China


China Tech: Interesting Bits and Pieces By Fred Reed [(born 1945 in Crumpler, West Virginia) is a writer and former technology columnist for The Washington Times.[1] He has also written for The American Conservative[2] and LewRockwell.com.[3] Additionally, he has spoken at one American Renaissance conference[4] and currently writes for Taki's Magazine.[5] A former Marine and Vietnam War veteran, Reed is a police writer and an occasional war correspondent. Reed writes weekly columns for the website Fred on Everything.] June 30, 2017 "Information Clearing House" - To one watching the advance of Chinese science and technology, or to me anyway, several things stand out. First, the headlong pace. Second, the amount of it that appears aimed at making China independent of the West technologically and getting the United States off Beijing’s back. Third, the apparent calculated focus. It looks like intelligent design, as distinct from America’s competitive scrabbling for profit by special interests, the hope being that this might inadvertently benefit the country as a whole.

As I have mentioned before, China came out of nowhere to become the world leader in supercomputers. Also in high-speed rail, of strategic importance in its plan to united Europe and Asia economically. Heavy investment in solar power offers to ameliorate its dependence on oil from the Persian Gulf, vulnerable to blockage by the US Navy. Then there is DF21D terminally guided ballistic missile, specifically intended as a carrier-killer in what China regards as its home waters. The list could go on at length.

In much of America, the Chinese are dismissed as being “unable to innovate,” inventiveness being thought of as unique to white men. Thinner ice has perhaps never been trod.

The Chinese are smart. They are certainly capable of high-grade engineering and scientific research. (Eg., Beijing Genomics Institute) The line between imaginative engineering and invention is blurry. Note that on the numbers China can potentially bring to bear five times as many engineers as America can and, while they are well short of this, twice as many would be–is?–the beginning of a new world.

While Beijing works to benefit China, rapidly increasing its techno-industrial clout, Washington spends insanely on weaponry. It is trying to apply a military solution to a commercial problem. America crumbles economically, politically, culturally, but has the very best bombers.

“China Just Took the Lead in the Quantum Space Race”

This being a big deal, I clip from Asia Times:

On Thursday, a team of Chinese scientists released findings from a breakthrough study that makes China the indisputable leader in the field of quantum communication, an achievement that could be of immense strategic importance.

The study, led by Pan Jianwei and published in Science magazine, successfully demonstrated the ability to distribute entangled photons across unprecedented distances, from space to earth, opening the door for the practical application of cutting-edge, ultra-secure communication.

The unprecedented distance was 1200 kilometers. Beijing might be regarded as trying to establish world-wide communications secure against NSA and, eventually, a whole internet proof against Fort Meade. Whether one regards this as engineering development or innovation doesn’t seem to make much difference.

China Is Building a ‘Forest City’ and It Looks Magical China is planning to build a “Forest City” with 40,000 trees and over 100 different species of plants to bring healthier fresh air to southern China.

Boeri plans for the city to host 30,000 people adjacent to Liuzhou, a city of 3 million that experiences unhealthy levels of smog and air pollution.

The new city, Liuzhou Forest City, would be nestled in the mountain region of Guangxi along the Liujiang river. One building in the forest city could counteract the greenhouse gas emissions of five cars


The World’s Largest Floating Solar Panel Farm Is Now in China The plant is estimated to be at least twice as large as the second biggest floating solar power plant, also in China, and sits on top of a man-made lake, which reduces any potential environmental impact... emerged a new leader in the battle to slow rising CO2 levels: China.


Are We in The Final Phase? By Peter Koenig [Peter Koenig is an economist and geopolitical analyst. He is also a former World Bank staff and worked extensively around the world in the fields of environment and water resources. He lectures at universities in the US, Europe and South America. He writes regularly for Global Research, ICH, RT, Sputnik, PressTV, The 4th Media (China), TeleSUR, The Vineyard of The Saker Blog, and other internet sites. He is the author of Implosion – An Economic Thriller about War, Environmental Destruction and Corporate Greed – fiction based on facts and on 30 years of World Bank experience around the globe.] June 27, 2017 "Information Clearing House"

There is hardly a day that goes by without a terror attack somewhere in the world, emphasis on western world... Terror is reigning in Africa every day, in Central Africa, the Congo, Burundi, Nigeria – you name it. The Islamic State is fighting in the Philippines [a proxy war for Washington].

Terror is fed, trained and armed by Washington and the Pentagon. The number of attacks are increasing by the day. We can only wonder, where will it strike tomorrow. The question, “when will it stop?” is not even an option. It will not stop. It’s part of the war game.

On the other side of the equation, globalized Wall Street, the FED and international financial institutions are strangling poor countries with debt into submission, especially those with natural resources, like hydrocarbons, tropical forests, gold and diamonds. All stained in blood.

But finance does not stop there. It comes down to the individual, digitizing cash. Making us a cashless society. It’s good for you. No need for carrying money around. It’s worthless anyway. Going digital, we can control you-and you are safe. The State will never steal your money. They could, but they won’t. Ethics. It’s called Ethics. And we trust them. In God We Trust – and god is money, to be precise – the US Dollar.

In the Middle East, a serious confrontation between the US and Russia is brewing, as Russia keeps believing in agreements signed with Washington, despite deceptions, time and again.

The US economy is based on war – and the European one is following closely in these bloody footsteps.

Those who control the economy are those who control the western monetary system, the fraudulent, privately made, owned usurping debt and interest machine; the dollar pyramid, upon which every other western currency depends. Those who control this unspeakable fraud, will eventually control a divided world. A world of man-made eternal chaos.

People, there is nothing left to hope for in the west. This could be it. The end-run. And you and me are in it, if we don’t leave it NOW. We have for too long believed in the treachery of Washington, the false promises, the eternal lies for centuries drop-by-dripping-drop into our brains have drained our self-worth, our autonomy

We are doomed. The west is doomed. The west is in its final stage of committing unrelenting suicide by sheer greed and monstrous aggressions and an eternal flood of lies. We are cooked. For good, beyond the threshold of no-return.

The only hope for those of us who may survive, is the East. China, Russia and the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) offer an economy of peace. They offer the world, including the west, for those who are not afraid to break loose from the weakening fangs of Washington, an enormous economic and scientific development program – the New Silk Road, or OBOR – One Belt One Road, or OBI for short. The One Belt Initiative – an economy of peace and prosperity offered to the world by China’s President Xi. Wake up, People, wake up – and step out from the western warmongers orbit.

Video: Documentary - Future of CHINA- China Documentary 2015

Video: China's Sexual Revolution - Documentary

Video: 1421 Chinese discover america before europeans

Paul Krugman: China's Leaders Have No Idea What They Are Doing China’s economic structure is built around the presumption of very rapid growth. Enterprises, many of them state-owned, hoard their earnings rather than return them to the public, which has stunted family incomes; at the same time, individual savings are high, in part because the social safety net is weak, so families accumulate cash just in case. As a result, Chinese spending is lopsided, with very high rates of investment but a very low share of consumer demand in gross domestic product.

What China needs are reforms that spread the purchasing power — and it has, to be fair, been making efforts in that direction. But by all accounts these efforts have fallen short. For example, it has introduced what is supposed to be a national health care system, but in practice many workers fall through the cracks.

Meanwhile, China’s leaders appear to be terrified — probably for political reasons — by the prospect of even a brief recession. So they’ve been pumping up demand by, in effect, force-feeding the system with credit, including fostering a stock market boom. Such measures can work for a while, and all might have been well if the big reforms were moving fast enough. But they aren’t, and the result is a bubble that wants to burst.

When China Rules When China rules, what will the world be like? Will Beijing govern as a global hegemon or be one among other great powers? Western capitals and their media often warn us about China’s rise, though hardly mention the dangers of the West's decline. When China rules, will the world be a safer place?CrossTalking with James Bradley, Martin McCauley, and Scott Kennedy.

"Relations between Japan and China have plunged to their lowest point in more than a decade after a weekend of violent anti-Japanese protests in Beijing and other cities.

"In the biggest demonstration in the Chinese capital since 1999 at least 5,000 people joined a rally last Saturday in support of a boycott of Japanese goods. They kicked Japanese cars and stoned the embassy...

""We must show the Japanese pigs how we feel," said a Mr. Liu, an IT engineer in his 30s...

Tokyo has demanded an apology, compensation and a promise that it would not happen again.

"The march was spurred by Japan's approval of a new history textbook that whitewashes its wartime atrocities, including the forced recruitment of thousands of sex slaves and biological weapons experiments on civilians" (Jonathan Watts. "Chinese Urge Japan Boycott." Guardian Weekly, April 15-21, 2005: 9).


"...an old-fashioned campaign to restore party discipline by President Hu Jintao, who has confounded hopes that he would be a Chinese Garbochev. Instead he has adopted a leadership style that appears to owe much to Mao Zedong.

"Over the next two years every party member will have to take part in re-education sessions for at least six months... the first time since the cultural revolution the lessons are compulsory for cadres of every level...

"...in economics Hu and his prime minister, Wen Jiabao, have pursued a "people first" policy of wealth redistribution that marks a shift from the "growth at all costs" priority of his market-oriented predecessor, Jiang Zemin...

"The manufacturing hubs of Guangdong and Zhejiang could once be sure of attracting peasant workers no matter how low the wages or how poor the conditions, but more farmers now can afford to stay at home and tend the land...

"Hu's government has been even tougher than its predecessor in restricting public freedom of expression...

"An undeclared war appears to be under way against dissident intellectuals. Reform advocates have been put under house arrest or sacked...

"...for now Beijing still looks like an old-fashioned dictatorship. "Huism" appears more nationalistic, centrally controlled and undemocratic than anything China has seen for two decades" (Jonathan Watts. "'New Mao' Turns His Back To the Future." Guardian Weekly, April 15-21, 2005: 10).


"China has opposed Japan's bid to become a permanent member of the UN security council, saying it is unfit for such leadership until it faces up to its past. In addition old animosities were rekindled after Japan's education ministry approved textbooks that critics say whitewash the history of Japanese aggression in the region...

"...anti-Japanese sentiment has soard in China and in South Korea...

"In March tensions between Tokyo and Seoul grew after Japan restated an old territorial claim to a group of small islands occupied by South Korea. The claim stoked bad feelings connected with Japan's occupation of the Korean peninsula from 1910 to 1945" (Anthony Faiola. "Japan suffers bombardment from cyberspace." Guardian Weekly, May 26, 2005: 22).


Acid rain on increse in China. More of China's cities are suffering from acid rain and its big rivers and lakes are heavily polluted, the government said in a report that highlighted the environmental costs of surging economic growth" ("The Roundup." Guardian Weekly, June 10, 2005: 2).


Beijing... behind the glitz there's growing disenchantment with relentless market reforms that have shrunk social services and thrown at least 20 million people out of work... the rallying cry of a group known as China's New Left...

"..the majority of New Left intellectuals are moderates who recognize that old Communist dogma lies discredited, and who simply want to rein in the excesses of China's market reforms. Their main complaint is that China's export-led growth strategy skews society and allows the fruits of reform to be harvested by urban residents and by government and Communist Party officials...

""This is now an unjust society," says Lu She Zhong... "Public anger over illegal demolitions, withheld pensions and corruption led to more than 50,000 protests in 2003, seven times the number from a decade before...

"President Hu Jintao and his team are tacitly supporting the New Left...

"New Left intellectuals are also challenging what Cui calls the growing "nexus between corrupt politicians, bankers and businessmen who in the name of reform are looting China...

"At the core of the New Left's policy recommendations is a focus on what they call the San Nong (or Three Nongs): issues concerning the plight of the Nong Min (peasants), Nong Ye (agriculture) and Nong Cun (rural communities)...

"Cui says that focusing on the San Nong will allow China to make the transition from an economy based on foreign direct investment to one based on organic growth and driven by domestic investment, which will raise local salaries and standards of living.

"New Left thinkers... leading the government to soften some of its earlier policies... Financial support to farmers has also increased, and now fewer migrate to cities looking for work as daily wage earners. That's shrinking China's pool of cheap labor and upsetting factory owners. But championing such causes and arguing in favor of development that is "less GDP-focused and more people-focused" is what the New Left sees as its immediate role, says Cui...

"President Hu, who took over from Jiang two years ago, has brought a different tone to decision-making in Beijing. His government has said it will look beyond GDP growth to address such issues as environmental decay, regional inequality and unemployment" (Jehangir S. Pocha. "China's New Left." The Nation, May 9, 2005: 22-24).


"China will bar new foreign television channels and step up censorship of imported programmes, the culture ministry announced, adding to efforts to tighten the government's control over popular culture...

"Beijing will also ban new licences for companies to import newspapers and magazines, electronic publications, audiovisual products and children's cartoons, the ministry said. New limits will be imposed on the number of foreign copyrighted products Chinese companies are allowed to publish...

"The measures are a step back from more liberal rules announced late last year to open China's media market" (Joe McDonald. "China bans new foreign channels." Guardian Weekly, Aug. 12, 2005: 9).


"Beijing bows to pressure from US but Asian exporters may reap greater benefit...

"China made its biggest monetary shift in more than a decade last week by revaluing the yuan and dropping the currency's peg to the dollar...

"In the short term the small scale of the revaluation--which took the dollar exchange rate down from 8.28 yuan to 8.11 yuan--will make little difference to global trade imbalances. The euro, by comparison, has risen 40% against the dollar in the past three years. But analysts said it was a breakthrough that would lead to a gradual appreciation of the Chinese currency--also known as the renminbi (RMB)" (Jonathan Watts. "China finally revalues yuan." Guardian Weekly, Aug.4, 2005: 25).


Colby Glass, MLIS