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Slavehood 2017 By Peter Koenig [an economist and geopolitical analyst. He is also a former World Bank staff and worked extensively around the world in the fields of environment and water resources. He lectures at universities in the US, Europe and South America.] May 04, 2017 "Information Clearing House"

When in the 18th and 19th Century African slaves did not ‘behave’, they were cruelly beaten sometimes to death as a deterrent for others. They were deprived of food for their families. Their women were raped. They were traded to even harsher white masters. Their lives were worth only what their labor could produce. They were treated as subjects, devoid of human warmth.

Today we have become all slaves; slaves to the powers of mafia bankster of finance; slaves to the western lie-propaganda; to the lobbies and their giant all dominating corporations – to the war-industry, because we happily believe what we are told about ever-increasing terrorism that needs to be fought with eternal wars; slaves to the environment-destructive hydrocarbon industry; to the pharma-industry; to the Monsanto-ized agroindustry; to senseless consumerism – and foremost – and summing it all up: to greed, endless greed that drives endless growth, nurturing endless competition fomenting adversity, destroying solidarity, instead of amical cooperation for a harmonious human cohabitation.


As people of western nations, we are enslaved to an all-engulfing neoliberal fascism – to a predatory economy. Corporate lie propaganda drip-feds our brains. We haven’t even noticed it. We are enslaved to so-called ‘leaders’, put in office by obscure foreign masters of deceit – the ever-stronger corporate controlled propaganda machine – the six all controlling Zion-Anglo media, whom we believe whatever lie they vomit – because it is more comfortable to believe a lie than to confront the truth – that’s self-imposed slavehood.

That’s how far we have gone. Because we are clearly on an almost irreversible downward track – sliding and running towards our own demise – into darkness – the darkness of chaos and bloody wars, endless wars against self-invented terrorism; wars that keeps our western economy running – and our armchair politics alive. Wars that kill and slaughter millions and millions – but all in ‘far-away’ lands. We are told we are protected. Our police and military watch over us. The new gods – money and military.

Although ‘pride’ was never an appropriate term to integrate our soul and minds, as we the western powers – have for centuries enslaved, raped, exploited and slaughtered the indigenous people, those who have for millennia, for history of mankind survived and passed on our human genes from one murderous civilization to another, always in the hope that the new one would see the light.

We can only hope that the patience of these native people, the survivors, our saviors – will prevail, that before we disappear in darkness, in the void of a manmade blackhole, we will awake, open our eyes and seek the light – become finally human, the term we have fraudulently applied to ourselves – the western civilization.

Independent thinking has become a crime, as it impedes the advancement of slavehood. Education is designed to kill individual thinking and the wide range of inventiveness – because it’s dangerous – for those who enslave and control us. ‘New-speak’ education has to make us thinking what the system wants us to think. That’s what western education has become in the last 50 years – a farce to keep us as non-thinking idiots.

Idiots are easily enslaved and exploited and sent to wars – to steal foreign resources to satisfy the greed of a few. We love to be cannon fodder, as we were told – enslaved – to believe that good patriots love to die for their country. We are blinded and avoid seeing that we are dying fighting to satisfy puppet leaders’ greed for power and money – whose power is nothing more than that allowed them by the Masters who control the world and who pull the strings on their marionettes.

"Citgo... provides heating oil to poor and working-class Americans at a 40 percent discount... This winter, Citizens Energy and Citgo expect to deliver more than 100 million gallons of oil to more than 400,000 households in sixteen states, more than doubling the scope of last year's petro-philanthropy. Beneficiaries also include 163 American Indian tribes, most of them in Alaska...

"By showing that the richest nation on earth requires foreign "assistance" to meet its citizens' basic needs, Venezuela reveals our most profound failure as a system" (Liza Featherstone. "Chavez's Citizen Diplomacy." The Nation, Jan. 1, 2007: 22-24).

Pick your Poison Grading the oil companies, pro and con
Exxon Hates Your Children the satire video
Exxon Hates Your Children info. behind the ad
Exxon Hates Your Children sign the petition---The time is now to stop fueling climate disaster on US taxpayers’ dime. We demand Congress and the President work together to eliminate ALL subsidies to fossil fuels. We, and our children, cannot afford the more than $10 billion per year in handouts from the US government to Big Oil, Gas and Coal.



Quotes

"I don't know if the battles we are fighting are primarily motivated by the quest for oil, for land, for religion or for high moral ground. But oil is surely implicated to some degree, and our dependence on it ought not to remain a driving force behind our social policy, our morality, our wars. Releasing ourselves from this dependence is worth the effort, even if it will require a massive re-ordering of the way we conduct our lives; even if it will require a massive infusion of resources into the technologies of renewable energy; even if it will require a generation of enhanced public education and science training. This won't be easy, but it is certainly more attainable and less flammable a proposition, less corrosive of our global standing and global order, than setting a match to the Middle East, Africa, and broad swaths of Asia in the pursuit of more pipelines" (Patricia J. Williams. "All Creatures Great and Small." The Nation, Oct. 4, 2004: 9).


"Shortly after the 1973 Arab oil embargo sent oil prices soaring, Richard Nixon declared his plan for American "Energy independence." Nixon told the American people, "Let this be our national goal: At the end of this decade, in the year 1980, the United States will not be dependent on any other country for the energy we need to provide our jobs, to heat our homes, and to keep our transportation moving."

"When Nixon made that pronouncement, the U.S. imported about six million barrels of oil per day. Today, the U.S. is importing nearly twice that much oil. Imports from the Persian Gulf have nearly tripled. Overall oil consumption in America has jumped by 25 percent since 1973...

"The Saudies provide nearly 70 percent of the oil being imported by the U.S. from the Persian Gulf. Nearly 22 percent of all the 20 million barrels of crude oil consumed in America now comes from the Persian Gulf...

"The unfortunate truths about America's energy addiction are these: America's energy policy and its foreign policy have merged; and neither the U.S. nor any other country that consumes large amounts of energy will be independent of Arabian crude anytime over the next 50 years or so...

"...to reduce the amount of oil it imports from Arab countries that support terrorism... here's the key -- that effort will take decades of work and hundreds of billions of dollars in new investment. Unless or until those investments are made, the U.S. will continue to depend on the Saudis to maintain stability in the world oil market...

"...by depending on Arab states -- many of whom fund terrorism -- to fill our gas tanks, America dooms itself to fail in the war on terrorism" (Robert Bryce. "Kerry's Low-Watt Energy Policy." Texas Observer, 9/24/04: 12, 28).


"On February 24, the New York Times reported that top US energy analysts now believe that Saudi Arabia--the world's number-one producer--is facing the wholesale depletion of its major oilfields and may not be able to sustain its current output of 10 million barrels per day (mbd) much beyond the current decade. Were Saudi production to fall below 10 mbd for any length of time, the global energy system would simply collapse, as no other country can make up the difference on a sustained basis. But even if the Saudis do maintain this level, but fail to rise above it, the global economy will still suffer, since there is no way to satisfy rapidly growing world demand without a substantial increase in Saudi output... the entire world will face an acute energy crisis...

"...directed fresh attention to claims that the world is approaching the moment of maximum or "peak" oil output, beyond which no amount of drilling or investment will result in higher levels of production...

"...experts believe that global peak production--sometimes called "Hubbert's Peak"--will occur sometime during this decade. The intensive development of deep-offshore oil, polar supplies and "unconventional" sources (such as tar sands and shale oil) may extend the peak for another decade... but world oil production will eventually slacken and then turn relentlessly downward... (see Peak Oil)...

"Unless affordable substitutes are developed, a decline in global oil output will produce rising transportation costs, diminished economic activity, high inflation and the onset of a deep and prolonged world-wide depression. Furthermore, because modern, mechanized agriculture is wholly dependent on cheap oil--for herbicides, and pesticides, as well as truck and tractor fuel--a contraction of petroleum supplies will result in reduced food production and in all likelihood, mass human starvation...

"...we are in for extreme trauma and difficulty. While it is conceivable that hydrogen will prove the fuel of choice... it is unlikely that the required infrastructure... will be in place by 2015 or 2020, when global oil production may begin its irreversible descent. In that eventuality, we will have to undergo several decades of punishing scarcity until a new energy regime has been put in place. Worldwide economic activity will contract during this period, billions of people will starve or suffer, and the major industrial powers will engage in ceaseless "resource wars" over any remaining pools of petroleum...

"...five recent books on the future of petroleum: David Goodstein's Out of Gas, Richard Heinberg's The Party's Over, Paul Roberts's The End of Oil, Sonia Shah's Crude: The Story of Oil, and Matthew Yeomans's Oil: Anatomy of an Industry. These compelling and provocative books address disparate aspects of the larger problem, but all arrive at the same chilling conclusions:

--"Peak oil is already here, or will arrive soon...

--"The production of deep-sea and Siberian oil and the development of unconventional sources of supply will prove too costly, too risky...

--"Hydrogen and renewables... their development is proceeding far too slowly to substitute for disappearing oil during the next few decades...

--"Continued reliance on petroleum and other fossil fuels (coal, natural gas) for the majority of our energy supply--90 percent, in the case of the United States--will intensify the buildup of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, thus hastening the onset of relentless droughts, heat waves, sea-level surges and other cataclysmic climate changes...

--"America's political leaders, like those of most other countries, are far too committed to the industrial status quo...

--"...If we start now on the transition to hydrogen and other substitutes, we have a fighting chance of averting total economic collapse when oil begins to disappear...

"...a critical lesson: "The crisis will come not when we pump the last drop of oil but rather when the rate at which oil can be pumped out of the ground starts to diminish." And that critical point, he warns, is much closer than we previously imagined.

"...other sources of energy, including coal, natural gas, hydrogen, solar, wind, and nuclear... none, at current levels of development, are capable of sustaining the energy-intensive life we have become accustomed to...

"...deep-seated pathologies of the global oil industry. Rather than exercise enlightened stewardship over a precious and finite resource, the oil companies have sought to maximize its exploitation for short-term profit--often trampling upon indigenous communities, fragile ecological areas and democratic systems in the process...

"...Richard Heinberg... argues that the rapid development and exploitation of petroleum has created a bubble economy that is sure to burst once the moment of peak production has passed... "Industrial societies have been flourishing for roughly 150 years now, using fossil energy resources to build far-flung trade empires, to fuel the invention of spectacular new technologies, and to fund a way of life that is opulent and fast-paced...

"Unlike Roberts, Heinberg has little faith that the development of hydrogen, natural gas and other "bridging" technologies can spare us from a painful economic contraction. All these approaches, he suggests, depend on the perpetuation of a high-cost, energy-intensive industrial leviathan that will not survive the disappearance of cheap oil. What is needed, he insists, is not so much technological innovation as profound life-style adjustments... This will not be an ongoing "party" of the sort that most Americans now enjoy, but it will provide some attractions of its own--particularly in terms of greater community sharing and participation" (Michael T. Klare. "Crude Awakening." The Nation, Nov. 8, 2004: 35-41).


"By design or circumstance, the Pentagon's "war on terrorism" seems to follow the investments of major U.S. oil companies around the globe. Iraq dominates the headlines now; two years ago it was Afghanistan. But the same pattern also reaches from South American to Africa's Sahel, from the jungles of Southeast Asia to the high deserts of Central Asia. U.S. military operations have escalated dramatically in all these regions since the 9/11 attacks. And while the intended targets may be "terrorist networks" linked to al-Qaeda, indigenous people resisting the industrial pillagge of their lands more often bear the brunt of the militarization.

COLOMBIA

"The ongoing war in Colombia--recognized by the United Nations as the world's greatest humanitarian disaster after congo and Darfur--has largely been pushed from the headlines by the crisis in Iraq. But Congress and the Pentagon are paying close attention to this oil-rich South American nation.

"At the close of October, Congress approved doubleing the Pentagon's troop presence in Colombia to 800 and raised the cap on the number of U.S. civilian contract agents--pilots, intelligence analysts, security personnel--from 400 to 600. The little-noticed measure came as part of the 2005 Department of Defense authorization act and was a defeat for human rights groups, which had been pushing for a lower cap. The new 800/600 cap is exactly what the White House asked for.

"The vote was closely followed by a national wave of protest throughout the war-torn South American nation, as some 1.4 million public-sector workers walked off their jobs and took to the streets for a one-day strike. Organized by major trade unions as well as civil organizations, the October 12 strike demanded an end both to President Alvaro Uribe's push to join George W. Bush's Free Trade Area of the Americas and to the rights abuses and atrocities associated with the government's counter-guerrilla war--which the United States has funded to the tune of $3.3 billion since Plan Colombia was passed in 2000.

"The Bush administration has expanded the "Plan Colombia" program... also includes military aid packages for Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia...

ECUADOR

"Oxy is also building a new pipeline over the Andes to get oil from Ecuador's Amazon rainforest to Pacific ports. Charging land grabs and pollution, local Indians, peasants and ecologists have repeatedly blockaded construction on the pipeline route with their bodies. Their protests have been violently broken up by security forces. In June 2002, the entire region was immobilized by a general strike protesting the pipeline. The U.S. military is currently expanding the airfield at Manta, Ecuador, near where the pipeline is slated to meet the sea, ostensibly as a staging ground for surveillance operations in the Colombia war.

PERU

"In Peru, Hunt Oil and Halliburton... have launched a massive natural gas project at Camisea in the Amazon rainforest. The gas is to be piped over the Andes to the Pacific and exported to energy-hungry California. Last year, local peasants blocked roads leading to the Camisea site for weeks, in protest of the project's ecological impacts. In October 2003, the blockades were violently broken by Peruvian National Police troops using helicopters and tear gas.

BOLIVIA

"Bolivia was rocked by a wave of unrest now known as "Black October" or "the Gas War." At issue was President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada's approval of a plan by a consortium led by Sempra Energy of California and including Shell Oil to build a pipeline linking Bolivia's natural gas fields to a terminal on the Chilean coast for export to California. The security forces responded to peasant roadblocks with violence, leaving at least 80 dead--and international fears of a coup d'etat--before Sanchez de Lozada fled to Miami on October 17. His vice president, Carlos Mesa, assumed power and pledged to hold a popular referendum on the pipeline project. Sanchez de Lozada now faces charges in Bolivia of murder, human rights violations and genocide.

"...peasants and Indians have continued to protest and periodically block roads and gas installations with their bodies to press the issue... Bolivia's internal gas pipeline network has been partially privatized to none other than Enron, the failed Texas energy giant...

AFRICA

"...few have noticed that the Pentagon has established a presence just across the border in Chad--not to respond to the genocide but to chase "terrorist networks." Soldiers from the U.S. Army's 10th Special Forces Group are also training troops in Mali, Mauritania, and Niger under the program, aimed at halting infiltration...

"The new U.S. military presence comes just as ExxonMobil has targeted Chad for a major new thrust of oil development. New oilfields have opened in Chad's Doha Basin, and a World Bank-funded 600-mile pipeline was completed in 2003, linking Chad to the Atlantic and Western oil markets.

SOUTHEAST ASIA

"U.S. troops have already been involved in fighting with Islamic guerrillas in the Philippines. Now Bush is seeking to re-establish military aid to Indonesia, suspended due to human rights violations in 1999.

"Exxon faces litigation in U.S. courts for grave human rights violations carried out in the conflicted Indonesian province of Aceh by Indonesian military forces in the company's direct pay for "protection" of its oil facilities. The White House now warns that al-Qaeda is seeking links to Aceh's separatist guerrillas. But the Aceh separatists--who say they have actually resisted al-Qaeda's designs in the region--want their independence precisely because Jakarta allows the breakneck corporate exploitation of their land...

"Unocal has also announced interest in developing new offshore gas finds in the Philippines--where U.S. military involvement is rapidly escalating. Unocal's interest is off Mindoro Island, while U.S. forces have already been in combat with the (supposedly al-Qaeda-linked) guerrillas of Abu Sayyaf in Mindanao, the major Muslim-majority island just 200 miles south.

CENTRAL ASIA

"After Afghanistan, the largest U.S. troop presence in Central Asia is Uzbekistan... then Azerbaijan and Turkey" (Bill Weinberg. "Forgotten Oil Wars of the "War on Terrorism."" Nonviolent Activist, Winter 2005: 6-8).


"Herold is the first Wall Street firm to predict when specific energy companies will hit their peaks...

"Herold expects 2008 to be critical, with Exxon Mobil Corp., ConocoPhillips Co., BP, Royal Dutch/Shell Group and the Italian producer, Eni S.p.A., all hitting their peaks. In 2009, Herold expects ChevronTexaco Corp. to peak. In Herold's view, each of the world's seven largest publicly traded oil companies will begin seeing production declines within the next 48 months or so" (Robert Bryce. "Running On Empty." Progressive Populist, April 15, 2005: 1).


"... the EU also enjoys a greater share of global trade... if Europe's two key oil producers, Norway and the UK, wer to adopt the euro--which is likely--this might create a momentum to shift the oil pricing system to euros. If that were to happen, oil-importing nations aroung the world would no longer need dollar reserves to purchase oil, and the demand for dollars could decline significantly" (Jeremy Rifkin. The European Dream p. 64)...


"...rather than having been a boon, oil has been a curse for Nigeria, just as it has for many developing nations. The hundreds of billions of dollars that should have gushed from the ground into the government's accounts have been diverted or wasted. Nigeria, with Africa's largest population of more than 130 million citizens, remains one of its poorest. Despite its oil windfall, it has managed to amass more than $34bn in overseas debt. And it is ineligible for debt relief under the Highly Indebted Poor Countries programme --thanks again to its oil...

Nigeria is "the most corrupt country in the world" ("Curing Oil's Curse." Guardian Weekly, May 12, 2005: 3).


"Expert warns that price may soar to $100 a barrel and spark economic collapse...

"One of the world's leading energy analysts called this week for an independent assessment of global oil reserves because he believes that Middle Easter countries may have far less than officially stated and that oil prices could double to more than $100 a barrel within three years, triggering economic collapse...

""There is a big chance that Saudi Arabia actually peaked production in 1981. We have no reliable data. Our data collection system for oil is rubbish. I suspect that if we had, we would find that we are over-producing in most of our major fields...

"Mr. Simmons told the meeting that it was inevitable that the price of oil would soar above $100 as supplies failed to meet demand...

"...other oil analysts argued strongly that a major financial crisis could occur as soon as 2008" (John Vidal. "Coming Oil Crisis Feared." Guardian Weekly, April 29, 2005: 1).


"...the second great depression may be around the corner...

"..."Oil and gas dominate our lives, and their decline will change the world in radical and unpredictable ways," he says...

"...the overall oil peak arrives next year...

"If he is correct, then global oil production can be expected to decline steadily at about 2-3% a year, the cost of everything from travel, heating, agriculture, trade, and anything made of plastic rises. And the scramble to control oil resources intensifies. As one US analyst said recently: "Just kiss your lifestyle goodbye"...

"...the much more optimistic official figures... that peak production will not come for about 30 years" ("The Beginning of the End." Guardian Weekly, April 29, 2005: 15-16).


"A $4bn pipeline that will deliver a million barrels of crude oil a day to the Mediterranean Sea and is set to become a vital gateway for central Asian energy resources to the West, opened last week.

"The Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) pipeline will run for 1,750km from the Axerbaijani capital, through Georgia to the Turkish port, and through two of the most politically turbulent countries in the region.

"Washington, uncomfortable at its reliance on oil from the Middle East, has long sought the BTC as a bridge for the massive energy resources of Kazakhstan, a country the size of western Europe.

"The pipeline has stoked controversy on several fronts.

"Apart from the environmental hazards (it passes close to a national park in Georgia and traverses highly seismic landscape throughout its route), the pipeline has brought western powers into partnership with governments with suspect human rights records" (Nick Paton Walsh. "Caspian pipeline opens oil route to West." Guardian Weekly, June 3, 2005: 12).


"Brazil imports 3% of its energy needs. The United States imports more than 40%. About 40% of Brazil's energy is supplied by ethanol. About 3% of the US energy needs are filled by ethanol. It's an interesting juxtaposition. Another interesting fact: No Brazilian soldier has died in Kuwait or Iraq or any other conflict-plagued oil state. Brazil does not suck up to Saudi Arabian royal despots...

"During the oil crisis of the 1970s (which never really ended, obviously) Brazil decided it would not be held hostage to Middle Eastern terrorists and oil cartels. So it decided to wean itself, and has succeeded.

"The Los Angeles Times published a tremendous story on the topic June 15. Almost all the cars in Brazil are flex-fuel; that is, they all can run on 85% ethanol. The result: E85 is sold everywhere. It is sold for about half the price of regular unleaded gasoline.

"Why not the US?...

"Of course, increased ethanol production would be a short-term boon to Iowa, the national leader in ethanol. But corn isn't the only stuff from which ethanol can be made. Brazil uses sugar cane. Technology is emerging in producing energy from cellulose such as corn stover or switchgrass. Ethanol can be made anywhere in the US.

"The critics say that ethanol receives inordinate government subsidy. Harkin points out that the true cost of gasoline, including direct subsidies and the cost of defending the Persian Gulf, is about $7 per gallon...

"Eventually the private sector will embrace renewable fuels if government primes the pump. The LA Times reports about Brazil: "Private investors are channeling billions of dollars into sugar and ethanol production, creating much-needed jobs in the countryside. Environmentalists support the expansion of this clean, renewable fuel that has helped improve air quality in Brazil's cities. Consumers are tickled to have a choice at the filling station."...

"Ethanol is not about helping corn growers or saving the environment. Ethanol is about getting off the oil jones and getting our foreign policy free of Middle East entanglements. So long as we depend on sheiks for the fuel that drives the United States, we will watch soldiers die for the politics of Big Oil" (Art Cullen. "Brazil has it figured out." Progressive Populist, July 15, 2005: 17).


"The practical failure is to see nuclear power as a magic bullet. Where it exists, nuclear has only been possible through enormous sublic subsidies...

"Peak oil is likely to be the point of diminishing returns for the entire big-economy, growth-at-all-costs, free-trade, globalised model of capitalism. Factor in the 75% drop in oil production and the current strategies for production, distribution, transport and town planning don't look so clever.

"As energy prices soar, it will seem ludicrous to cart goods halfway round the world. Countries that do not have their own local supplies will have to pay through the nose. Protectionism will cease to be a dirty word and localization will be all the rage" (Larry Elliott. "Oil has the world over a barrel." Guardian Weekly, July 1, 2005: 27).


"The energy bill just passed by the House... [contains] nothing that needs to be done about energy. The bill give $8.1 billion in new tax breaks to the oil companies, which are already swimming in cash.

"ExxonMobil's profits are up 44%, Royal Dutch/Shell up 42%, etc. According to the business pages, the biggest problem oil executives face is what to do with all their cash. So why give more tax breaks to the oil companies?" (Molly Ivins. "Energy policy so stupid, it's painful." Progressive Populist, June 1, 2005: 22).


"Next year, the administration will phase out the $2,000 tax credit for buying a hybrid vehicle, which gets over 50 miles per gallon, but will leave in place the $25,000 tax write-off for a Hummer, which gets 8 mpg. That's truly crazy, and that's truly what the whole Cheney energy policy is...

"Meanwhile, what we are sticking with is soaring oil prices (ExxonMobil just reported the highest quarterly profit ever, $8.42 billion, by an American company)...

"Nor are the major oil companies spending their mammoth profits on exploration or field development--they're doing mega-mergers and stock buybacks... The Chinese and the Indians are now buying cars like mad, and the result is going to be an enormous supply crunch, sooner rather than later...

"Conservation is simply the cheapest and most effective way of addressing this problem. If you put a tax on carbon, it would move industry to wind or solar power. Wind power here in Texas is at the tipping point now--comparably priced. Our health, our environment, our economy and the globe itself would all benefit from a transition to renewable energy sources.

"And as Tom Friedman recently pointed out, it would do a lot for world peace, too: "By doing nothing to lower US oil consumption, we are financing both sides in the war on terrorism and strengthening the worst governments in the world. That is, we are financing the US military with our tax dollars and we are financing the jihadists--and the Saudi, Sudanese and Iranian mosques and charities that support them--through our gasoline purchases"" (Molly Ivins. "Dumb, Dumber, and Dumbest." Texas Observer, April 15, 2005: 14).


"Over the course of about twenty years, Texaco dumped some 18 billion gallons of oil and toxic waste into Ecuador's lakes and streams, contaminating groundwater, rivers and fisheries and causing hundreds of Ecuadorians to die of strange cancers, according to the plaintiffs. Their lawyers and scientific experts insist it's the worst oil-related contamination in the world today--thirty times larger than the Exxon Valdez spill" (Daphne Eviatar. "The high cost of oil." The Nation, Aug. 8, 2005: 28).


"Gas companies, wallowing in record profits, took the occasion to gouge Americans at the pump. The companies' rapacity and the country's vulnerability are direct results of Bush's Big Oil energy policy" ("The Disaster President." The Nation, Sep. 26, 2005: 3-4).


"A Washington Post investigative report recently analyzed the increase in gasoline prices, which went from $1.87 a gallon last September to $3.07 this year. Who grabbed this $1.20-a-gallon increase? The report found that gasoline taxes actually fell by two cents, and our local distributors and gas stations got less than a penny from the increase. However, the crude oil producers--including Exxon, BP, Shell, et al.-- took an additional 46 cents from our pockets.

"But the big winners were the gasoline refiners--which also happen to be Exxon, BP, Shell, et al. Their increase was 70 cents--a 255% increase for them in one year!" (Jim Hightower and Phillip Frazer, eds. "The Hightower Lowdown." Nov. 2005.).


"Chavez has sold the discounted oil in two US markets, New York and Massachusetts... bought 12m gallons at a steep discount after US oil companies ignored its plea for help. Similar oil deals are in the works elsewhere.

"On the second scow day in the Bronx, it did not escape the notice of tenants that a foreign government stepped in after Congress did not...

"Last week Citgo bought full-pagge ads in the Washington Post and the New York Times, lauding Venezuela's role in heating the homes of the nation's poor" (Michelle Garcia. "Bronx warmly receives Venezuelan oil." Guardian Weekly, Dec. 16, 2005: 7).


"The Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez, said that he would resist an "imperialist attack" after Washington announced it would pursue an "inoculation strategy" against his government by creating a united front against its policies.

"The rhetoric reflected a rapid deterioration in relations between the two countries after Venezuelan spying allegations against the US and tit-for-tat expulsions of diplomats.

"The US secretary of state, Condoleezza Rice, used her harshest language to date in testimony to Congress last week in which she called Venezuela and Cuba "sidekicks" of Iran, and launched a campaign to rally international opposition to the Chavez government...

"Larry Birns, dirctor of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs, said the "inoculation strategy" was too late to stop the rise of leftwing and anti-American politics in Latin America" (Julian Borger. "Chavez pledges to resist US 'inoculation strategy.'" Guardian Weekly, Feb 24, 2006: 7).


Chavez Interview

"...in my interview with the president of Venezuela on March 28, he made Bush the following astonishing offer: Chavez would drop the price of oil to $50 a barrel, "not too high, a fair price," he said--a third less than the $75 a barrel for oil recently posted on the spot market. That would bring down the price at the pump by about a buck, from $3 to $2 a gallon.

But our President has basically told Chavez to tak his cheaper oil and stick it up his pipeline...

"But the ascendance of Venezuela within OPEC necessarily means the decline of the power of the House of Saud. And the Bush family wouldn't like that one bit. It comes down to "petro-dollars." When George W. ferried than-Crown Prince (now King) Abdullah of Saudi Arabia around the Crawford Ranch in a Gold cart it wasn't because America needs Arabian oil. The Saudis will always sell us their petroleum. What Bush needs is Saudi petro-dollars. Saudi Arabia has, over the past three decades, kindly recycled the cash sucked from the wallets of American SUV owners and sent much of the loot right back to New York to buy US Treasury bills and other US assets.

The Gulf potentates understand that in return for lending the US Treasury the cash to fund George Bush's $2 trillion rise in the nation's debt, they receive protection in return. They lend us petro-dollars, we lend them the 82nd Airborne.

"Chavez would put an end to all that. He'll sell us oil relatively cheaply--but intends to keep the petro-dollars in Latin America. Recently, Chavez withdrew $20 billion from the US Federal Reserve and, at the same time, lent or committed a like sum to Argentina, Ecuador, and other Latin American nations.

"Chavez, notes The Wall Street Journal, has become a "tropical IMF." And indeed, as the Venezuelan president told me, he wants to abolish the Washington-based International Monetary Fund, with its brutal free-market diktats, and replace it with an "International Humanitarian Fund"...

"Politically, Venezuella is torn in two. Chavez's "Blivarian Revolution," a close replica of Frankin Roosevelt's New Deal--a progressive income tax, public works, social security, cheap electricity--makes him wildly popular with the poor. And most Venezuelans are poor. His critics, a four-centuries' old white elite, unused to sharing oil wealth, portray him as a Castro-hugging anti-Christ...

Q: How do you respond to Bush's charge that you are destabilizing the region and interfering in the elections of other Latin American countries?

Chavez: "Mr. Bush is an illegitimate President. In Florida, his brother Jeb deleted many black voters from the electoral registers. So this President is the result of a fraud. Not only that, he is also currently applying a dictatorship in the US. People can be put in jail without being charged. They tap phones without court orders. They check what book people take out of public libraries. They arrested Cindy Sheehan because of a T-shirt she was wearing demanding the return of the troops from Iraq. They abuse blacks and latinos. And if we are going to talk about meddling in other countries, the the US is the champion of meddling in other people's affairs. They invaded Guatemala, they overthrew Salvador Allende, invaded Panama, and the Dominican Republic. They were involved in the coup d'etat in Argentina thirty years ago" (Greg Palast. "Hugo Chavez." Progressive, July 2006: 35-39).


"Also on the energy agenda should be laws and antitrust actions against Big Oil's economic tyranny at home. A decade of merger-mania has restructured the industry into a few giant cartels that can manipulate supply and demand (for example, by cutting domestic refining capacity to create gasoline shortages). These companies are so powerful, they dictate energy policy to their man in the White House and buy off lawmakers with lavish donations ($33 million in 2005, according to politcalmoneyline.com). We need public shaming of the oil companies before Congressional committees for their excess profits, fat CEO pay scales and bloated returns on capital. The Justice Department should launch an anti-trust inquiry into the oil giants' pricing policies" ("For a sane energy policy." The Nation, May 29, 2006: 4-5).



Abiogenic Oil Origin

Abiogenic petroleum origin Abiogenic petroleum origin is a term used to describe a number of different hypotheses which propose that petroleum and natural gas are formed by inorganic means rather than by the decomposition of organisms. The two principal abiogenic petroleum hypotheses, the deep gas hypothesis of Thomas Gold and the deep abiotic petroleum hypothesis, have been scientifically reviewed without confirmation.

Scientific opinion on the origin of oil and gas is that all natural oil and gas deposits on Earth are fossil fuels and are, therefore, biogenic. Abiogenesis of small quantities of oil and gas remains a minor area of ongoing research.

Some abiogenic hypotheses have proposed that oil and gas did not originate from fossil deposits, but have instead originated from deep carbon deposits, present since the formation of the Earth.[2] Additionally, it has been suggested that hydrocarbons may have arrived on Earth from solid bodies such as comets and asteroids from the late formation of the Solar System, carrying hydrocarbons with them.

Some abiogenic hypotheses gained limited popularity among geologists over the past several centuries. Scientists in the former Soviet Union widely held that significant petroleum deposits could be attributed to abiogenic origin, though this view fell out of favor toward the end of the 20th century because they did not make useful predictions for the discovery of oil deposits.[1] Previous to today, it was generally accepted that abiogenic formation of petroleum has insufficient scientific support and that oil and gas fuels on Earth are formed almost exclusively from organic material.

The abiogenic hypothesis regained support in 2009 when researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm reported they believed they had proven that fossils from animals and plants are not necessary for crude oil and natural gas to be generated.

Abiotic oil The abiotic oil hypothesis is an attempt to explain the source and formation of petroleum. As the name suggests, the hypothesis proposes that oil originates from non-biological origins. The hypothesis is mostly Soviet, mostly archaic, and mostly debunked. In the Anglophone world, abiotic oil proponents tend to cite the work of the late astrophysicist (read: not geologist) Thomas Gold.

The theory's adherents believe that oil originated as carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas rising through the deep layers of the Earth's crust. The really cranky types will claim that the Earth's rotation propels these substances toward the surface of the crust. If this mixture was lucky enough to find zirconium-containing minerals, it could react and produce petroleum hydrocarbons. Some of these would move close enough to the surface to be exploitable by humanity.

This idea seems plausible because:

Carbon monoxide and hydrogen result from volcanic activity.
These chemicals will react and form petroleum under the right conditions.
Modern 'coal to liquids' and synthetic motor oil are based on hydrocarbon transversion.
Methane exists on Saturn's moon, Titan.

Richard Heinberg on Abiotic Oil Richard Heinberg (born 1950) is an American journalist and educator who has written extensively on energy, economic, and ecological issues, including oil depletion. He is the author of thirteen books, and presently serves as the senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute.


Classic Theory of Oil Origiin

The debate over oil’s origin has been going on since the 19th century. From the start, there were those who contended that oil is primordial – that it dates back to Earth’s origin – or that it is made through an inorganic process, while others argued that it was produced from the decay of living organisms (primarily oceanic plankton) that proliferated millions of years ago during relatively brief periods of global warming and were buried under ocean sediment in fortuitous circumstances.

During the latter half of the 20th century, with advances in geophysics and geochemistry, the vast majority of scientists lined up on the side of the biotic theory. A small group of mostly Russian scientists – but including a tiny handful Western scientists, among them the late Cornell University physicist Thomas Gold – have held out for an abiotic (also called abiogenic or inorganic) theory.

Gold argued that hydrocarbons existed at the time of the solar system’s formation, and are known to be abundant on other planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and some of their moons) where no life is presumed to have flourished in the past.

Meanwhile, however, the oil companies have used the biotic theory as the practical basis for their successful exploration efforts over the past few decades. If there are in fact vast untapped deep pools of hydrocarbons refilling the reservoirs that oil producers drill into, it appears to make little difference to actual production, as tens of thousands of oil and gas fields around the world are observed to deplete, and refilling (which is indeed very rarely observed) is not occurring at a commercially significant scale or rate except in one minor and controversial instance

The abiotic theorists also hold that conventional drillers, constrained by an incorrect theory, ignore many sites where deep, primordial pools of oil accumulate; if only they would drill in the right places, they would discover much more oil than they are finding now. However, the tests of this claim are so far inconclusive: the best-documented “abiotic” test well was a commercial failure.

Fossils From Animals And Plants Are Not Necessary For Crude Oil And Natural Gas, Swedish Researchers Find What would happen if it were proven that "fossil fuels" weren't the result of decaying plant and animal matter, were actually created within the Earth due to simple chemistry and you could not be scared into believing that we were "running out" of oil and natural gas?

Proponents of so-called "abiotic oil" claim that the proof is found in the fact that many capped wells, which were formerly dry of oil, are found to be plentiful again after many years, They claim that the replenished oil is manufactured by natural forces in the Earth's mantle.

Reported in ScienceDaily, researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm have managed to prove that fossils from animals and plants are not necessary for crude oil and natural gas to be generated. The findings are revolutionary since this means, on the one hand, that it will be much easier to find these sources of energy and, on the other hand, that they can be found all over the globe.


The abiotic oil formation theory suggests that crude oil is the result of naturally occurring and possibly ongoing geological processes. This theory was developed in the Soviet Union during the Cold War, as the Union needed to be self sufficient in terms of producing its own energy. The science behind the theory is sound and is based on experimental evidence in both the laboratory and in the field. This theory has helped to identify and therefore develop large numbers of gas and oil deposits. Examples of such fields are the South Khylchuyu field and the controversial Sakhalin II field.

In its simplest form, the theory is that carbon present in the magma beneath the crust reacts with hydrogen to form methane as well as a raft of other mainly alkane hydrocarbons. The reactions are more complicated than this, with several intermediate stages. Particular mineral rocks such as granite and other silicon based rocks act as catalysts, which speed up the reaction without actually becoming involved or consumed in the process.


Colby Glass, MLIS