to the brash-sounding, "Hi, dark-skinned one.”

"In my family, I've always had the darkest skin,” she said. "I always joked with my siblings that it was because I was made of chocolate.”

That perseverance comes through on Aparicio's magazine covers, fan selfies and black-and-white billboards plastered on the streets of West Hollywood. On her Instagram account, where she has 1 million followers, she posts powerful handwritten letters from her fans, many of whom also have indigenous backgrounds. A few weeks before the Oscars, she posted a note written on a torn-out piece of composition paper: "Dear, Yalitza. Thank you for giving us a voice in a world where they want to silence us and make us disappear. Wishing you all the luck.”

Her success has brought increased attention to the 68 indigenous nations in Mexico, where up to 14 percent of the population is indigenous. "If Yalitza wins the Oscar, it will be a reminder to the entire world that indigenous people are alive and very much still existing in the world in the 21st century,” says Odilia Romero, the national coordinator for Frente Indígena de Organizaciones Binacionales, an association that oversees indigenous affairs in the United States and Mexico.

As Laverne DeFazio, Penny Marshall helped push a Lucy-like hilarity down comedy's conveyor belt

Penny Marshall, left, and Cindy Williams in "Laverne & Shirley.”
(ABC Photo Archives/ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images)

Penny Marshall, sitcom star and hitmaking director of 'A League of Their Own,’ dies at 75

Penny Marshall Died of the Modern Plague

We all remember Penny Marshall as the energetic star of the iconic '70s TV sitcom, Laverne & Shirley. As the nasal, good-natured Laverne, she was young and full of life.

But when she died on December 18 at the age of 75, her body had been destroyed by a deadly epidemic that is sweeping America and other countries. She died of complications from type 2 diabetes.

Doing it her way: Penny Marshall broke barriers for women -- but rejected the 'feminism' label

They always said Cher (and cockroaches) could survive the end of the world. Lately, she's not so sure about that.

At 72, Cher went temporarily blond for last summer's "Mamma Mia" movie
sequel, followed by a new album of Abba cover songs. Her "Classic
Cher" tour continues in 2019, and a new Broadway musical about her
life and loves opens Dec. 3. She will be one of this weekend's
recipients of the 41st annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington. (Machado Cicala)

LAS VEGAS -- What sentient being doesn't know the six-decade story of her career? What's left to tell? From "I Got You, Babe" and the Bob Mackie gowns so provocatively sewn, to the divorce, then the other divorce, then the Oscar-winning movie career (“Snap out of it!”), she is always rising up from a recent trip down. The nadir of hair-product infomercials vs. the thrill of the dance-floor comeback. It should be a required part of the SAT: Write 150 words about the life of Cher. Use examples.

The curtain drops, the audience screams, the beat kicks in and the diva descends on a tiny platform strung from the rafters of the Park MGM theater on a recent Wednesday night. She's dressed in a golden glamazon bustier, with a massive wig of bright orange ringlets cascading from her shiny crown. She belts out lyrics about the glory of living in a woman's world.

Cher at 20, photographed in Paris, December 1966. (AP)

She is 1960s Cher, the original recipe, barely 20 years old in Cleopatra eyeliner, tossing her long, shiny, raven hair, wearing bell-bottoms and love beads.

Something very odd begins to happen here, loosening one's general understanding of the time-space continuum. There is no 21st century. There is only this sort of present-tense past that we all live in, full of remakes and revivals and constant nostalgia. Cher will guide you.

She starts singing "The Beat Goes On,” followed by "I Got You, Babe,” accompanied by that sort of Dylan-derivative twang of her late ex-husband, Salvatore Phillip "Sonny" Bono, whose image is beamed 20 feet tall. It's the black-and-white footage of a much younger Sonny singing and grinning; the man she still loves.

Sonny and Cher's split in 1974 all but stopped America in its tracks, leading to the swift cancellation of their top-rated CBS variety show and leaving children everywhere to wonder if their own parents might also divorce. (Answer: Yes, probably.)

She says she never would have left him, except that her friend David Geffen had read the contracts that she had signed but hadn't taken time to scrutinize. She learned that Sonny owned 95 percent of her and everything she did. "Make me a partner and not an employee, and I'll stay,” she begged him. He wouldn't. Today she's a fierce advocate for a woman's right to equal pay.

The Sonny and Cher story looks different in all this hindsight. The power imbalance is as galling as the chrysalis-butterfly narrative that follows it is inspiring. It's been another 20 years since Sonny died in that skiing accident.

Some nights, Cher says, "I actually look up at his face [during the show] and wonder, 'What are you thinking? I bet you're really happy up there.’?”

Entertainers Sonny and Cher sing during the taping of
“The Danny Thomas Special" in Los Angeles, Jan. 21, 1966. (AP)

When she's in Vegas on these brief engagements, she stays in a secured, private villa that is apart from but within a casino complex, a hidden lap of luxury exclusive to the highest rollers -- the Chinese business executives, the Russian oligarchs -- and our dear, sweet Cher. She's wearing a comfy black hoodie and matching pants tucked into furry black Malibu boots, curling herself into a sofa next to the fireplace, sipping from a huge tumbler of soda and ice, the dark tendrils of her hair spilled just so across her shoulders.

It's very involved being Cher, just like you've always imagined it would be. "I just want to be famous and not have to do anything more,” she says.

So then stop, everyone says. You've earned it. You're there. Even Barbra Streisand thinks Cher works too hard. Cher doesn't buy it, reminding you that she was dropped twice from her old record labels. She'll gladly take the constant motion, the incessant demands, the touring hither and yon and the 3.5 million Twitter followers all needing to know how their queen feels right this moment.

She's not just another Hollywood liberal trolling the right. Cher has done her homework, reading deeply on the history of fascism and nationalism. She takes in several newspapers and breaking-news alerts a day, tweeting out links with fresh outrage. She's been known to call in to MSNBC and fret about an irreparable erosion of American values. There's a line everyone knows, traceable to no one (Cher can't remember when she first heard it, but it begins showing up in news archives in the mid-1990s), that after a nuclear war, the only living things left will be …

The Diane Lane Thing is deep and it's real. Especially with women.

Diane Lane, 53, on her career at the moment: "Now it's getting fun. Now I can say,
‘How far can I take this?’ " (Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)

NEW YORK -- A recent uncontrolled experiment revealed that if you mention the name Diane Lane in a roomful of women, two things will happen. An adoring gasp will go up. And then the "I loved's" begin: Gasp: "I loved her in 'A Little Romance.’ " Gasp: "The bus scene with Viggo Mortensen in 'A Walk on the Moon.’ " Gasp: "That train scene in 'Unfaithful.’ " "Lonesome Dove.” "Secretariat.” "Under the Tuscan Sun.” Gasp. Gasp. Gasp.

Lane's friend Jane Fonda attributes the Diane Lane Thing to one thing: "Vulnerability. You want to protect her. You know she's kind, there's not a mean bone in her body, and you sense that. She's cautious, and so you want to wrap your arms around her and encourage her, and at the same time, she's a real survivor.”

Along with the rest of us, Fonda also found herself gasping at the train scene in "Unfaithful" -- for which Lane received an Oscar nomination -- when the actress's character, a straying wife, was allowing shame, disbelief and remembered desire to wash over her, sometimes all at once. "And [then] she bursts out laughing, and it's like, 'What?’ " Fonda recalls. "It was the most surprising reaction; it was so effective and unexpected and multifaceted. And that's Diane.”

The Diane Lane Thing is deep, and it's real. Men love her, sure. But women looove her, on a reflexive, almost pheromonal level that defies ready explanation. She's that rare Hollywood creature who, at 53, seems both glamorous and radically authentic, still capable of furrowing her brow, betraying a crinkled frown, allowing a panoply of competing emotions to play across her face. Blessed with spectacular beauty, she's somehow still relatable. We get Diane Lane, and, more important, we feel as though she would get us should we ever be friends. Which, really, we could be if .?.?. we could be.

Lane experiences the Diane Lane Thing firsthand, all the time. "They come up to me,” she says of her swooning female fans. "It's very sweet. They say, 'I love you.’ I don't know [why]. I can't take any credit for it.”

Isn't that exactly what Diane Lane would say, in our BFF dreams? Over a freewheeling two-hour lunch recently, Lane was mostly everything her admirers would expect: thoughtful, candid, confiding, self-deprecating and instinctively caretaking, at one point passing a basket of bread, taking a piece and saying, "Remember the ladies who waved away the dessert tray on the Titanic.” She evinces an almost subversive altruism when it comes to her female peers in Hollywood, refusing to play along with popular myths of zero-sum success and Bette-and-Joan catfights.

Lane's instinctive feminism is now coming into play in the form of two new gigs: She stars in not one, but two streaming series, Netflix's "House of Cards" and the Matthew Weiner anthology series "The Romanoffs" on Amazon. (Amazon founder and chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.)

Lane still evinces mild surprise to be part of "House of Cards,” much less its sixth and final season. In recent years, she has found even a fleeting image of the White House "triggering.” She admits to admiring the show for its writing and acting but shying away from its nihilistic worldview. "There is a deliciousness to leaning into cynicism for humor,” Lane observes, "and then it kicks into a kind of terror.” When she was cast a little more than a year ago -- as Annette Shepherd, who with her brother Bill, played by Greg Kinnear, evokes comparisons to sundry Kochs, Mercers and DeVoses -- Lane took it as a dare. "And I love that feeling,” she notes. "There's just a thrill about it.”

The pursuit of new thrills -- and new platforms -- looks like yet another canny move in a four-decade career that has proven to be exceptionally enduring, supple and, in its most recent incarnation, steadily percolating. There was a time when Lane would have been forced to accept an inevitable winding-down at this stage of life. "Now it's like a contest,” she says with her signature catlike smile. "Now it's getting fun. Now I can say, 'How far can I take this?’ ”

There was a moment last year when the answer might have been, "Not as far as you think.” One of Lane's first scenes on "House of Cards" was with Kevin Spacey, whose Frank Underwood was the scheming Shakespearean center of the show's pathologically transactional world. The day is etched in memory, she says, not because of any disquieting signals, but because, in joining what had become a strongly bonded family over five years, she was under "extra pressure to deliver the goods and fit in with the vibe.”

From there, she traveled to New York to be an Easter egg in an episode of "The Romanoffs”; during a break she learned that Spacey had been terminated from "House of Cards" because of allegations of sexual misconduct. The show hadn't even officially announced her involvement yet.

After a three-month hiatus to retool, the show's final season wound up being much more female-centric, with Robin Wright's Claire Underwood -- now the U.S. president -- navigating a poisonous and sexist political culture, while playing mind games with Annette, with whom she has a fraught history. "All I know is I fell uphill,” Lane says now, "because I got more screen time with Robin Wright. She is formidable; Claire is formidable. And it's delicious for the audience, I think, to see two women like cobra snakes, doing their mesmerizing dance together.”

There is no doubt that viewers will watch Claire and Annette's lean-in-with-a-stiletto brand of feminism in "House of Cards" through the lens of #MeToo, Time's Up, the Kavanaugh hearings and the Trump resistance. Of-the-moment themes of accusation and belief also animate "The Romanoffs,” in which Lane's character, Katherine Ford, is a professor of Russian literature whose choices as a wife, mother and female professional are challenged when a family acquaintance is blamed for a troubling boundary violation.

With the testimony of another Dr. Ford still very much top of mind, Lane has been keenly aware of how her work is overlapping with the zeitgeist in ways that feel both strange and acridly familiar. "I remember watching 'The Stepford Wives' when it was on TV, back when we had three channels, and it chilled me,” she says, "as did the Anita Hill hearings just a few years later. And then there are just so many benchmark moments. .?.?. Did you ever put a battery on your tongue? You never forget that sensation. And I feel sort of like, is that the norm now?”

She compares the kismet of her career to being a toy in an arcade claw machine. "I don't mind it,” she says with a laugh. "I'm very grateful and lucky that I can live up to being picked.” If she inherited her mother's beguiling looks, she also absorbed her father's view of acting, which he considered a near-sacred calling. Her first professional gig was at La MaMa Theater at age 6, in an experimental production of "Medea.” When she acted opposite Laurence Olivier in "A Little Romance" -- at the ripe age of 13 -- he pronounced her the next Grace Kelly.

They always said Cher (and cockroaches) could survive the end of the world. Lately, she's not so sure about that.

At 72, Cher went temporarily blond for last summer's "Mamma Mia" movie
sequel, followed by a new album of Abba cover songs. Her "Classic
Cher" tour continues in 2019, and a new Broadway musical about her
life and loves opens Dec. 3. She will be one of this weekend's
recipients of the 41st annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington. (Machado Cicala)

LAS VEGAS -- What sentient being doesn't know the six-decade story of her career? What's left to tell? From "I Got You, Babe" and the Bob Mackie gowns so provocatively sewn, to the divorce, then the other divorce, then the Oscar-winning movie career (“Snap out of it!”), she is always rising up from a recent trip down. The nadir of hair-product infomercials vs. the thrill of the dance-floor comeback. It should be a required part of the SAT: Write 150 words about the life of Cher. Use examples.

The curtain drops, the audience screams, the beat kicks in and the diva descends on a tiny platform strung from the rafters of the Park MGM theater on a recent Wednesday night. She's dressed in a golden glamazon bustier, with a massive wig of bright orange ringlets cascading from her shiny crown. She belts out lyrics about the glory of living in a woman's world.

Cher at 20, photographed in Paris, December 1966. (AP)

She is 1960s Cher, the original recipe, barely 20 years old in Cleopatra eyeliner, tossing her long, shiny, raven hair, wearing bell-bottoms and love beads.

Something very odd begins to happen here, loosening one's general understanding of the time-space continuum. There is no 21st century. There is only this sort of present-tense past that we all live in, full of remakes and revivals and constant nostalgia. Cher will guide you.

She starts singing "The Beat Goes On,” followed by "I Got You, Babe,” accompanied by that sort of Dylan-derivative twang of her late ex-husband, Salvatore Phillip "Sonny" Bono, whose image is beamed 20 feet tall. It's the black-and-white footage of a much younger Sonny singing and grinning; the man she still loves.

Sonny and Cher's split in 1974 all but stopped America in its tracks, leading to the swift cancellation of their top-rated CBS variety show and leaving children everywhere to wonder if their own parents might also divorce. (Answer: Yes, probably.)

She says she never would have left him, except that her friend David Geffen had read the contracts that she had signed but hadn't taken time to scrutinize. She learned that Sonny owned 95 percent of her and everything she did. "Make me a partner and not an employee, and I'll stay,” she begged him. He wouldn't. Today she's a fierce advocate for a woman's right to equal pay.

The Sonny and Cher story looks different in all this hindsight. The power imbalance is as galling as the chrysalis-butterfly narrative that follows it is inspiring. It's been another 20 years since Sonny died in that skiing accident.

Some nights, Cher says, "I actually look up at his face [during the show] and wonder, 'What are you thinking? I bet you're really happy up there.’?”

Entertainers Sonny and Cher sing during the taping of
“The Danny Thomas Special" in Los Angeles, Jan. 21, 1966. (AP)

When she's in Vegas on these brief engagements, she stays in a secured, private villa that is apart from but within a casino complex, a hidden lap of luxury exclusive to the highest rollers -- the Chinese business executives, the Russian oligarchs -- and our dear, sweet Cher. She's wearing a comfy black hoodie and matching pants tucked into furry black Malibu boots, curling herself into a sofa next to the fireplace, sipping from a huge tumbler of soda and ice, the dark tendrils of her hair spilled just so across her shoulders.

It's very involved being Cher, just like you've always imagined it would be. "I just want to be famous and not have to do anything more,” she says.

So then stop, everyone says. You've earned it. You're there. Even Barbra Streisand thinks Cher works too hard. Cher doesn't buy it, reminding you that she was dropped twice from her old record labels. She'll gladly take the constant motion, the incessant demands, the touring hither and yon and the 3.5 million Twitter followers all needing to know how their queen feels right this moment.

She's not just another Hollywood liberal trolling the right. Cher has done her homework, reading deeply on the history of fascism and nationalism. She takes in several newspapers and breaking-news alerts a day, tweeting out links with fresh outrage. She's been known to call in to MSNBC and fret about an irreparable erosion of American values. There's a line everyone knows, traceable to no one (Cher can't remember when she first heard it, but it begins showing up in news archives in the mid-1990s), that after a nuclear war, the only living things left will be …










The Mummy

Facts About 'The Mummy' Films You Need To Know


Evelyn "Evie" Carnahan. Evie was played by the brilliant English actress Rachel Weisz, but you knew that already. Although did you know that her name has a special inspiration? The character was a tribute to Lady Evelyn Carnarvon, she was the daughter of amateur Egyptologist Lord Carnarvon. Both of whom were present at the opening of the tomb of Tutankhamen in 1922!

Arnold Vosloo, the South African stage actor, was brought on board to play The Mummy. He clearly understood the approach Sommers wanted, however he only agreed to take the role of Imhotep "if I could do it absolutely straight. From Imhotep's point of view, this is a skewed version of 'Romeo and Juliet’.” Guess it worked out in the end!




Venezuelan actress and model Patricia Velásquez is actually known as the world's first openly lesbian Latina supermodel. In February 2015, she released her memoir Straight Walk, where she reveals her struggles growing up in poverty and how her relationship with Sandra Bernhard caused her to discover she was a lesbian. Some even claim that she is the first Native American model.

C:\Users\Colby Glass\Documents\$$cybyrcom\webindex\TheMummy-Patricia-Velásquez.jpg



The Mummy 2017
In 2012, Universal announced their plan to reboot the franchise. Fans were eager to see what would happen and if any of the original cast members would make a reappearance. The Mummy (2017 film) was meant to serve as the first installment of the Dark Universe. No new plans have been released as to what's next.


Rachel Weisz did reject an offer to star in The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor as she had issues with the script. Actress Maria Bello replaced her. It's safe to say that fans weren't happy with the outcome – for one, they all love Weisz's character and seeing someone else take her place didn't set well with everyone.


Back to Patricia Velasquez for a minute. Her "costume" consisted of some jewelry and a loin cloth…everything else was just body paint. And the body paint took ~four~ hours to apply.


Do you remember the scene when Beni has a sackful of gold he is trying to load onto a camel? And when he pulls the reins, the camel doesn't even budge? Yeah, that's because none of the camels liked Kevin J. O'Connor.


Turns out that the morning after The Mummy was released in theatres, Stephen Sommers got a rather pleasant call. The director reveals that Universal phoned him and said, "We need another one.”


Originally the Medjai were meant to be tattooed head to toe. However Stephen Sommers vetoed the idea as the actor Oded Fehr was just "too good-looking" to be covered up.


After The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor was released in 2008, a sequel was in the works. The Mummy: Rise of the Aztec would see Fraser, Bello, Hannah, and Ford all reprising their roles and Antonio Banderas was going to play the villain. However, the film was ultimately cancelled and Universal Pictures instead chose to release a reboot in 2017. This would be the first installment in the Dark Universe franchise.


The Mummy did so well in the box office that many sequels and spinoffs were created. We had a sequel, The Mummy Returns and even a second sequel, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor. There was an animated series and also a spin-off prequel, The Scorpion King, which starred Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson.


Name Origin
Around 2600 BC, there was an architect named Imhotep. He helped construct the first pyramids like the Pyramid of Djoser. Some claimed he came from the gods since his talent was so incredible. "Imhotep" translates to "one who comes in peace.” So in real life he was a celebrated architect and also physician and not at all the villain we see in the movie.


Of course, dehydration is a major concern when filming in the Sahara. Thus, the medical team on set concocted a special drink for the crew and cast to drink every two hours. In addition, the crew needed to deal with sandstorms, spiders, scorpions and snakes. Plenty of crew members were even airlifted from the location after being bitten.


Remember Ardeth Bay? That name is an anagram for Death By Ra. Yes, he was the sworn protector of mankind from the villain, Imhotep. Yet, in The Mummy (1932), Ardath Bey, notice the different spelling, is actually Imhotep's alter-ego. He uses this identity to pass as a modern Egyptian.

Hey, not everything was exactly television appropriate in the film. That's why they made some slight adjustments before the film was broadcast on TV. One change they made was to paint on a small bikini on Anck-su-namun's body.


The Mummy actually took the win for Best Make-Up during the Saturn Awards that year. Does this one really surprise you? From the many amazing things about this movie, one that always sticks with people has to be the makeup.











Coen Brothers

Coen Bros. Movies:

Hail, Caesar!
Blood Simple
Fargo
The Big lebowski
O Brother, Where Art Thou?
No Country for Old Men
Raising Arizona

A Guide to the Films of the Coen Brothers

"The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.” - The Coen brothers made a western for Netflix. It's brilliant, and unlike anything else they've done.

In the Coen brothers' brilliant new film "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” an existential western told in six unrelated chapters, the cowboy cliches pile up quickly, like the film's body count.

In fact, its first chapter, the shortest of the film's half-dozen vignettes, and the one that lends "Ballad" its title, is a kind of cowboy comic book. Starring Tim Blake Nelson as the titular Buster, a traveling singer and gunslinger who dispatches those who cross him in spectacularly exaggerated style, this short take on the genre is both funny and morbid as heck, signaling the Coens' intention to chew on the theme of human mortality like a cowpoke nurses his chawin' tobacky.

Tim Blake Nelson ~


That single-minded focus continues in the next installment, in which James Franco plays a bank robber who has been sentenced to death by hanging. Depending on how you look at things, he's either the luckiest or unluckiest man in the world, as his execution goes (darkly) comically awry.

Called "Meal Ticket,” the film's third episode stars Liam Neeson and Harry Melling as itinerant entertainers touring the western settlements. Their act consists of Melling's character -- a quadruple amputee known as Harrison the Wingless Thrush, who cannot feed, bathe or relieve himself without the assistance of Neeson's Impresario -- reciting verse and oratory, including snippets of Shakespeare, Shelley and the Gettysburg Address. It is here, in this O. Henryesque tale, that the Coens find their true voice or, rather, the true voice of this anthology, which is ultimately much more dark, and satisfying, than comedy.

If that's your definition of entertainment -- and blissfully it is mine -- "Ballad" paints a deliciously dismal portrait of the human condition.

... Other less familiar faces who shine include Grainger Hines -- a spiritual cousin to Sam Elliott -- opposite Kazan, and Jonjo O'Neill as Gleeson's bounty-hunting partner.

Jonjo O'Neill, left, as "The Englishman" and Brendan Gleeson
as "The Irishman" in "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs.” (Netflix)

It is O'Neill who pretty much steals the show, or at least wraps it up nicely with a ghoulish little bow, in the film's final chapter, "The Mortal Remains.” The longest and best of the film's segments, "Remains" situates O'Neill's dapper Englishman in a stagecoach filled with four other strangers, all under a roof that is also carrying the corpse of an outlaw. As the coach hurtles through the advancing darkness, he regales his fellow travelers with a creepy tale, one that functions as a sort of ghost story (or one that lands with something approaching the force of a shivery campfire yarn).

"The Mortal Remains" brings all these tales together beautifully, by which I mean in a coda that is somber and hauntingly unsettled, like the last note of a dirge. Its music lingers in the air long after the closing credits.


High Anxiety


Lady Lucille Ball in Forever Darling










Overboard (1987)

A cruel but beautiful heiress mocks and cheats over a hired carpenter. When she gets amnesia after an accident, he decides to introduce her to regular life by convincing her they're husband and wife.

Stars: Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell, Edward Herrmann










Intolerable Cruelty (2003)

A beautiful gold digger matches wits with a shrewd Beverly Hills divorce lawyer who is increasingly attracted to her.

Stars: George Clooney, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Billy Bob Thornton





Articles

'Cuties' sparked outrage in the U.S. The reception in Senegal was vastly different.

DAKAR, Senegal -- Lawmakers in the United States have condemned "Cuties,” accusing the controversial French film's creators of exploiting children. But viewers in the Senegalese capital saw no such thing at a screening Tuesday, praising the portrait of an immigrant girl caught between two cultures.

More than 100 people flocked to the Hotel du Phare's rooftop to watch Maïmouna Doucouré's directorial debut, which shows kids awkwardly trying to copy grown-up dance moves they see on social media.

As backlash grew across the Atlantic Ocean, the movie sparked interest here for another reason: Doucouré, who grew up in Paris, is the daughter of Senegalese immigrants. Her characters speak a mix of French and Wolof, the most widely used language in this West African nation. Her personal experiences shaped the story of an 11-year-old Senegalese girl who joins a preteen dance group.

"All my life, I have juggled two cultures: Senegalese and French,” Doucouré wrote this week in The Washington Post. "As a result, people often ask me about the oppression of women in more traditional societies. And I always ask: But isn't the objectification of women's bodies in Western Europe and the United States another kind of oppression?”

The American criticism surprised Kadia Ba, a 35-year-old lawyer in Dakar, who came with friends to watch "Cuties" under the stars.

She saw herself in Amy, the film's protagonist. Her parents are also Senegalese, and she grew up in Paris.

"I can fully understand what is going on here,” she said, laughing.

Doucouré's lens addressed such upbringings with a rare sensitivity and understanding, Ba said. Pressure to please her family weighed on her as a kid. Yet she wanted to feel accepted in a world where scantily clad women danced freely on TV.

"You sneak out of your house wearing makeup,” she said, "and wipe it off before seeing your dad.”

Doucouré interviewed more than 100 girls in Paris for research and worked with the French government's child protection authorities, as well as an on-set counselor. The director said she wanted to show the realities of their lives.

She found that girls see sexy videos on Instagram and TikTok, the endless stream of likes. They try to mimic that behavior, hoping it will make them popular.

"Spend an hour on social media and you'll see preteens -- often in makeup -- pouting their lips and strutting their stuff as if they were grown women,” Doucouré wrote in her op-ed. "The problem, of course, is that they are not women, and they don't realize what they are doing.”

In "Cuties,” Amy is torn between her family's traditional Muslim beliefs and the desire to fit in with the girls at school.

Outraged by her father's decision to marry a second wife, she pours her energy into a rebellious neighborhood dance crew. (Not really a spoiler alert: Preteen attempts at twerking are met with looks of disgust in the film.)

"Cuties" garnered praise at the Sundance Film Festival this year, where Doucouré won a directing award. Then Netflix promoted the film with photos of Amy and her friends in provocative poses. (The company has apologized for its marketing choice but defended the movie.)

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and other lawmakers urged the Justice Department to "investigate whether Netflix, its executives, or the filmmakers violated any federal laws against the production and distribution of child pornography.” A hashtag, #CancelNetflix, began trending.

No hint of controversy emerged at the Hotel du Phare on Tuesday. Viewers in masks occupied all 120 of the rooftop's chairs. Latecomers sat on the floor. People laughed at the dancing scenes. They clapped at the end.

The hotel's owner, Arthur Jadoul, wanted to screen "Cuties" after reading rave reviews in French media. He blamed Netflix for provoking the uproar abroad.

"For once there was a really good French film with a Senegalese director,” he said. "The poster is completely different from the content of the film. It's a shame that Netflix had to screw everything up.”

Magali Colombo, who works at an international bank in Dakar, thought the film captured the messiness of adolescence. She found the story's diversity refreshing.

As for exploitation?

"I mean, come on,” the 39-year-old said. "What about those American cheerleading shows with girls wearing makeup?”

Trolls target female-led blockbusters. Ahead of 'Captain Marvel,’ Rotten Tomatoes shut them down.





Links

Rotten Tomatoes

Top Movies, Rotten Tomatoes

Michael's Movie Mayhem LONG alphabetized list of sci-fi classics from the 50's and 60's - links contain pictures and plots; can buy here
ClassicSciFi.com LONG list in alphabetical order, also searchable by category, year, and director; not as complete as Michael's; includes A movies up through the 1990s; can't buy here
Amazon Classic Sci-Fi many good selections, most recent





Big Trouble in Little China





Big Trouble


Big Trouble (2002 film), Wikipedia

Big Trouble is a 2002 American gangster comedy film based on the novel Big Trouble by Dave Barry. It was directed by Barry Sonnenfeld and featured a large cast including Tim Allen, Rene Russo, Dennis Farina, Zooey Deschanel, Sofia Vergara and Jason Lee. Like much of Dave Barry's fiction, it follows a diverse group of people through a series of extremely strange and humorous situations against the backdrop of Miami.


Cast

Tim Allen as Eliot Arnold – A divorced man, fired from his job at the Miami Herald and running a struggling advertising agency. His teenage son Matt thinks he is a dork.

Rene Russo as Anna Herk – Jenny's devoted mother and the reluctant wife of Arthur (even though she thinks he's an idiot). She becomes immediately attracted to Eliot upon meeting him.

Stanley Tucci as Arthur Herk – A rude and obnoxious man marked for death for embezzling from his company.

Ben Foster as Matt Arnold – Eliot's son and the "killer" of Jenny. He also develops a crush on her.

Zooey Deschanel as Jenny Herk – Anna's daughter and a classmate of Matt. She is also Matt's target in the school's game "Killer".

Tom Sizemore and Johnny Knoxville as Snake Dupree and Eddie Leadbetter – Two bumbling ex-convicts.

Dennis Farina and Jack Kehler as Henry Desalvo and Leonard Ferroni – Two hitmen hired to kill Arthur for embezzling.

Janeane Garofalo as Officer Monica Romero – A competent police officer.

Patrick Warburton as Officer Walter Kramitz – Monica's incompetent fellow officer. Asks his partner Romero out on dates even though he's married.

Heavy D and Omar Epps as Special Agents Pat Greer and Alan Seitz – Two FBI agents determined to retrieve a missing nuclear bomb.

Jason Lee as Puggy – A homeless wanderer who loves Fritos and Nina.

Sofía Vergara as Nina – The Herks' teenaged Mexican housemaid. She falls in love with Puggy, who she initially mistook for Jesus.

Michael McShane as Bruce – The consumer from hell who constantly belittles Eliot's advertisement ideas for his products. He suffers several indignities at the hands of other characters during the movie.

DJ Qualls as Andrew Ryan – Matt's school friend and witness for when Matt "kills" Jenny.

Andy Richter as Jack Pendick – A security guard with a drinking problem. He sees Matt pointing a squirt gun at Jenny and gives chase while shooting at them with his handgun. Richter also plays Rick, Jack's twin brother, an equally incompetent security guard at the airport. (In the novel the two are brothers but not twins.)


Reception and controversy

Big Trouble was originally scheduled for release on September 21, 2001, and had a strong advertising push. The September 11, 2001, attacks of that year made the film's comedic smuggling of a nuclear device onto an airplane unpalatable. Consequently, the film was pushed back until April 2002, and the promotion campaign was toned down almost to the point of abandonment. Big Trouble came quietly to American theaters and left quickly afterwards, receiving mixed reviews and being generally ignored by audiences, becoming a box office bomb.[citation needed] It holds a 48% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 112 reviews, with the consensus reading "With its large cast and frantic comic pacing, Big Trouble labors for slapstick-style hilarity, but it never really gains steam."

~

Trailer, Big Trouble

V Big Trouble - 2002 - 2.22 hours

Big Trouble, 2002 - Rotten Tomatoes





Get Shorty, 1995

GET SHORTY - Trailer - (1995)





Men In Black





Fast Times at Ridgemont High

Song from Fast Times at Ridgemont High





The Meg

Cast of the Aeg

V The Meg - Best Scenes





Young Frankenstein (1974)

~

V Young Frankenstein (1974) Bloopers & Outtakes

TCM YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN(1974)

A descendant of Dr. Frankenstein sets out to make a man.

Dir: Mel Brooks Cast: Terry Garr , Cloris Leachman , Gene Wilder .

V Trailer

V Young Frankenstein 1974 Full Movie





Big Trouble in Little China





Big Trouble


Big Trouble (2002 film), Wikipedia

Big Trouble is a 2002 American gangster comedy film based on the novel Big Trouble by Dave Barry. It was directed by Barry Sonnenfeld and featured a large cast including Tim Allen, Rene Russo, Dennis Farina, Zooey Deschanel, Sofia Vergara and Jason Lee. Like much of Dave Barry's fiction, it follows a diverse group of people through a series of extremely strange and humorous situations against the backdrop of Miami.


Cast

Tim Allen as Eliot Arnold – A divorced man, fired from his job at the Miami Herald and running a struggling advertising agency. His teenage son Matt thinks he is a dork.

Rene Russo as Anna Herk – Jenny's devoted mother and the reluctant wife of Arthur (even though she thinks he's an idiot). She becomes immediately attracted to Eliot upon meeting him.

Stanley Tucci as Arthur Herk – A rude and obnoxious man marked for death for embezzling from his company.

Ben Foster as Matt Arnold – Eliot's son and the "killer" of Jenny. He also develops a crush on her.

Zooey Deschanel as Jenny Herk – Anna's daughter and a classmate of Matt. She is also Matt's target in the school's game "Killer".

Tom Sizemore and Johnny Knoxville as Snake Dupree and Eddie Leadbetter – Two bumbling ex-convicts.

Dennis Farina and Jack Kehler as Henry Desalvo and Leonard Ferroni – Two hitmen hired to kill Arthur for embezzling.

Janeane Garofalo as Officer Monica Romero – A competent police officer.

Patrick Warburton as Officer Walter Kramitz – Monica's incompetent fellow officer. Asks his partner Romero out on dates even though he's married.

Heavy D and Omar Epps as Special Agents Pat Greer and Alan Seitz – Two FBI agents determined to retrieve a missing nuclear bomb.

Jason Lee as Puggy – A homeless wanderer who loves Fritos and Nina.

Sofía Vergara as Nina – The Herks' teenaged Mexican housemaid. She falls in love with Puggy, who she initially mistook for Jesus.

Michael McShane as Bruce – The consumer from hell who constantly belittles Eliot's advertisement ideas for his products. He suffers several indignities at the hands of other characters during the movie.

DJ Qualls as Andrew Ryan – Matt's school friend and witness for when Matt "kills" Jenny.

Andy Richter as Jack Pendick – A security guard with a drinking problem. He sees Matt pointing a squirt gun at Jenny and gives chase while shooting at them with his handgun. Richter also plays Rick, Jack's twin brother, an equally incompetent security guard at the airport. (In the novel the two are brothers but not twins.)


Reception and controversy

Big Trouble was originally scheduled for release on September 21, 2001, and had a strong advertising push. The September 11, 2001, attacks of that year made the film's comedic smuggling of a nuclear device onto an airplane unpalatable. Consequently, the film was pushed back until April 2002, and the promotion campaign was toned down almost to the point of abandonment. Big Trouble came quietly to American theaters and left quickly afterwards, receiving mixed reviews and being generally ignored by audiences, becoming a box office bomb.[citation needed] It holds a 48% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 112 reviews, with the consensus reading "With its large cast and frantic comic pacing, Big Trouble labors for slapstick-style hilarity, but it never really gains steam."

~

Trailer, Big Trouble

V Big Trouble - 2002 - 2.22 hours

Big Trouble, 2002 - Rotten Tomatoes





Get Shorty, 1995

GET SHORTY - Trailer - (1995)





Men In Black





Fast Times at Ridgemont High

Song from Fast Times at Ridgemont High





The Meg

Cast of the Aeg

V The Meg - Best Scenes





Young Frankenstein (1974)

V Young Frankenstein (1974) Bloopers & Outtakes





The Three Musketeers, 1993

The Three Musketeers is a 1993 Austrian-American action-adventure comedy film from Walt Disney Pictures, Caravan Pictures, and The Kerner Entertainment Company, directed by Stephen Herek from a screenplay by David Loughery.

The Three Musketeers, 1993, IMBd

V The Three Musketeers (1993) Trailer

V The Three Musketeers (1993) - Retro Movie Review

V The Three Musketeers (1993) - One for all, All for one

THE THREE MUSKETEERS, Rotten Tomatoes




V Pulp Fiction - Dance Scene (HQ)





Norma Rae, 1979

Norma Rae, 1979

~

Brief Synopsis
A young single mother and her co-worker try to unionize the mill where they work.

Dir: Martin Ritt Cast: Sally Field , Beau Bridges , Ron Leibman .

NORMA RAE - (ORIGINAL TRAILER)





FORBIDDEN PLANET(1956)

~

TCM FORBIDDEN PLANET(1956)

A group of space troopers investigates the destruction of a colony on a remote planet.

Dir: Fred McLeod Wilcox Cast: Walter Pidgeon , Anne Francis , Leslie Nielsen .

Trailer





TRAIN, THE ( 1964)

~

TCM TRAIN, THE ( 1964)

French resistance fighters try to stop the Nazis from taking a trainload of art treasures to Germany.

Dir: John Frankenheimer Cast: Burt Lancaster , Paul Scofield , Jeanne Moreau .

The Train Theatrical Trailer (1964) Trailer

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MARTY(1955)

~

TCM MARTY(1955)

A lonely butcher finds love despite the opposition of his friends and family.

Dir: Delbert Mann Cast: Ernest Borgnine , Betsy Blair , Esther Minciotti .

Trailer





Kuffs, 1992

~

Kuffs, 1992

George Kuffs is a flake who's a high school drop out and who's irresponsible. When his girlfriend tells him she's pregnant he freaks out and she dumps him. He goes to his brother, Brad to ask him for money but Brad puts his foot down and tells George it's time to shape up. Brad runs a Special Police Force and tells George to work for him. Before he could decide, Brad is killed. George sees the man who killed him, but because he didn't actually see him kill his brother the man is released. George takes over his brother's district and sets out to get the man who killed his brother. The police assign a detective to keep an eye on him but George finds a way around him and nearly gets killed. His employees don't think he should be in charge. And a man approaches George and offers to buy his district which George thinks is suspicious. So he follows him too.

Christian Slater ... George Kuffs
Milla Jovovich ... Maya Carlton
Ric Roman Waugh ... Hood (as Ric Waugh)
Steve Holladay ... Hood
Chad Randall ... Hood
Clarke Coleman ... Hood
Leon Rippy ... Kane
Craig Benton ... Paint Store Owner
Ashley Judd ... Wife of Paint Store Owner

Trailer, IMDB

Trailer, YouTube

Kuffs 1992 Trailer | Christian Slater | Milla Jovovich

Milla Jovovich Time-Lapse Filmography - Through the years, Before and Now!

V Christian Slater & Christina Applegate Kill Any Dating Rumors

V Old Christian Slater Star Wars Commercial

V CHRISTIAN SLATER ● BIOGRAPHY ● House ● Cars ● Family ● Net worth ● 2018

V Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 TRAILER 1 (2014) - Christian Slater, Shia LaBeouf

V ARE YOU INSANE LIKE ME? // edit (JASON DEAN)

V Christian Slater on The Tonight Show (1996)

V Untamed Heart Official Trailer #1 - Christian Slater Movie (1993) Marisa Tomei

V Untamed Heart - Heaven

V 90's christian slater

V Bed of Roses Movie Trailer Christian Slater Mary Stuart Masterson

V Christian Slater & Bridget Fonda in "Professional Man"

V CALIFORNIA SKATE (1989) Con Christian Slater

V Why does Christian Slater keep playing outsiders?

V Christian Slater Shares Hilarious Stories About Jack Nicholson! | Good Morning Britain

V Christian Slater & Rami Malek Play "Firsts" | Celebrity Sit Down | E! News

V Robin Tunney/Christian Slater - Julian Po (1997)

V Kuffs (1992) - Clip: FistiKuffs (HD)

V El Gringo Official Trailer #1 (2012) - Christian Slater Movie HD

V El Gringo Official Trailer #1 (2012) - Christian Slater Movie HD

V Christian Slater Wins Best Supporting TV Actor, Says "Hi" To Harrison Ford

V CHRISTIAN SLATER has FUN with ARSENIO

V THE WIFE Official Trailer (2018) Christian Slater, Glenn Close Movie HD

V Christian Slater on Introducing Warren Beatty and Matching the Background

V Mr. Robot: Season 1 Cast Interview - Christian Slater

V Christian Slater Is A Hardcore Star Trek Nerd - CONAN on TBS

V Crime Inc. - Christian Slater, Tiananmen Square, Al Capone

V Christian Slater: Mr. Robot Q&A | Film 2015 | SXSW

V Rami Malek & Christian Slater on the TODAY Show discussing Mr Robot

V The Coal Thief read by Christian Slater

V PLAYBACK Super-Important DVD review, starring Christian Slater

V The Christian Slater interview - Top Gear - Series 5 - BBC

V The Wolf: The Hunt Continues ft. Christian Slater | HP

V The Wolf Starring Christian Slater | HP Studios

V Back To The Sea Official Trailer #1 (2012) - Christian Slater, Mark Hamill Movie HD

V Curb Your Enthusiasm: Christian Slater and the Caviar

V Making-Of "HARD RAIN" (FR) 1997 Morgan Freeman, Christian Slater

V Hard Rain (1998) Trailer

V Christian Slater, Rami Malek ​in '​Mr. Robot Season 2​'​ ​- TV Review

V The Legend of Billie Jean (1985) with Christian Slater, Keith Gordon, Helen Slater Movie

V Isn't that ... Christian Slater

V Christian Slater's Holiday Fun - Ellen

V Christian Slater In "Radio City Christmas Spectacular" as a Kid

V Spot the Fake Laugh w/ Mila Kunis & Christian Slater

V CYE: christian slater is a caviar whore and bad party gifts

V Glenn Close, Jonathan Pryce, Christian Slater, Annie Starke & Björn Runge Talk "The Wife"

V THE WIFE Official Trailer (2018) Christian Slater, Glenn Close Movie HD

V Kuffs 1992 Trailer | Christian Slater | Milla Jovovich

V SeaQuest DSV Promo - "Knight of Shadows"/SNL w/ Christian Slater and Matt Foley

V Christian Slater Calls Trump an 'Ass****' for Spending $300k on Putin Summit | TMZ

V Veronica & JD - Heathers: Photos (some are rare)

V Comedy || King Cobra (2016) HD1080p - Download Garrett Clayton

V Emilio Estevez , Alec Baldwin, Christian Slater at the Toronto International Film Festival

V Phineas and Ferb - Delivery of Destiny (with Christian Slater)

V Christian Slater On 'Mr. Robot,’ 'Archer,’ His Favorite Film He's Made | TODAY

V Mobsters 1991 Trailer | Christian Slater

V Christian Slater family

V Christian Slater and Rosario Dawson Segment

V Julian Po (1997) Official Trailer - Christian Slater, Robin Tunney Movie HD

V pump up the volume (1990) trailer

V Twisted (1986)

V 'Bullet To the Head' - Christian Slater as Marcus Baptiste - Cinemit Interview

V Christian Slater on Alias

V The Public Trailer #2 (2019) Christian Slater, Alec Baldwin Drama Movie HD

V True Romance (1993) Official Trailer # 1 - Christian Slater HD

V True Romance - The best "I love you" scene ever!

V Christian Slater C.I.A Infiltrator Trilogy: Heathers, Pump Up the Volume and Billie Jean

V CHRISTIAN SLATER ACCESSORY TO MURDER OF RIVER PHOENIX

V Christian Slater's New 'Archer' Season | TODAY

V Ultra-cool gun fight scene (KUFFS)

V Christian Slater | My Own Worst Enemy | NBC | Promo | 2008

V Emmy Contender: Globe Winner Christian Slater Spills 'Mr. Robot' Secret

V On The Bus-Christian Slater - Extreme Makeover Home Edition

V Colors »Ask me Anything

V Rites Of Passage TRAILER 1 (2012) - Wes Bentley, Christian Slater Movie HD

V Robin Tunney/Christian Slater - Julian Po (1997)

--------------------

V Jerry Seinfeld HBO Debut - 1981

V JOHNNY CARSON INTERVIEW JIM CARREY Nov 24 1983

V Losing Arguments with Your Wife After Her Brain Surgery - Jim Gaffigan

V Charles Bronson's body was probably carved from the side of a mountain

V Charles Bronson vs. Muggers

\ V Charles Bronson just wants a drink

V The Terminator









Trailer

V Hopscotch 1980 Full Movie

V Hopscotch (1980) -- (Movie Clip) The Other Figaro










MARLOWE(1969)


Typical police proceedural. But the standout is James Garner and an interesting cast.

~

Detective Philip Marlowe probes the seedy underbelly of Los Angeles in search of a woman's missing sister.

Dir: Paul Bogart Cast: James Garner, Gayle Hunnicutt, Carroll O'Connor, Rita Moreno, Sharon Farrell, H. M. Wynant, Jackie Coogan, Bruce Lee.

~

Trailer









Arrival, 2016

Linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) leads an elite team of investigators when gigantic spaceships touch down in 12 locations around the world. As nations teeter on the verge of global war, Banks and her crew must race against time to find a way to communicate with the extraterrestrial visitors. Hoping to unravel the mystery, she takes a chance that could threaten her life and quite possibly all of mankind.


Trailer, Official

Initial release: November 11, 2016 (Russia)
Director: Denis Villeneuve
Screenplay: Eric Heisserer
Awards: Academy Award for Best Sound Editing, MORE
Languages: English, Russian, Standard Mandarin

Arrival (film), Wikipedia

Arrival is a 2016 American science fiction film directed by Denis Villeneuve [Dune, Bladerunner] and written by Eric Heisserer [The Thing, 2011, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Bird Box]. It is based on the 1998 short story, "Story of Your Life" by Ted Chiang, and stars Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, and Forest Whitaker. The film follows a linguist enlisted by the U.S. Army to discover how to communicate with aliens who have arrived on Earth, before tensions lead to war.

The film had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival on September 1, 2016, and was released in the United States and Canada by Paramount Pictures on November 11, 2016. It grossed $203 million worldwide and received praise for Adams's performance, Villeneuve's direction, and its exploration of communicating with extraterrestrial intelligence. Considered one of the best films of 2016, Arrival appeared on numerous critics' year-end lists,[4] and was selected by the American Film Institute as one of ten "Movies of the Year".

It received eight nominations at the 89th Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay, and won for Best Sound Editing. It also received Golden Globe nominations for Best Actress for Adams and Best Original Score for Jóhann Jóhannsson,[6] and was awarded the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation and the Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation in 2017. The score by Jóhannsson was nominated for Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media at the 60th Grammy Awards.

Plot

Linguist Louise Banks's daughter, Hannah, dies in adolescence from an incurable illness.

Twelve extraterrestrial spacecraft hover over disparate locations around the Earth. A U.S. Army officer, Colonel G.T. Weber, recruits Banks and physicist Ian Donnelly to find out why the aliens have come. Weber takes them to an army encampment in Montana near one of the craft. On board, Banks and Donnelly make contact with two seven-limbed aliens, whom they call "heptapods"; Donnelly nicknames them Abbott and Costello. Banks and Donnelly begin researching their written language of complicated circular symbols. As Banks studies the language, she starts to have visions of a child who seems to be her daughter.

When Banks is able to establish sufficient shared vocabulary to ask why the aliens have come, they answer, "Offer weapon". However, China translates this as, "Use weapon", prompting them to break off communications, and other nations follow. Banks argues that the symbol interpreted as "weapon" might mean "tool", and that China's translation likely results from the competitive nature of their interaction with the aliens.

Rogue soldiers plant a bomb in the Montana craft. Unaware, Banks and Donnelly re-enter the alien vessel, and the aliens give them an extremely complex message. Just before the bomb explodes, one of the aliens ejects Donnelly and Banks, knocking them unconscious. When they reawaken, the military is preparing to evacuate, and the craft has moved out of reach.

Donnelly discovers that the symbol for time is present throughout the message, and that the writing occupies exactly one-twelfth of the space in which it is projected. Banks suggests that the full message is split among the twelve craft, and the aliens want all the nations to share what they learn.

China's General Shang issues an ultimatum to the aliens, demanding that they leave within 24 hours. Russia, Pakistan, and Sudan follow suit.

Banks goes alone to the craft, and it sends down a transport pod. One of the aliens is dying from the explosion; the other explains that they have come to help humanity, for in 3,000 years they will need humanity's help in return. The "weapon" is their language, which changes humans' linear perception of time, allowing them to experience "memories" of future events. Banks's visions of the child are actually premonitions of her future daughter, Hannah.

Banks returns to the camp as it is being evacuated and tells Donnelly that the alien language is the "tool"; those who master it are able to perceive the future and past. She has a premonition of a United Nations event, in which Shang thanks her for having convinced him to call off the attack by calling his private number and reciting his wife's dying words: "In war there are no winners, only widows."

In the present, Banks steals a satellite phone, calls the number, and recites the words. The Chinese announce they are standing down and release their twelfth of the message. The other countries follow suit, and the twelve craft depart.

During the evacuation of the camp, Donnelly expresses his love for Banks. They talk about life choices and whether he would change them if he could see the future. Banks knows that she will agree to have a child with him despite knowing their fate: that Hannah will die, and Donnelly will leave them after she reveals that she knew this.

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Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis and its Implications in the Movie "Arrival”, Medium 18 Dec 2018

By Mounna Tamek

1. Introduction

"Arrival" is an American science fiction movie directed by Denis Villeneuve and published in 2016 based on the short story "The story of your life" by Ted Chiang (Poll). In the movie,12 alien spacecrafts went to 12 different nations on Earth, including the US, Russia, China, and Pakistan. Experts in various fields must decode the aliens' presence and their language. A linguist was called upon to translate the aliens' language and understand why they appeared in different parts of the world before launching a global war. The movie employs one of the popular linguistic theories called Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, which is a theory that suggests that people's thoughts are determined by the language they speak.

There are two versions of this theory; the strong version or the linguistics determinism is less accepted by the linguists and it states that all human thoughts are determined by the language they speak, and the weak version or what is called linguistics relativisms implies that language shapes people's thoughts "Ask A Linguist FAQ.”

2. Thesis

The movie portrayed the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in three different ways: the hard version which is portrayed in Louise's physiological alteration after learning the language, the intermediate version depicted in the barriers of translation between aliens and humans and the possibility for misinterpretation due to entirely different languages, bodies, and worlds, and the soft version which is reflected in the different discourses (but in the same language) of specialists (linguists, mathematicians, military officials, etc.).

Shedding light on this widely unaccepted theory has numerous implications that are mostly centered around the importance of language and communication.

3. Background information: Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis

The "Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis" also known as the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis is defined by the American anthologist and linguist E. Sapir in his article, "The Status of Linguistics as a science' and also elaborated upon by B.L. Whorf in his article "Science and Linguistics" (Hussein).

This hypothesis stands for the fact that language plays a very significant role in people's lives because it is not just a way to communicate, but it has an influence on people's behavior and their way of the thinking (Hussein). In other words, people who speak differently tend to have different points of views about the world. The theory goes that the language, not only diction but also the syntax, does not just impact how people communicate with one another, but also how speakers of a language, and polyglots by extension visualize and interact with the world on a basic level.

This inextricable relationship between language and worldview is the underlying concern not just of linguists, but storytellers, particularly the recent film "Arrival.” Sapir's views on the relationship between language and culture are clearly expressed in the following passage taken from his book Language:

Human beings do not live in the objective world alone, nor alone in the world of social activity as ordinarily understood, but are very much at the mercy of the particular language which has become the medium of expression for their society. It is quite an illusion to imagine that one adjusts to reality essentially without the use of language and that language is merely an incidental means of solving specific problems of communication or reflection. The fact of the matter is that the real world is to a large extent unconsciously built up on the language habits of the group…We see and hear and otherwise experience very largely as we do because the language habits of our community predispose certain choices of interpretation. (Sapir 207).

Sapir and Whorf had no shared hypothesis together on language; it was until Sapir died that Whorf started studying Sapir's ideas (Penko). Whorf's theory originated in his study of Eskimo vocabulary for snow. He argued that because "people lived so intimately with the snow of the Arctic, they had developed far more terms to describe it than people of other cultures" (Penko). Then, Whorf wrote. "The grammar of each language is not merely a reproducing instrument for voicing ideas but rather is itself the shaper of ideas" (Penko).

This hypothesis was eventually dismissed by some linguistics such as Chomskey, who said that languages share something in common, and the linguist Steven Pinker who claims his 1994 book The Language Instinct that "the more you examine Whorf's arguments, the less sense they make.” Nevertheless, some linguists reconsidered this hypothesis, and they embraced it, such as the linguist Lera Boroditsky who studied Pormpuraaw tribes and discovered that their perception of time was different not because of the language they speak, but because it "relates to cardinal directions" (Penko).

4. How is the Hypothesis portrayed in the movie? The hard version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis can be seen in Louise's physiological alteration after she studied the alien language. The alien language in the movie does not have a beginning or an end and it is circular unlike human language which is leaner. When the linguist Louis is asked to decipher the alien language, she starts seeing the world differently; her perception of time changes.

There are different scenes that show Louis perception of time alteration. One of them, when Louis was attempting to decipher the aliens' language sitting on her desk, she was having flash forwards of her daughter. The daughter was showing her a picture of her mom and dad. Another scene shows that Louis was imagining her daughter old talking to her and asking her about the meaning of a specific word, and then she imagined herself giving birth to her baby, then she imagined herself having a daughter who had a cancer. All this is her future, but she can see it in her present.

While she was trying to decipher the alien language, she started dreaming in that language and having flash wards, and that is one of the key points discussed in Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.

The intermediate version is reflected in the barriers of translation between aliens and humans and the possibility for misinterpretation due to entirely different languages, bodies, and worlds. The barrier of language is clearly depicted in the movie. There is a scene that shows Louis confusion when she heard the word "weapon" used by the aliens. In the scene, when Louis went to the aliens by herself, she asked them to send a message and they said, "Louis has weapon,” while the aliens were saying that, the camera was capturing Louis facial expressions which showed clear confusion and uncertainty about the word's meaning.

Then there was a reestablishment shot that captured the alien sign for "use weapon.” Also, when Louis told the team about the alien's use of the word 'weapon,’ they were very worried because they thought that the word had the same meaning in English, which they thought was posing a threat on [sic] humanity. However, Louis was trying to explain to them that the word may mean something else in the alien language and she was right because at the end it turned out that the word meant "gift,” so the aliens were there to give a gift to humanity.

According to Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, words may mean different things in different languages, and this should be taken into consideration because having different languages may lead to misinterpretation.

The soft version of Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is reflected in the different discourses of specialists who have different views about solving the issue because of their different backgrounds. When the aliens arrived, the colonel Weber called the linguist Louis and the Mathematician Ian to join other team contained of military officials. Their visions towards the alien language was different because they had different backgrounds. When Weber, Ian and Louis all were in the airplane, they talked about the different ways to understand the aliens. Weber said, "we need to know where they are from,” then Ian said that "we need to know how the aliens got here,” and while trying to say the other mathematics-related questions, Louis interrupted him by saying "how about talking to them before throwing math problem at them.”

In other words, Ian, the mathematician, sees that the best way to understand the aliens is to use math and logic, while Louis, the linguist, thinks that the best way is to understand their language and have relationship with them. However, Weber thinks that the best way is to understand why they are there instead of wasting time trying to make relationship with them. This shows that clashes may exist even between people who speak the same language because of their different backgrounds.

5. The implications of using Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis in the movie

Employing Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in the movie "Arrival" has many implications and most of them are centered around the importance of language and communication. Eves Goddard a curator and linguist in the National Museum of Natural History's Department of Anthropology claims that using this hypothesis in the movie is done to show the significance of language because people are oblivious of [sic] how it really works, and he also claims that "it is not about aliens, it is about us" (Penko).

Language and communication play a significant role in creating peace all over the world. The movie wants us to see language differences not as a threat, yet as something beneficial that even helps the whole world. This can be seen when the political leaders and others in the movie were unwilling to communicate with the aliens thinking that the aliens were positing a danger on the world; however, the linguist was trying to persuade them that understanding them may save humans.

When they were trying to decipher the language, the word "weapon" was used by the aliens, which made the political leaders even more worried, but the linguist was attempting to explain to them that the word may mean something else in their language and she was right because at the end, it turned out that the word meant "gift.” Altogether, communication is the best way to avoid misunderstanding.

We live in such a chaotic world, innocent people are killed, political leaders were not able to solve this, and no one was able to solve it, so choosing a linguist to do this job is very telling because when we talk about a linguist, we talk about language.

The idea is that peace can be achieved by trying to understand others.

In the movie, the linguist was able to prevent a huge catastrophe which was a conflict between humans and aliens. Politicians, military personnel, and political leaders saw the alien language as a threat. Louis, the linguist, understood that the leaders' reaction and analysis to the alien languages was not because of them, yet it was because of the language they spoke that made them see the alien language as 'the other" (Poll). This created the binary opposition of 'us' vs 'them,’ which made the world a place of competition and conflict (Poll).

Accordingly, she tried to persuade them that communication with the aliens was very important. For example, in the movie China was planning to attack the aliens, yet because the linguist was able to see the future, she tried to reach out to the Chinese leader and asked him not to do that. The Chinese leader changed his mind and did not attack the aliens. We see him in one scene thanking Louise for stopping him from attacking the aliens. This is very significant because it explains that not everything is solved by violence, and that communication is the best way to solve problems. This was clearly stated by Louis in the preface of her book and read loudly by Ian, "language is the first weapon drawn in conflicts.”

To stop the Chinese General from launching an attack on the alien, Louis told him his wife's words which are "In war there are no winners, only widows" (Martinilli). These words stopped the leader from attacking the aliens. If we dig deeply into the meaning of these words, it emphasizes the point I made earlier. War is not the best solution, war is going to cause many men to die, which will result in having orphans and widows. This sentence said by the general's wife and used by Louis to stop war has many connotations. It stresses the importance of language as a uniting tool and it is the best way the solve conflicts between countries.

The same idea was discussed by Rawan Hooper in his article, "The science behind the movie 'Arrival’.” Hooper claims that in most of sci fi movies, they send "gun-toting heroes" to combat the aliens, yet this time they send a linguist that is played by Amy Adams. Some of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis supporters "think that the cognitive benefits of language helped spur its evolution" and that what is discussed in the movie that the fate of humanity and that of the aliens depend on our understanding of the alien language (Hooper).

Hooper also implies that the movie using Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is done to transmit a specific message to all people, it is to let people know the power of language in solving so many conflicts. He stated that clearly when he said "In fact, "Arrival" is far more about human understanding, memory, love and fortitude than it is about an alien invasion.”

Julian Setian in her article "Award winning arrival demonstrates the importance of language,” maintains that trying to overcome our fears and be open to learn other languages and other cultures is a very significant theme in the movie. Louis said to government officials that "we need to make sure they understand the difference between a weapon and a tool, because language is messy, and one can be both.”

This is a call not to rush and to take time to figure out what they mean because one word may mean something different in other languages. The movie changes from focusing on the alien encounter to focusing on the importance of understanding the others and the importance of language in communication. Setian concludes that "the movie's lesson is that taking time to communicate cross-culturally with openness, sympathy and humility can lead to our developing a mutual understanding with others, which can have a positive effect on the world.”

William Dass talks about language in the movie and he focuses on Amy Louis Interaction with the colonel Weber. He claims that language is not just lexicon, because a person may read a text with words that he understands, but when they are put together, he would not be able to know what they mean.

That is how Weber and Louis interaction is. He maintains that they have two different backgrounds, she is there to question the aliens and understand their answer and he is there to know their intent and act accordingly for the safety of the country. Weber is not interested in learning how to talk to them. His job and his background as a colonel makes him impatient with Louis and even rushing her.

They have the same language and the same concern to make the country safe, but they approach the issue differently. Here he mentions the Sapir Whorf Hypothesis, and he says that "communication is way more than just words.” His idea is that even if we speak the same language, sometimes culture and the context stand as an obstacle behind mutual understanding. At the end, he makes the connection between Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in the movie and the 2016 election.

He addresses how the movie helps him alleviate the frustration caused by the 2016 election results because he realizes the importance of communication. He says that this is because in this country, there is no political communication. He decides to have more communication with other people no matter how different their ideas are, which will solve the problem of bigotry in the country.

The movie is about how different people respond to a human crisis and how they all get together despite their different discourses. As the aliens appeared in 12 countries, The USA army put the best people to solve the crisis. The message is that humanity is best when humanity works together (“What Arrivals say about Humanity”).

For example, Louis and Ian meet despite having different ways on how to approach the issue. Ian thinks more mathematically and more logically to solve the problem and Louis is thinking on [sic] how to connect with aliens and have a relation with them. Despite their differences, Ian joins Louis to do the job.

This film was produced in 2016, a time of the election. That is a powerful message, that working together is the best way to solve a problem despite the differences (“What Arrivals say about Humanity”). It does not matter if you a Republican or a Democrat, working together is the best way to help America.

The importance of language and communication is further tackled in the movie by using symbolism (“Arrival's Ending Explained: Language and Symbolism”). The movie stresses a different form of communication by using symbolism. Having several shots of the shape of the spacecraft, which looks like contact lenses, indicates that "you should open your eyes" to see the world clearly (“Arrival's Ending Explained: Language and Symbolism”). In addition, there is a story said by Louis to Weber, and when she finishes, she admits to Ian that the story is not true, but it proves her point. [Kangeroo means "I don't know"]

What the whole movie is all about, its story is not true, but it conveys a significant message, which is the power of language and communication in resolving conflicts.

6. Conclusion

The movie argues that language will always be imperfect and imperfectly transferable and expressible, but that the attempt to understand, the attempt, sincere and divorced from ulterior motives, to understand another is the only way to bring about positive changes in the world. Success is unnecessary and arguably impossible. It's the trying that matters.

Mounna Tamek, English and Arabic tutor, Arabic-English translator. Student at George Mason University.









THE MATING GAME(1959)

A tax agent falls for a farm girl whose father he's investigating.

Dir: George Marshall Cast: Debbie Reynolds , Tony Randall , Paul Douglas .

Trailer, Official

Movie Clips

IRRESPONSIBLE PEOPLE

Paul Douglas, playing "Pop Larkin," narrates the opening, leading to co-star Debbie Reynolds singing the title tune, in The Mating Game, 1959, also starring Tony Randall.

Without warning, auditor Lorenzo (Tony Randall), given a "special" drink, leaps into Cole Porter's "Under My Skin," baffling Mariette (Debbie Reynolds), her family, and his boss (Fred Clark)


THE GLASS BOTTOM BOAT(1966)

A woman writing a scientist's biography is mistaken for a spy.

Dir: Frank Tashlin Cast: Doris Day , Rod Taylor , Arthur Godfrey .

Trailer

Original Promo Featurette


THE PRIZE(1963)

An American Nobel Prize-winner mixes it up with spies when he travels to Stockholm to collect his award.

Dir: Mark Robson Cast: Paul Newman, Edward G. Robinson, Elke Sommer, Diane Baker, Micheline Presle, Leo G. Carroll.

Trailer


LADY L(1966)

A beautiful laundress rises through European society.

Dir: Peter Ustinov Cast: Sophia Loren, Paul Newman, David Niven.

Trailer









INHERIT THE WIND(1960)

Dir: Stanley Kramer Cast: Spencer Tracy, Fredric March, Gene Kelly, Dick York, Harry Morgan.

In the twenties, a schoolteacher creates a national furor when he breaks the law against teaching evolution.

Trailer

V Movie Inntro, Mark Mothersbaugh

V Bob Newhart, guest programmer









Thunderheart, 1992

When a series of murders stuns a small Native American reservation, the FBI sends in agent Ray Levoi (Val Kilmer) to investigate. While Ray is relatively inexperienced, he is one quarter Sioux, and the FBI hopes that will make it easier for them to gather information from the locals. While the reservation police officer (Graham Greene) views the agent as an outsider, the tribal elder (Chief Ted Thin Elk) believes him to be the reincarnated spirit of Thunderheart, a Native American hero.

Trailer

TCM THUNDERHEART(1992)

An FBI man gets back in touch with his Native roots investigating a murder on a reservation.

V THUNDERHEART (1992) -- (MOVIE CLIP) ARROWS ON THE PRAIRIE

V THUNDERHEART (1992) -- (MOVIE CLIP) WASHINGTON REDSKIN

THUNDERHEART (1992) -- (MOVIE CLIP) BUSTED ARM









Tremors


TREMORS(1990)

Two country handymen, Earl Basset and Valentine McKee, discover that their desolate town of Perfection, Nevada is infested with gigantic man-eating wormlike creatures that live below ground. The slightest vibration caused by movement attract the creatures to attack without warning, exploding out of the ground with jaws opened to swallow with deadly precision. The race is on to overcome these slimy subterraneans as the two unlikely heroes team up with a couple of zany characters, Burt and Heather Gummer, along with a shapely seismology student.

Dir. Ron Underwood, Steve Wilson, Cast Kevin Bacon, Reba Mcentire, Fred Ward, Finn Carter, Charlotte Stewart, Michael Dan Wagner, John Goodwin, Victor Wong, Michael Gross, Ariana Richards, John Pappas, Bobby Jackoby

Trailer

TREMORS II: AFTERSHOCKS(1996)

ALSO KNOWN AS: TREMORS 2: AFTERSHOCKS

Those giant subterranean creatures that terrorized a desert town in the original comedy-thriller "Tremors" (1990) are now plowing their way through Mexican oil fields, gobbling up everything and everyone around. The Mexican government, desperate to stop this reign of terror, has offered to pay fifty thousand dollars a head for hunting the man-eating Gabroids--and only one man can stop them: Earl Basset! The same man who stopped them before, and who, unlike the rest of his Nevadan neighbors, has been unable to make a profit from his earlier adventure. With dim ranching prospects, and encouragement from young, would-be worm hunter Grady Hoover, Earl decides once again to try his hand at his old heroic craft--Graboid hunting. So, financially challenged Earl and Grady head south in his beat-up jeep, ready for a challenging mission--however what they don't know is that the Graboids have some new tricks up their sleeves!

Dir Steve Wilson, Cast Fred Ward, Michael Gross, Helen Shaver,

Trailer

TREMORS 3: RETURN TO PERFECTION(2001)

The pre-Cambrian predators return to wreak havoc on a small Nevada town -- except this time they have some help from a horde of killer wasps,

Dir Brett Maddock, Michael Gross, Ariana Richards, Charlotte Stewart, Susan Chuang

Trailer

TREMORS 4: THE LEGEND BEGINS(2004)

In the mining town of Rejection, Nevada in 1889, an unseen menace has begun terrorizing the inhabitants and eating up the mining resources, and therefore the profits, of mines owned by one Hiram Gummer, great-grandfather to future monster-hunter Burt Gummer. When Hiram brings in a mercenrary to stop the deadly creatures, an all-out fight to the finish takes place across the streets of Rejection and underground in the dark mines.

Dir Steve Wilson, Cast Michael Gross, Sara Botsford, Brent Roam, Ming Lo, August Schellenberg

Trailer

TREMORS 5: BLOODLINES(2015)

The giant, man-eating Graboids return to terrorize the inhabitants of a South African wildlife reserve. But Burt Gummer is also back along with his tech savvy apprentice Travis to do battle with the underground monsters.

Dir Don Michael Paul, Cast Ian Roberts, Lawrence Joffe, Natalie Becker, Jamie Kennedy, Michael Gross, Pearl Thusi

Trailer

TREMORS 6: A COLD DAY IN HELL(2018)

Dir Allison Pregler, Cast Allison Pregler

Trailer









RIO BRAVO(1959), TCM

Dir: Howard Hawks Cast: John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson, Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond.

A sheriff enlists a drunk, a kid and an old man to help him fight off a ruthless cattle baron.

Trailer









CABARET(1972), TCM

~

Trailer

Dir: Bob Fosse, Cast: Liza Minnelli, Michael York, Helmut Griem, Joel Grey, Fritz Wepper, Marisa Berenson.

A young writer gets mixed up with a pleasure-loving singer in the decadent world of 1930s Berlin.

CABARET (1972) -- (MOVIE CLIP) MEIN HERR
The M-C (Joel Grey) calls Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) to the stage at the Kit-Kat Club, where she performs Mein Herr

CABARET (1972) -- (MOVIE CLIP) BERLIN, 1931
The opening is all director Bob Fosse and Joel Grey as the never-named Master Of Ceremonies, though the song is from the John Kander and Fred Ebb Broadway musical, and Michael York as innocent Englishman Brian is introduced in passing

CABARET (1972) -- (MOVIE CLIP) DIDN'T YOU JUST SCREAM?
On their first quasi-date in Berlin, English Brian (Michael York) and American Sally (Liza Minnelli) enjoy the train, and director Bob Fosse inter-cuts the M-C (Joel Grey) with a Nazi gang-bashing

CABARET (1972) -- (MOVIE CLIP) MAYBE THIS TIME Sally (Liza Minnelli), with Brian (Michael York) after a successful tryst, cut with her performance of Maybe This Time by John Kander and Fred Ebb









CHICAGO(2002), TCM

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In the Roaring Twenties, a murderess tries to turn her trial into a ticket to fame.

Dir: Rob Marshall, Cast: Renée Zellweger [Roxie], Catherine Zeta-Jones [Thelms], Richard Gere [Billy the lawyer], Queen Latifa, John C. Reilly [Roxie's husband], Christine Baranski, based on Bob Fosse book

Trailer

Chicago - Razzle Dazzle

Making of Chicago - All that Jazz

Mr. Cellophane - John C. Reilly









Prizzi's Honor

Anjelica Huston-Prizzi's Honor-"You wanna do it Charlie" scene









Badass

Gene Hackman is Badass









Dirty Harry

Dirty Harry "Excuse me captain, can you fly?"

clint eastwood "i want to take you bowling"









Midnight Run

Midnight Run - The Airport scene


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Hot Fuzz

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Okja

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God bless Bong Joon-ho. The director of The Host, The Mother, and Snowpiercer -- all of which you owe it to yourself to see -- brought arguably his weirdest movie yet to Netflix in this sci-fi dramedy about a giant pig. Say what you will about the film's flights of fancy -- or Jake Gyllenhaal's truly committed performance -- there ain't nothing else like it on Netflix. - Vulture<

V The Host (2006) – Trailer

V Mother Official HD Trailer - From the Director of THE HOST

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V PERSONAL SHOPPER Official Trailer (2017) Kristen Stewart Movie HD

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Pulp Fiction Official Trailer #1 - (1994) HD

Punch-Drunk Love Look, another Adam Sandler movie on this list that's not one of his Netflix Originals! P.T. Anderson's delicate Sandler vehicle could kind of be called a rom-com, but it's not like any rom-com you've ever seen. It's one of PTA's best movies, a funny, strange, unforgettable story of two outsiders finding a way to be inside together. - Vulture

Punch-Drunk Love 2002 Trailer HD

Scarface Brian De Palma's 1983 remake of the 1932 classic became more of a cultural phenomenon than even writer Oliver Stone or star Al Pacino could have predicted. They couldn't have known how many Scarface posters would adorn college dorm walls or how many people would still be quoting the movies almost four decades later. It's an imperfect movie made classic by the complete commitment to it from De Palma and Pacino, two men near the peak of their powers when they collaborated on this drug epic. - Vulture

Scarface Trailer HD (1983)

A Serious Man More Coen brothers! When Netflix added Buster Scruggs, they dropped a few earlier films as well, including this underrated comedy about a man dealing with the inequity of life after his wife leaves him. With a great performance by Michael Stuhlbarg, this one has some of the Coens' best darkly comic bits in the back half of their career. - Vulture

A Serious Man - Official Trailer









NEVER A DULL MOMENT(1968), TCM

Brief Synopsis
Actor Jack Albany, who plays gangsters on TV, is mistaken for notorious hit-man Ace, and is hired by mob boss Leo Smooth to pull a heist, but Jack must find a way out of it.

Dir: Jerry Paris Cast: Dick Van Dyke, Edward G. Robinson, Dorothy Provine, Slim Pickens, Jack Elam, Ned Glass, .

Trailer









Dino King, Full Movie

YouTube Movies

Meet Speckles. He's a Tarbosaurus, and lives a happy life in his forest home with his mom and siblings. Until one day, as he's just learning to hunt, he encounters One-Eye, a Tyrannosaur looking for a new place to live. His herd is attacked, leaving poor Speckles alone in the world. But when he meets Blue Eyes, another lonely and lost Tarbosaur, they become close companions - and then, over time, a family of their own.










Keanu Reeves

Keanu Reeves Is Whatever You Want Him to Be

People project onto the star of the 'Matrix' and 'John Wick' series what they want to see in themselves. 'Dude, this is me in the future,’ one fan said.

Keanu Reeves on Good Morning, America - 7/9/91

Why We Can't Stop Watching Keanu Reeves, 30 Years On

Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images

His longevity and recent resurgence all come down to his particular blend of vulnerability and mystery

In his 14 minutes of screentime in Always Be My Maybe, Netflix's latest rom-com phenomenon, 54-year-old Keanu Reeves -- now 30 years into his stardom -- skewers and subverts the personas we've come to attach to him.

Reeves, playing an outsized version of himself, cuts an imposing figure in his introduction. Time slows to a crawl. All eyes gravitate toward the velvet-jacketed figure with striking beauty and prickly charisma. After his entrance -- a show for everyone in the farcical restaurant Maximal -- he slides toward Ali Wong's celebrity chef Sasha, offering spiritual platitudes in the face of her unfettered lust. "I missed your thumbs,” she breathily exhales. "I missed your soul" is his reply.

It's a maniacally delightful performance that both reminds audiences of Reeves's place in Asian-American Hollywood history and allows him to flex improvisational skills as he cycles through the various masks we have grafted onto him. There's the impossibly otherworldly Keanu, who says with utmost sincerity, "The only stars that matter are the ones that you see when you dream.” There's action-star Keanu, who smashes a vase against his own head in a game of Icebreaker and easily puts the jealous protagonist, Marcus (Randall Park), in a headlock -- fully committed, physically graceful, and beautifully dangerous. The Keanu of internet memes and viral threads is here, too, in the very fact that he's playing himself.

Reeves is having a dynamite year with the success of Always Be My Maybe, the outrageously violent John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum, and Toy Story 4, in which he plays Canada's greatest stunt driver, Duke Caboom. (Another sly nod perhaps? While born in Beirut, Reeves -- who is of Chinese-Hawaiian and British ancestry -- was raised in Toronto.) The actor's more recent evolution into a meme may flatten his complexities, but it does signal why he has endured all this time, despite the persistent claim that he's a bad actor, or just a limited one.

As I've contended in the past, this is a gross misreading of a great actor. In her tremendous 2007 masterwork The Star Machine, film professor and historian Jeanine Basinger praises Reeves amongst his generational contemporaries: "Reeves is a neo-star fighting the concept of stardom itself, working steadily against persona to the point where no one has a clear idea of who Reeves is onscreen anymore. This has hurt him, but it has also allowed him to maintain versatility that means more to him than fame. […] His career would have been limited, and thus short lived. Instead, he has used his freedom to move on and slowly force audiences to accept him as a real actor.”

Just take a look at the arc of his career -- as a teenager going through an existential crisis in the blackhearted wonder River's Edge (1986); the affably dimwitted Theodore "Ted" Logan from Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure (1989) and its sequel; the bodaciously supple and yearning FBI agent and surfer Johnny Utah in Point Break (1991); a bruisingly courteous SWAT officer in Speed (1994); the beatific savior Neo in The Matrix (1999); the violent redneck in The Gift (2000); an occult detective radiating self-loathing and suicidal yearnings in Constantine (2005); and of course, the titular tenderhearted and violently dangerous assassin of the John Wick franchise. In looking at all of his performances, I am reminded of what the great Roger Ebert wrote in his review of the Bill & Ted sequel back in the early '90s: "I have seen Keanu Reeves in vastly different roles (the FBI man in the current Point Break, for example), and am a little astonished by the range of these performances.”

Throughout his career, Reeves has eschewed obvious transformation in favor of something trickier and more subtle. What has allowed him to remain a star, 30 years later, is a blend of virility, vulnerability, and an aura of mystery, hearkening to a bygone era of stardom that contradicts the current moment, which requires stars to seem endlessly accessible; his sheer joy for the medium that makes him a cinematic sensualist; his racial dimensions as a star; and his gimlet-eyed understanding of the female gaze. These qualities are unique in the current market of stardom in Hollywood, allowing him to straddle various cinematic contexts with ease -- mainstream romantic comedies, somber indie flicks, gloriously decadent action flicks.

They come through in one of his earliest films, My Own Private Idaho, a meditative character study about two young hustlers -- Mike Waters (River Phoenix), a shy narcoleptic in search of a sense of home, and the strikingly beautiful Scott Favor (Reeves), a trust-fund kid slumming it until his inheritance kicks in at 21. Reeves and his late co-star imbue their characters with a particular mix of virility, vulnerability, and mystery. I'd argue that all the greatest leading men in the annals of Hollywood stardom have existed at this intersection to varying degrees -- something I feel has been lacking from modern male stars, partially because they are being formed in franchises that lack interest in the visceral aspects of humanity. (It helps that Reeves has declined offers to join Marvel, even though they've been trying to woo him to their stable for years.)

Humphrey Bogart's cool is consistently undercut by his own anger and self-loathing. William Holden held something dark behind his megawatt smile and gleaming blond locks. Paul Newman always felt a touch remote, like he was hiding bruised aspects of himself from the audience. Marlon Brando, of course, epitomizes these qualities. Reeves is brimming with similar contradictions. He reflects this tradition by being at once beatifically still and emotionally expressive, defined by loneliness and a yearning to be saved from it.

In My Own Private Idaho, Reeves is the object of desire not only for Mike but the camera itself. Deep into the film, Mike timidly reveals his love to Scott while they camp out in the desert, a fire crackling before them. Phoenix plays Mike as wild with energy he has no real outlet for, leading to an awkward physicality. Reeves grants his character a languid brio. He takes up space, laying close to the fire, his head dipped back to study Mike as he timidly expresses his feelings. He's outstretched, willowy, and aware of Mike's gaze; he examines the weight of it. The scene reveals one of Reeves's greatest skills as an actor: being an active listener. As he studies Mike, he invites and toys with his feelings. "I only have sex with a guy for money,” he notes offhandedly as if it were a random truth, not a response to a declaration of love. But just as the prickliness of his character comes into view (foreshadowing later betrayals), Reeves displays a burnishing sincerity. Arms outstretched, he says, "Let's go to sleep,” and proceeds to cradle Mike.

The full-bodied listening Reeves exhibits in My Own Private Idaho is a hallmark of his work opposite women as well. Reeves is a great example of what Roswell New Mexico writer Alanna Bennett deemed The Look: "The number one thing a man in a romcom needs, TV or movie, is the ability to look at their love interest REALLY WELL. The man barely even needs to speak if he just knows how LOOK at a person.” Reeves has given that look in multiple contexts -- his face is bright with awe when he looks at Carrie-Anne Moss's Trinity in the Matrix films; it has a touch of admiration when he gazes at Sandra Bullock in Speed; and it is filled with unmitigated desire for Diane Keaton's Erica Barry in Something's Gotta Give.

Nancy Meyer's 2003 ode to beachside property and an older woman's sensual awakening stars Keaton as a successful playwright who finds herself falling for two very different men -- Harry Sanborn (Jack Nicholson), who briefly dated her daughter (how this didn't disqualify him immediately continues to baffle me) and has to go through a damn heart attack before he can see what's attractive in a woman around his own age; and Julian Mercer (Reeves), a sweet doctor with a penchant for black turtlenecks who is immediately smitten when they meet.

In the film, Reeves is attuned to the female gaze in its most literal incarnation -- an understanding of how women see the world, what they want from it, and how they make sense of desire. During a dinner scene with Julian, Erica's face and neck are flush. She's skittish and nervous in the face of his undeniable -- but never disrespectful -- sexual and romantic interest. Reeves's face shows the depth and breadth of The Look, as he glides from teasing lust to a spark of genuine intellectual attraction. At one point, when their conversations turns to women his own age, he says, "I've never met one I've reacted to" -- stumbling for a moment, as if shocked by the depth of his own feeling -- “… quite like this. When something happens to you that hasn't happened before, don't you have to at least find out what it is?” He's a man overcome and humbled by his own desire. Is there anything sexier? Then he leans in, his face going soft, gently kissing the groove where her neck meets her shoulder. "I knew you'd smell good,” he whispers. Only Reeves could pull off a line like that.

Many actors of Reeves's caliber are too invested in being in the spotlight of a scene to play a romantic lead like this. After the fall of the studio system in the 1960s, Hollywood no longer looked at women as a viable market, and while romantic comedies continued to get made, going forward, there was a notable shift in whose desire was centered -- and how little male actors seemed interested in exploring romance and desire. Reeves's willingness brought another layer of intimacy to his relationship with his audience, offering a more flexible, vulnerable portrait of masculinity that sets him apart from other name stars.

That intimacy is key to Reeves's longevity. It's what makes him such a great cinematic sensualist. In 2009, Matt Zoller Seitz argued that directors Michael Mann, Terrence Malick, David Lynch, Wong Kar-wai, and Hou Hsiao-hsien were the "the decade's best sensualists filmmakers.” He wrote, "They share a defining trait: a lyrical gift for showing life in the moment, for capturing experience as it happens and as we remember it. The sensualists are bored with dramatic housekeeping. They're interested in sensations and emotions, occurrences and memories of occurrences.” I'd argue that being a cinematic sensualist is a distinction that can apply to acting as well. For actors, it is about bringing texture and complication to a film, existing wholly in the moment, and a keen interest in the human body.

When we watch films, the body keeps score as much as the mind does. Reeves demonstrates an understanding of this. This is apparent in the delicate neck kiss in Something's Gotta Give; the careful way his hand skitters across broken glass before deciding on which shard to slit his wrists with in Constantine; the calm he engenders with merely the sound of his voice in Thumbsucker.

But it's most impactful in his career as an action star.In many ways, the John Wick franchise is the perfect marriage of director and star. The third film is a tactile feast. Consider a scene early in John Wick 3, in which Reeves methodically takes apart and reassembles a gun for a single shot. This scene is, of course, a testament to the character's skill as an assassin. But it also acts as a reminder of how out of step John is with the world around him, betraying a desire for the quieter moments in life -- despite the brutal milieu he finds himself in -- and a strange empathy for the world around him, whether it be object or animal. This allows a humanity to glitter throughout his performances that often feels absent from many action franchises that sacrifice character on the altar of plot.

There's another part of Reeves's star image I suspect has played into our abiding fascination with him. Until Always Be My Maybe, the most under-discussed part of Reeves's persona was his race. Late in his slim but potent book-length essay Mixed-Race Superman: Keanu, Obama, and Multicultural Experience, Will Harris astutely writes about a particular aspect of the 2005 film A Scanner Darkly that, metatextually, speaks to Reeves's whole career:

"To be mixed-race is to exist in a state of paradox. Race is an illusion that depends on purity and singleness. […] In A Scanner Darkly, set in a paranoid surveillance state in the near-future, Keanu plays a government agent called Bob Arctor, who because he works undercover, has to wear a 'scramble suit' in the office. The suit projecting 1.5 million constantly shifting representations of different people -- male and female, black, white, Latinx -- keeps his identity cloaked. Even the people he works with have no idea who he is.”

Like his persona, Reeves's face itself is considered unplaceable. Growing up, he never read as white to me, but he has read that way to Hollywood, which allowed his career to be mutable in ways that very few people of color ever experience. But for much of the moviegoing audience, seeing his face has always been a point of connection. It's the undercurrent of why his turn in Always Be My Maybe felt like such a significant moment in his career. It was as though something had been revealed about him for the first time, even though it had been present all along. That it was such a joyful, brazenly comedic role added yet another twist on his image. There was a sense that, even after 30 years in the spotlight, Reeves can still surprise us.



The Ladykillers

The Ladykillers is a 2004 American black comedy thriller film directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. The Coens' screenplay was based on the 1955 British Ealing comedy film of the same name, written by William Rose. The Coens produced the remake (their first), together with Tom Jacobson, Barry Sonnenfeld and Barry Josephson.

CAST:

Tom Hanks as Goldthwaite Higginson Dorr, Ph.D., the mastermind of the casino heist. He is the chatty Southern dandy who rents Mrs. Munson's apartment as a stage for the robbery. Dorr is very articulate, charming, and is somewhat pretentious. He is a recognizable parody of some of William Faulkner's characters and also bears some resemblance to Manly Pointer in Flannery O'Connor's Good Country People.

Irma P. Hall as Marva Munson, a well-meaning, God-fearing elderly widow. She shares her name with the judge in the previous Coen film Intolerable Cruelty.

Marlon Wayans as Gawain MacSam, the foul-mouthed, hotheaded janitor of the Bandit Queen Casino and the inside man.

J. K. Simmons as Garth Pancake, a garrulous demolitions expert who suffers from IBS. He has a female partner, Mountain Girl, whom he met at an "Irritable Bowel Singles" weekend.

Tzi Ma as "The General", the often silent owner of the Hi-Ho Donut store in the town. It is strongly implied that he gained his rank and experience tunneling for the Vietcong.

Ryan Hurst as Lump Hudson, the brawn of the group and a former football player who "is not very intelligent". He at first refers to Dorr as "Coach".

Diane Delano as Mountain Girl, Pancake's female partner and right hand gal. She wears braids and dresses in mountain clothing.

Reception
The film received mixed reviews, scoring a 56/100 average on Metacritic.[8] On Rotten Tomatoes, the film scored 55%.[9] The Rotten Tomatoes Critics Consensus said "Hanks' performance in the lead role is inspired, but this is a relatively minor offering from the Coen brothers."

SOUNDTRACK:

While Carter Burwell composed the film score for The Ladykillers, continuing his long-time collaboration with the Coen Brothers, much of the soundtrack is devoted to African American gospel music. The film's executive music producer was T Bone Burnett, who had previously worked with the Coens in sourcing soundtrack music for The Big Lebowski and O Brother, Where Art Thou?.

The soundtrack does not actually contain any pieces of Renaissance music. Similar to his work on O Brother, Burnett chose a mix of vintage songs by Blind Willie Johnson, The Soul Stirrers, Swan Silvertones and Bill Landford & The Landfordaires, along with recordings of contemporary black gospel artists, including Donnie McClurkin, Rose Stone, Bill Maxwell and church choirs, made especially for the film soundtrack. Hip hop songs by Nappy Roots and Little Brother are also featured.

The soundtrack was praised for helping to set the tone of the film, distance it from the 1955 original and complement the contemporary Southern United States setting and gospel music atmosphere.

V Trailer

V Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)










Alita: Battle Angel

Alita: Battle Angel | Official Trailer [HD] | 20th Century FOX

By the director of Titanic and Avatar, James Cameron and Jon Landaue










Lucy 2014

Lucy (2014) - Brain usage 10-20% - Cool/Epic Scenes [1080p]

Lucy - Trailer (Official - HD)

Wilford Brimley, homespun character actor, dies at 85, 8-2-20

Wilford Brimley, a Utah blacksmith and horse trainer who made a career transition to movies and commercials, often stealing scenes as gruff and homespun characters in films such as "Tender Mercies,” "The Natural" and "Cocoon,” died Aug. 1 at a hospital in St. George, Utah. He was 85.

He had been on dialysis and had several medical ailments, said his manager, Lynda Bensky.

After dropping out of high school to join the Marine Corps, Mr. Brimley was a bodyguard for reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes and a wrangler for ranches throughout the West. By the mid-1960s, he was working as a farrier shoeing horses for TV westerns, and he eventually was recruited for stunts.

"I became friends with a fella named Bob Duvall,” he told the Los Angeles Times, referring to the then up-and-coming character actor, whom he met on the set of "Cimarron Strip" in 1967 and who would go on to play celebrated roles in "The Godfather" and "Apocalypse Now.” "I met him on one of them horse opera TV deals. I was fascinated with what he was able to do as an actor. I'd never see anything like it.”

Not long after, Mr. Brimley shifted from stunts to acting on the advice of a colleague who told him that "it pays better and you don't have to hit the ground.”

With his burly physique, countrified drawl and overflowing mustache, Mr. Brimley looked every inch the prairie-roamer in Wild West oaters such as "True Grit" (1969) and "Lawman" (1971) and the drama "The Electric Horseman" (1979), starring Robert Redford as an over-the-hill rodeo rider.

He also had memorable supporting roles as a nuclear-plant worker in "The China Syndrome" (1979) opposite Jack Lemmon. And with his tinted wire-rimmed glasses, he excelled as plain-talking authority figures, including in "Brubaker" (1980) as a prison board member and in the journalism-legal thriller "Absence of Malice" (1981) as an assistant U.S. attorney general.

His career advanced to a new level in "Tender Mercies" (1983), in which he played a music manager forced to deliver hard truths about the business to Duvall's washed-up alcoholic country singer. The next year, Mr. Brimley played the cynical baseball manager Pop Fisher in "The Natural" opposite Redford, in the title role, and Duvall as a corrupt sportswriter.

Mr. Brimley's close friend Richard Farnsworth, who had a similar start in films as a stuntman, was also in "The Natural,” and their low-key chemistry made for a true-to-life scene in which each character tries to guess what song the other is whistling.

"We played name that tune for 25 years. It was not part of the script,” Mr. Brimley told the Powell (Wyo.) Tribune. "Not at all, not at all, we were just killing time.”

His biggest hit on-screen was "Cocoon" (1985), director Ron Howard's crowd-pleaser -- co-starring Maureen Stapleton, Don Ameche, Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn -- about retirement home residents rejuvenated through alien technology. Mr. Brimley had a touching farewell sequence while fishing with his grandson. "By golly,” he told the Salt Lake Tribune, with a rare flash of raw pride, "that turned out to be the best damn scene in the picture.”

He reprised his role in the sequel "Cocoon: The Return" (1988) and appeared in action films such as "The Firm" (1993), in which he played, against type, a secretive law firm's blackmailing security chief opposite Tom Cruise's hotshot lawyer. He was also cast in comedies including "My Fellow Americans" (1996) with James Garner and Lemmon as former presidents.

On TV, Mr. Brimley had a recurring role on"The Waltons" in the 1970s and then starred in the NBC drama series "Our House" from 1986 to 1988 as an ornery grandfather who takes in his widowed daughter-in-law and her three children. He also appeared on "Seinfeld" in 1997 as a rustic but menacing U.S. postmaster general who strong-arms Kramer into ending his boycott of mail delivery.

With an undisguised aversion to Hollywood, Mr. Brimley preferred to live on his properties in Santa Clara, Utah, and Greybull, Wyo., leaving occasionally to make a film or, in one of his favorite sidelines, to sing -- and sometimes record -- Tin Pan Alley standards with a jazz combo.

Mr. Brimley also became a TV fixture through his work as a folksy pitchman for Quaker Oats cereal and Liberty Medical, a mail-order provider of diabetes-testing supplies. Mr. Brimley suffered from the disease and said he spoke publicly about his condition because too many people "have diabetes, and they deny it. They think there's something to be ashamed about.”

His commercials invited parody, including a "Saturday Night Live" sketch featuring John Goodman as Mr. Brimley. In Goodman's sendup, Mr. Brimley fakes having diabetes (“I look like somebody who would have it”) and squirts a lot of Reddi-wip whipped cream into his mouth. He also detests oats (“It always seems like someone else ate it first”).

"You can either accept that or let it bother you,” Mr. Brimley said, with good humor, of the ribbing. "I accept it.”

Anthony Wilford Brimley, the son of a real estate broker and a piano teacher, was born in Salt Lake City on Sept. 27, 1934, and grew up in Santa Monica, Calif. He quit school in eighth grade and, after years of itinerant ranch work, went back to school, years later, in Salt Lake City.

"I was a terrible student,” he told the Salt Lake Tribune. "I just couldn't stand being cooped indoors. I tried to matriculate from the eighth grade to the 12th in one jump. It didn't work, so I dropped out again.” He served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War and was based in the Aleutian Islands.

His first wife, the former Lynne Bagley, died in 2000. In 2007, he married Beverly Berry, who survives along with three sons from his first marriage. Another son died in infancy.

After his encounter with Duvall, who remained a close friend for years, Mr. Brimley joined a Los Angeles theater group to train formally. "But the theater,” he told the Times, "turned into a big power struggle. They had committees and officials and I just said, 'Forget it. I don't want no more of it.’ ”

He experienced similar frustrations while making "The Waltons.” When the producer seemed to dismiss Mr. Brimley's concerns about his character, the actor asked to be written out of the series -- anticipating his plan to leave acting and go "back to the mountain.”

In a career that took many twists, Mr. Brimley returned to show business in 1977 after passing through Los Angeles while hauling horses to Denver. He decided to audition for a part in "The China Syndrome.” He joked that he did the audition mostly to get co-star Lemmon's autograph, but he grudgingly admitted to finding, in performance, a way to satisfy his wandering spirit.

"It's the greatest hiding place I know,” he told the Times. "I'm able to put those clothes on and use that name and those words and then tell the truth about myself.”

Actor Hume Cronyn Dies at 91, 6-17-20

Hume Cronyn, 91, a celebrated actor whose ornery style made him a splendid sparring partner with his actress wife, Jessica Tandy, died June 15 at his home in Fairfield, Conn. He had prostate cancer.

He appeared in more than 30 movies, earning an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor in one of his first roles, as a German who awakens to the dangers of fascism in "The Seventh Cross" (1944). He later brought his persnickety appeal to the attention of younger audiences in the 1980s films "Cocoon," as a retirement-home resident rejuvenated through alien technology, and "*batteries not included," where space visitors rescued him from eviction.

To many fans, he was all-but-inseparable from Tandy, to whom he was married from 1942 until her death in 1994. They became one of Broadway's leading husband-wife theatrical teams.

The couple appeared together in more than 10 shows, including such long-running, two-character plays as "The Fourposter" and "The Gin Game." Time magazine once described them as "the husband and wife who, working together and separately, define acting in America."

The couple toured in shows, playing many times in Washington, where in 1931 the Canadian-born Mr. Cronyn got his first professional role. Critics praised their chemistry -- he the crotchety soul, she the delicate and proper one -- for conveying enormous empathy, even in unlikable roles.

He liked to tell the story of a theatrical casting director who didn't know how to cast him. With a diminutive physique, dour expression and careful diction, he was not a Cary Grant or a John Barrymore, or a John Wayne for that matter. In short, the director said, he didn't "look like anything."

But Mr. Cronyn said that was an advantage later on in Hollywood, helping him avoid typecasting and leading to a considerable career as a character actor in films.

Among his memorable movie roles in the 1940s were the murder-plot enthusiast in Alfred Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt" and the radio operator in Hitchcock's "Lifeboat." He was a nimble lawyer in "The Postman Always Rings Twice," with John Garfield and Lana Turner as doomed killers, and a sadistic chief prison guard in "Brute Force" with inmate Burt Lancaster as his prey.

His later film work also included: "Sunrise at Campobello" (1960), as President Franklin D. Roosevelt's adviser Louis Howe; in "Cleopatra" (1963), as Sosigenes, a key aide to Elizabeth Taylor's Cleopatra; in "The Parallax View" (1974), as a skeptical newspaper editor, in a part he dubbed "Old Sausage Knees"; and in "Conrack" (1974) as a racist school superintendent.

Although his film work brought him broader recognition, Mr. Cronyn was known principally as an impeccable stage actor.

After receiving several Tony Award nominations, he won in 1964 for best supporting actor in John Gielgud's production of "Hamlet." He played the anxiety-ridden adviser Polonius to Richard Burton's Hamlet.

In 1994, the couple received dual Tony awards for lifetime achievement.

Mr. Cronyn grew up in London, Ontario. While studying corporate law at McGill University in Montreal, he found himself drawn to the university's drama classes and the local nightclubs. He later transferred to and graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York.

While in college, Mr. Cronyn traveled to Washington with a friend in 1931 and got a small role in the comedy "Up Pops the Devil" at the National Theatre. He said he over-rehearsed and blew his only line.

After graduation from the academy, he worked at the fledgling Barter Theatre in Abingdon, Va. His major break came in the 1935 national touring production of "Three Men on a Horse," the George Abbott farce. Abbott next cast Mr. Cronyn in "Boy Meets Girl" and "Room Service," which solidified the young actor's reputation.

Mr. Cronyn, divorced from his first wife, met Tandy at a play. He persuaded her to divorce British actor Jack Hawkins.

Mr. Cronyn and Tandy married and went to Hollywood.

In the late 1940s, he worked with Alfred Hitchcock to adapt two plays into films that became "Rope" and "Under Capricorn."

In 1951, he and Tandy started their two-year Broadway run of Jan De Hartog's "The Fourposter." The show's success prompted NBC to air in summer 1954 a sitcom with the couple called "The Marriage." Earlier they had done "The Marriage" on radio.

Mr. Cronyn alternated between television and theater roles in those years and received a Tony nomination as a gay art teacher in "Big Fish, Little Fish" (1961) with John Gielgud directing.

After playing Polonius in "Hamlet," Mr. Cronyn appeared in Edward Albee's "A Delicate Balance" (1966). He and Tandy played a suburban husband and wife who are forced to confront their own masked-over troubles when another couple shows up.

Mike Nichols directed the Cronyns in "The Gin Game," which ran 517 performances. When the play moved to Washington in 1979, James Lardner wrote in The Washington Post, "Cronyn's sturming and dranging, shaded with meek looks and subtle twitches, is the perfect match for Tandy's good-mannered gloom, concealing her own rival tempest of hurt."

Mr. Cronyn and his wife also starred in the hit "Foxfire" (1982), which was made into a television film in 1987. Mr. Cronyn co-wrote the Appalachian drama with Susan Cooper, who became his wife after Tandy's death.

Starting in the 1980s, he made several television appearances that earned him Emmy Awards in miniseries and specials. He won for lead actor in "Age-Old Friends" (1990), as best supporting actor as a grandfather in Neil Simon's "Broadway Bound" (1992) and best lead actor as a widower in "To Dance With the White Dog" (1993).

His other awards included a Kennedy Center Honor, the National Medal of Arts and election to the Theater Hall of Fame.

His first marriage, to Emily Woodruff, ended in divorce.

Survivors include his third wife; three children from his second marriage; two stepchildren; eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Married stage and screen actors Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy were honored with Lifetime Achievement Awards at the Tony Awards in 1994.

ADD:

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Photos: Oscars red carpet fashion 2021

The 30 Greatest Comedy Movies Of All-Time

28. Clueless (1995)


27. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987)


A funny and heartwarming comedy featuring two of the great comedic actors of all time in Steve Martin and the late John Candy. The late, great John Hughes wrote, produced and directed the film that puts a modern, traveled-themed twist on the ‘Odd Couple’ scenario. There are plenty of memorable moments and lines – “Those aren’t pillows” – from a film that still cracks up viewers to this day. The hilarious misadventures Neal (Martin) and Del (Candy) endure, allow the two to forge a bond that adds an endearing quality that makes it all the more better.

26. The 40-Year-Old-Virgin (2005)

23. Trading Places (1983)


People might forget that this John Landis’ classic was actually a Golden Globe nominee for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy shine in the lead roles as executive and poor street dweller, respectively. Unwittingly thrown into a nature-versus-nurture role reversal at the hands of the smarmy Duke brothers, the pair lead each other’s lives, drawing many laughs and good times that still makes for great comedy today. Ralph Bellamy (Randolph Duke) and Don Ameche (Mortimer Duke) as the incompetent brothers should also get their due for roles that many feel defined their stellar careers.

22. The Blues Brothers (1980)


A few years before John Landis gave us Trading Places, we were introduced to the Blues Brothers. Jake (John Belushi) and Elwood (Dan Aykroyd) don’t have much going for them, but they are on a mission from God to put their rhythm and blues band back together in order to play a show and save their old orphanage. The music is great, the lines unforgettable (“Orange whip, orange whip, orange whip.” “How much for the little girl?”) and we’re still wondering what the bill was for all those wrecked Chicago cop cars. Not to mention, the amount of legendary guest stars (Carrie Fisher, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin to name a few).

19. Coming to America (1988)


The John Landis hits just keep on rollin’. Coming to America featured Eddie Murphy, still at his comedic height, as the Prince of the fictional country known as Zamunda. He comes to America looking to live a common life in order to be ready to one day inherit the throne of his country. While Murphy is stellar, Arsenio Hall and John Amos are highly entertaining in supporting roles. We were also introduced to the soulful stylings of “Sexual Chocolate” and the wonders of “Soul Glo” hair products. The barber shop scenes with Murphy and Hall playing multiple roles are simply fantastic.

17. Duck Soup (1933)


The oldest film on this list, and usually considered the greatest comedic contribution from the legendary Marx Brothers. Though the film did not make a lot of money upon initial release and received some lukewarm reviews, it’s grown over time to become a classic of the genre. The plot can seem somewhat far-fetched (Groucho’s Firefly running a country and two of his brothers operating as spies), however, it was straightforward comedy and is worthy of lasting appreciation.

14. The Big Lebowski (1998)


Is there a cooler slacker than “The Dude?” Jeff Bridges is simply, and hilariously, perfect as the main character who is mistakenly caught up in a kidnapping ring. The Coen brothers are known for known for their edginess and creativity, but also their knack for creating memorable characters. Bridges’ Lebowski, who also happens to be a fantastic bowler, is one of the great comedic roles of all time. Bridges shines in just about every scene he’s featured.

11. The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988)


Baby Boomers and several Gen-Xers may remember the short-lived television series Police Squad (1982). That show and The Naked Gun, which turned into a franchise of three films, superbly used harmless slapstick fun and verbal puns to mock ’60s and ‘70s crime television shows. Leslie Nielsen is excellent as bumbling detective Frank Drebin, who is known to moonlight as a baseball umpire. The other two films in the series are serviceable, but this first installment is still side-splitting more than 30 years later.

9. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)


John Landis is at it again, this time with a rip-roaring script from Harold Ramis, Doug Kenney and Chris Miller. This riotous farse of fraternity life had parents across America frightened to send their children off to college in the late 1970s. It was arguably the late John Belushi’s shining moment as the heavy-drinking, under-educated “Bluto.” “Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?” That’s just one of the memorable lines from one of the funniest movies of all time. “Toga.”

8. Young Frankenstein (1974)


The first of two Mel Brooks’ gems that we’ll highlight. Starring such entertainment heavyweights such as Peter Boyle as “The Monster,” Gene Wilder (who co-wrote the screenplay with Brooks) as Dr. Frankenstein, Cloris Leachman and Teri Garr. The film takes a jab at the horror genre, but also did a solid job of paying homage to these types of films — which is evident through the use of black and white. The film became a cult classic that’s a regular on several all-time comedy lists.

6. Blazing Saddles (1974)


The great Mel Brooks has been responsible for some of the great comedy movies of all time. However, Blazing Saddles is considered to be the best of the bunch in many circles. With Sheriff Bart (Cleavon Little), “The Waco Kid” (Gene Wilder), Lili (Madeline Kahn) and, of course, Mongo (Alex Karras), this satirical comedy-western flick is full of consistent laughs. It also mocks a number of stereotypes associated with old-time westerns. The famous campfire scene is perhaps the most hysterical of all Brooks’ films.

5. Best in Show (2000)


No slight to Waiting for Guffman, A Mighty Wind or For Your Consideration. But, Best in Show remains of the gold standard among Christopher Guest’s mockumentary series of films. This one takes us into the world of a competitive dog show, and the insanity and hilarity is pretty much nonstop. Guest regulars Eugene Levy as the double left-footed Gerry Fleck and Catherine O’Hara as his “randy” wife Cookie, highlight a cast that also features memorable performances from Jane Lynch, Parker Posey and Fred Willard. Wonder if the dogs found themselves laughing at any point?

4. Caddyshack (1980)


If Slap Shot is the go-to hockey comedy, then Caddyshack is the same for golf fans. It was the late Harold Ramis’ directorial debut, and turned Bill Murray and Rodney Dangerfield into true film stars. Those two alone provide some of the funniest and most memorable moments of a movie that reportedly was as much fun for the actors to make as it was for those who have seen it. Those golfers who have never seen this film should have their clubs taken away.

2. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)


The famed British comedy troupe has provided some universal laughs over the years, but none more so than that of the Holy Grail. Its rousing take on King Arthur’s search for the Holy Grail is nothing but a good time. It’s also a film that has managed to consistently gain new fans over the last 40-plus years. Maybe because Graham Chapman’s Arthur is unforgettable. And, fellow Monty Python legends John Cleese as Sir Lancelot and Eric Idle, portraying Sir Robin, are also at their comedic best.

1. Airplane! (1980)


This was not an easy choice, but when all is said and done, Airplane! is one movie that stands up well as much in 2020 as it did 40 years ago. From the humorous minds of Jim Abrahams and brothers David and Jerry Zucker (Police Squad, The Naked Gun franchise) deliver that same slapstick comedy and timely gags, with quick edits and cuts, that became synonymous with their work. This movie spoofs disaster films, most notably Airport 1975. While some might call it easy, senseless humor, Airplane! provides nothing but good, harmless fun. Love that cameo from Los Angeles Lakers legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

The 30 Greatest Comedy Movies Of All-Time

The Top 30 Comedy Films Of All Time. imdb

1. Bridget Jones's Diary (2001)


Bridget Jones is determined to improve herself while she looks for love in a year in which she keeps a personal diary.

6. Hitch (I) (2005)


A smooth-talking man falls for a hardened columnist while helping a shy accountant woo a beautiful heiress. Will Smith.

18. The Princess Bride (1987)


While home sick in bed, a young boy's grandfather reads him the story of a farmboy-turned-pirate who encounters numerous obstacles, enemies and allies in his quest to be reunited with his true love.

20. Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993)


A spoof of Robin Hood in general, and Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991) in particular.

23. Airplane! (1980)


A man afraid to fly must ensure that a plane lands safely after the pilots become sick.

27. It's Complicated (2009)


When attending their son's college graduation, a couple reignite the spark in their relationship. But the complicated fact is they're divorced and he's remarried.

The 30 Best Comedy Movies of All Time. mentalfloss


1. The General (1926)


Buster Keaton's willingness to very nearly get himself killed over and over again for the sake of public entertainment is well-documented, and Keaton's particular brand of daring comedy never reached greater heights than with The General. Though its American Civil War setting is a regrettable part of the structure, the real star of the film is Keaton's repeated willingness to do some of the most elaborate, bold comedy stunts of the silent era. The film is worth watching for the moment in which he perches on the nose of a moving train and throws a railroad tie at another railroad tie to bounce it out of the way alone. Yes, he really did that, and yes, it's a gag that still works.

2. Duck Soup (1933)


The Marx Brothers weren't just a collective powerhouse. When they were at their best, they were four powerhouses operating independently of each other, and when joined together by the end of a film they were an unstoppable comedic force. Duck Soup is one among several Marx Brothers classics, but it stands out as the best of the bunch because it's perhaps the purest example of both their separate greatness and their unified talent. And of course, it's a film that makes plenty of room for the legendary honorary Marx, the great Margaret Dumont.

3. It Happened One Night (1934)


You can go as big as you want with your comedy movie, but sometimes the best formula for timeless joy is simply getting two very talented people, putting them together for 90 minutes, and letting them work their magic. That's what Frank Capra did with It Happened One Night, and the chemistry between Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert as two mismatched people on an unlikely adventure retains its timeless power even today. The movie is most famous for the moment when Colbert shows her ankles to get a ride, of course, but the dialogue is still packed with wit and even some occasional wisdom. Plus, few actors could play drunk as funny as Gable did.

4. Modern Times (1936)


Though the image of him as The Tramp is indelibly stamped on American pop culture, Charlie Chaplin was much more than the embodiment of that character. He was a genius of comedic structure both on macro and micro levels, able to perfect the timing of a devastatingly funny overall arc and the subtleties of a single comedic set piece. He made a lot of masterpieces, but Modern Times is arguably the one that still lands with the most profound impact today, even among later films like The Great Dictator. Chaplin's story of his Tramp working himself to the bone only to break down on the job and get swept into a strange saga of poverty, inequality, and comedy still works for a modern audience, which like the film itself is simultaneously sad and funny.

5. Bringing Up Baby (1938)


There's a case to be made that Cary Grant plays the greatest Straight Man in the history of big-screen comedy, and there's no better showcase of that than Howard Hawks's classic screwball comedy about a paleontologist, an heiress, and a leopard. This film has everything: Witty banter, music, jokes so deeply embedded you have to watch it half a dozen times to get them all, and of course a massive comedic set piece involving a collapsing dinosaur skeleton. Plus, in addition to Grant's remarkable performance as an in-over-his-head nerd, it's got Katharine Hepburn doing a version of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl thing way before that was cool, and she still makes it look good.

6. The Apartment (1960)


Billy Wilder made a lot of great comedies, and the American Film Institute went so far as to declare one of them, Some Like It Hot, to be the greatest American comedy film ever made. Though that film remains a comedy masterpiece, The Apartment does something it can't. Through a more subdued tone, beautiful performances, and an overwhelmingly big heart, Wilder's film about two lonely people finding their way to each other through twisted circumstances exudes a sense of warmth and honesty that persists six decades later, while also delivering the laughs.

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. M*A*S*H (1970)


Though it might be better known today simply for the sitcom it inspired, Robert Altman's M*A*S*H still stands a groundbreaking, gleefully irreverent masterpiece in its own right. Anchored by incredible, understated performances from Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould and driven by the now-famous naturalistic, constantly flowing dialogue, the film remains an intoxicating blend of high- and low-brow comedy, blending the zany with the profound, and the crude with the poignant, to create one of the great anti-war movies.

9. Blazing Saddles (1974)


Whenever Blazing Saddles comes up in conversation, someone always manages to remark that "you could never make that movie today," and that observation remains an extreme oversimplification of Mel Brooks's achievement with his classic Western satire. Yes, the jokes are dirty, transgressive, and in some cases haven't aged well, but "you couldn't make it today" ignores the larger point: You don't need to make it today. Blazing Saddles is still as blisteringly funny and relevant as it was when it was released, and that go-for-broke ending remains one of the gutsiest comedy moves of all time.

10. Young Frankenstein (1974)


~

You might notice that only one filmmaker, the great Mel Brooks, is given two films as a director on this list, and there's one simple reason for that: In 1974, Brooks had arguably the greatest year any comedy filmmaker has ever had. Blazing Saddles came out in February and became an instant classic, and then in December, Brooks released another all-time great laugh fest: The Universal Monsters send-up Young Frankenstein. Featuring Gene Wilder in full mad scientist mode, Madeline Kahn stealing every scene she's in, Marty Feldman delivering some of the best one-liners ever put to film, and so much more, Young Frankenstein is a brilliant, timeless film that showcases Brooks's skill as a visual artist almost as much as his skill as a humorist.

11. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)


You know a movie is good when the opening credits alone are making you laugh with jokes about moose bites. It wasn't necessarily a guarantee that the absurdist humor of Monty Python would translate from big-screen to small, but with Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the legendary comedy troupe proved that they could arguably make their brand of comedy work even better with a longer story in which to plan numerous running gags, side quests, and wacky characters. Plus, nearly 50 years after its release, Holy Grail remains one of the most quotable movies of all time.

12. The Jerk (1979)


Some roles are timeless things you can imagine a number of actors playing and nailing. Others are so specific, so informed by a particular comedic sensibility, that they can only come through one performer. No one but Steve Martin could have made Navin Johnson the character he is. No one but Steve Martin could have made an extended sequence of violence as funny by simply yelling "He hates these cans!" And, of course, no one but comedy legend Carl Reiner could have turned Martin's adorably hilarious and oblivious performance into the comic heartwarmer that The Jerk is.

13. Airplane! (1980)

Airplane! isn't the first film to play the "pick a genre and just do a straight-ahead spoof" card successfully, but it remains the standard against which all other films that apply its brand of rapid-fire, throw-spaghetti-at-the-wall humor are measured—and with good reason. There's a timeless purity to the zaniness of it, the sense that anything can and might as well happen for the sake of a joke. Even if the jokes that are dated to the time, like Barbara Billingsley speaking jive, still work in the context of the movie. Airplane! exists in its own hilarious little world, and it's a world that new viewers can still be welcomed into.

14. 9 to 5 (1980)


There's something about seeing Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Dolly Parton all on-screen together in 9 to 5 that basically just insists you love the movie, as it's impossible to not be charmed by the sheer star power of the three of them working together. Look past the glare of their collective glow, though, and you've still got an all-time great film that mixes elements of Golden Age screwball comedies with a very modern look at bureaucracy, office politics, unvarnished sexism, and the power of found sisterhood. And yeah, the song is still great.

15. Tootsie (1982)


So many things about Tootsie could have gone so wrong. The film could have been wildly tonally mismatched, too subtle, not subtle enough, or just plain offensive in its pursuit of a funny story about an egotistical actor literally and metaphorically getting in touch with his feminine side. In director Sydney Pollack's hands, though, the film becomes one of the all-time great American comedies, managing to poke fun at everything from oblivious sexism and gender roles to the strange egos of actors and writers. Dustin Hoffman remains terrific in the lead role, but the real scene-stealer is Charles Durning as a man in love with a woman he doesn't actually know very well.

16. Ghostbusters (1984)


~

Like Monty Python and the Holy Grail before it, Ghostbusters is a strong contender for the Most Quotable Movie ever made, packed with one-liners and strange non-sequiturs that still have us saying things like "That's a big Twinkie" and "Dogs and cats living together: Mass hysteria!" every day. It's been famously called a film about "nothing" because of the perceived way in which its characters don't really grow or change, and it's also been called a mockery of the perils of government regulation. However you perceive it, the fact that we're still talking about the meaning behind a movie in which guys in jumpsuits shoot sci-fi guns at a giant marshmallow monster is proof of its greatness. Ghostbusters is so unforgettably funny that we can't stop looking for the layers in it.

17. Lost in America (1985)


Albert Brooks's comedies are very specific, very hyper-focused films that say a lot about the time in which they were made while also remaining almost paradoxically timeless. They're all great, but Lost In America stands above the rest as perhaps Brooks's greatest statement on the kind of comedy he's most interested in. The story of a couple who set out to find themselves and only find that they're not really interested in growth, it's the kind of comedy that won't leave your brain for weeks after you've seen it. And though it was aimed at Reagan's America when it was made, it still has a point to make about the capitalist traps set for us even now.

18. The Princess Bride (1987)


Over the course of less than a decade, between 1984 and 1992, Rob Reiner had a nearly unparalleled run as director that included no less than three all-time comedy classics, including This Is Spinal Tap, When Harry Met Sally..., and this legendary fantasy adventure. The Princess Bride isn't necessarily funnier than those other two films, but it is funnier to a wider demographic than either of them. This is a movie that will have both kids and adults cackling at the top of their lungs at everything from sword fights to wordplay, and it features the single greatest comedic character in any of Reiner's films, full stop: Billy Crystal as Miracle Max.

19. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987)

20. Coming To America (1988)

21. Wayne's World (1992)

22. Groundhog Day (1993)

23. Friday (1995)

24. Clueless (1995)

25. Best In Show (2000)


After Rob Reiner proved it would work in This Is Spinal Tap, writer/director Christopher Guest decided to make much of the rest of his career about the joys of improvisational mockumentary filmmaking. The result is a handful of unforgettably funny movies, with Best In Show rising above the rest to become arguably the best mockumentary ever made. The cast is absolutely packed with comedic superstars, the format allows for endless playful forays into absurdity, and it all builds to a genuinely emotionally satisfying conclusion. Plus, it might be the only film that's ever wrung laughs out of simply listing different varieties of nuts.

26. Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004)

27. Shaun of the Dead (2004)

28. Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008)

29. Bridesmaids (2011)

30. Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping (2016)

The Washington Post: Life & Entertainment | This fascinating documentary looks at the L.A. nuns who stood up to the church’s male hierarchy




Bourdain

The controversy over Anthony Bourdain's deepfaked voice is a reminder that documentaries aren't journalism. By Ann Hornaday Movie critic July 19, 2021

Video--Morgan Neville / Director of Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain

Video--Full Documentary Movie 2021

Have documentaries evolved to the point where the very term "documentary" has lost all meaning?

Filmmaker Morgan Neville found himself at the center of controversy late last week when he admitted that he used artificial intelligence to simulate the voice of Anthony Bourdain in his latest documentary, "Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourdain," about the beloved cook, author and television personality who died three years ago.

The film, a conventional assemblage of archival footage, clips from Bourdain’s TV shows and present-day talking heads, primarily uses Bourdain as his own narrator by way of past interviews and audio books. In three instances, Neville said, he wanted to use material that Bourdain had written but not spoken. Using several hours of recordings, he contracted with a software company to generate a Bourdain-sounding voice "reading" those lines.

The idea that what we thought was Bourdain’s voice was, in fact, a deepfake elicited gasps among purists, as well as some of Bourdain's passionate fans, who expressed feelings of betrayal and even trauma at having their idol posthumously exploited. Although Neville insists that he had the permission of Bourdain's former wife and literary executor to make the AI recordings, Ottavia Bourdain issued a tart statement disavowing her cooperation: "I certainly was NOT the one who said Tony would be cool with that," she tweeted Friday.

ADD:

William Shatner, at 90, keeps seeking that next personal frontier. 8/20/21


Email comments to Professor Colby Glass, PhDc, MLIS, MAc at co@dadbyrn.com