Heatstroke
Excerpts from magazine articles

"Ten minutes can change your life forever. That's all it takes for fatal heatstroke to take the life of your dog...

"[A dog's] single best method for eliminating body heat is through panting. And panting generates more body heat...

"...This evaporative cooling effect lowers the body temperature--sometimes. If the inspired air is so high humidity already, the evaporation of moisture from respiratory tract surfaces simply does not occur.

"Even on mild days, heatstroke can quickly overcome dogs in a car...

"On hot or humid days, be very cautious about leaving your dog in an enclosed area, even in the shade. Avoid taking your dog to such summer activities as outdoor flea markets, fairs, parades, and carnivals. Have ready access to water and watch for signs that heat is building up in your dog. Once body temperature begins to climb, heatstroke is only minutes away"(Dunn Jr., T.J. "Heatstroke: A Preventable Tragedy." Dog World, June 2003, p.24).

"Symptoms of heat stroke include sudden onset of vomiting or diarrhea, difficulty breathing, brick-red gums, a rectal temperature over 104 degrees (normal is 101 to 102 1/2], depression, grogginess, seizures, collapse, and coma.

"If you think your dog might have heat stroke, quickly get her out of the sun and into a shady, cool spot. Mist skin with cool water from a hose or spray bottle, or place wet towels around her neck, chest, and limbs. If possible, place your dog in front of a fan for an evaporative effect. Never immerse an overheated dog in cold water; this actually increases core body temperature. Do not allow your dog to guzzle large volumes of cold water. This will trigger vomiting. If your dog doesn't vomit, frequently offer only small quantities of water or ice chips. Seek veterinary care immediately even if your dog improves. Hyperthermia can damage vital organs, including the brain and kidneys, and requires prompt, aggressive medical therapy...

"Avoid walking your dog in the middle of the day. Hot pavement, sidewalks, sand, and rocks burn and blister foot pads...

"Prevent access to toxins on freshly fertilized lawns or landscaped areas treated with pesticides and herbicides...

"Check your car frequently for radiator fluid leaks; tiny amounts of sweet-tasting antifreeze can kill a dog" (Bertram, Susan. "Sunshine Safety." Dog Fancy, June 2003, pp. 18-19).


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